5

I am writing a simple card game (Similar to Snap). I've got it working, without problems, but I feel that there ought to be a more elegant solution. Given a set of win conditions:
Y beats R
R beats B
B beats Y
etc

I want to compare the two player's cards and assign both cards to the winner. Caveat: I'm teaching at secondary school level (no OOP) and want to be able to discuss the resulting code with students.

I've left the final condition as an elif, as I wanted to go back and add extra cards to the list of options

The if - elif chain works without problems; I was wondering if there was a more elegant solution.

    #I have code that randomly selects from a list, but this is the basic 
    #idea:
    p1=input("enter r,y or b")  
    p2=input("enter r,y or b")  

    stack1=[]  
    stack2=[]  

    if   p1=="r" and p2=="b":  
        stack1.extend([p1,p2])  
    elif p1=="y" and p2=="r":  
        stack1.extend([p1,p2])  
    elif p1 =="b" and p2 =="y":  
        stack1.extend([p1,p2])  
    elif p2 =="r" and p1 =="b":  
        stack2.extend([p1,p2])  
    elif p2 =="y" and p1 =="r":  
        stack2.extend([p1,p2])             
    elif p2 =="b" and p1 =="y":  
        stack2.extend([p1,p2])  

    print(stack1)  
    print(stack2)  

I've excerpted the code from the remainder - the cards are all randomly generated, so no user input is actually required.

4
  • 3
    The last three elifs can be shortend to else: stack2.extend(....) Jun 11, 2019 at 12:48
  • 1
    how about if p1 + p2 in {'rb', 'yr', 'by'}: stack.extend([p1, p2]) etc. ? Jun 11, 2019 at 13:12
  • Thanks everyone for all your help. I now have enough resources for a series of lessons. @OcasoProtal - I can't believe I missed that. Chris_Rands - I've used this idea for the extension task. RocketLL - that works nicely - and ties in with the rock-paper-scissors task that we did a while ago. Goyo - I agree, and with some of them I'll be talking about that. This all came about because I found a student with over 1200 lines of code because he ws comparing every card with every other card in the deck
    – MisterPhil
    Jun 14, 2019 at 13:46
  • this is the neatest version of what I came up with: stack1.extend([p1, p2]) if (p1 + p2) in ['rb', 'yr', 'by'] else stack2.extend([p1,p2])
    – MisterPhil
    Jun 14, 2019 at 14:12

5 Answers 5

5

Create a new dictionary with Y, R, B each mapping to 0, 1, 2.

win_map = {"Y": 0, "R": 1, "B": 2}

We can see a cyclic relationship here. 0 beats 1, 1 beats 2, and 2 beats 0. The first two cases are easy to determine using a simple >, but taking the third case into account needs another method. With a bit of ingenuity, we can see that we can "wrap" by adding 1 and using a modulo operation %. (0+1) % 3 == 1, (1+1) % 3 == 2, and (2+1) % 3 == 0, and these 3 cases are the only cases where a winner is determined.

if (win_map[p1] + 1) % 3 == win_map[p2]: ...  # p1 wins
else if (win_map[p2] + 1) % 3 == win_map[p1]: ... # p2 wins

I am not sure how well this will be conveyed to students though, but it is a cleaner solution.

Note: this method will not work with more cards, as the cyclic relationship will be broken.

4
  • 1
    +1 for elegance, this is definitely a big step to reduce duplication, but notice: for the "adding extra cards" requirement this will break (because every card only beats/loses to one card, so with e.g. 5 cards there will be pairs with no distinct winner)
    – Adam.Er8
    Jun 11, 2019 at 12:58
  • @Adam.Er8 True, edited with a variable for card count.
    – yklcs
    Jun 11, 2019 at 13:05
  • 1
    It's got more to it, still - every card wins/loses only to a single option (because the % gives a single number). Every possible pair should have an outcome, like in Rock-Paper-Scissors-Lizard-Spock
    – Adam.Er8
    Jun 11, 2019 at 13:08
  • 1
    @Adam.Er8 Ah, that's true. Edited.
    – yklcs
    Jun 11, 2019 at 13:14
3

So your win conditions look like a collection of (winner, loser) pairs and comparing your (p1, p2) input to them looks like the simplest thing to do.

win_conditions = {
    ('y', 'r'),
    ('r', 'b'),
    ('b', 'y')
}

p1=input("enter r,y or b")
p2=input("enter r,y or b")

stack1=[]
stack2=[]

if (p1, p2) in win_conditions:
    stack1.extend([p1,p2])
elif (p2, p1) in win_conditions:
    stack2.extend([p1,p2])
else:
    raise ValueError('{} and {} cannot beat each other.'.format(p1, p2))

Note that the code can be simplified if you assume that the win conditions are exhaustive.

I think you will do your students a favor if you show them how to improve readability by encansulating low-level operations in functions with proper names so that the intent is more obvious.

def beats(p1, p2):
    return (p1, p2) in win_conditions

if beats(p1, p2):
    stack1.extend([p1,p2])
elif beats(p2, p1):
    stack2.extend([p1,p2])
else:
    raise ValueError('"{}" and "{}" cannot beat each other.'.format(p1, p2))

Maybe you can find a better name for whatever you want to achieve by extending the list.

1

"Standard" solution for small scale problem like yours is to put all possibilities into map:

result_map = { ('r', 'b'): 1, ('b', 'y'): 1, ('y', 'r'): 1, 
('b', 'r'): 2, ('y', 'b'): 2, ('r', 'y'): 2 }
v = result_map.get((p1, p2), None)
if v == 1:
    stack1.extend([p1, p2])
elif v == 2:
    stack2.extend([p1, p2])

Why like this? Because it gives you easy way to change win / loose condition (just change a dictionary), win / loose rules can be completely arbitrary and it is easy to follow code (image you've some weird if-else condition and someone else comes looking at this code and wonders, what is going on and why).

0

You're repeating the same thing too many times, there are two extend calls that are repeated 3 times each.

You could greatly simplify your code by using the or keyword:

# extend to "stack1"
if (p1 == "r" and p2 == "b") or (p1 == "y" and p2 == "r") or (p1 == "b" and p2 == "y"):
  stack1.extend([p1, p2])

# extend to "stack2"
elif (p2 == "r" and p1 == "b") or (p2 == "y" and p1 == "r") or (p2 == "b" and p1 == "y"):
  stack2.extend([p1, p2])

Good luck.

1
  • I would argue that you are also repeating the same thing too many times: the same long chain of comparisons with only two variables swapped. Encapsulating that in a function not only improves readability and clarifies intent but also eliminates duplication and abstracts out a low level detail (how do we find out wo the winner is?) from the rest of the code. Jun 11, 2019 at 19:32
0

Just another way to compare, maybe it can be used in for loop or dict map to help refactor your code, if necessary and performance not important.

from operator import and_ 
from functools import partial

def compare(a, b, c, d):
    return and_(a == c, b == d) 

p1 = 'r'
p2 = 'b'
cmp_p1_p2 = partial(compare, p1, p2)
cmp_p2_p1 = partial(compare, p2, p1)

cmp_p1_p2('r', 'b')
# True
cmp_p2_p1('b', 'r')
# True

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