0

I have a 10-second countdown script that runs on DeltaTime.

In my Update function, I'm trying to make it print, only once, "Hello" whenever it reaches second 8.

The problem is that deltaTime is repeatedly printing "Hello" while it hangs on the 8th second, rather than only printing once, and I don't know how to stop that behavior.

I kept trying to introduce triggers in the if-block that set to 0 as soon as the block is entered but it still keeps continuously printing "Hello" so long as the timer is on second 8.

Countdown Timer

using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using UnityEngine;
using UnityEngine.UI;

public class CountdownTimer : MonoBehaviour
{
    float currentTime = 0f;
    float startingTime = 10f;
    public int n = 0;
    public int switcher = 0;


    // Start is called before the first frame update
    void Start()
    {
        currentTime = startingTime;
    }

    // Update is called once per frame
    void Update()
    {        
        currentTime -= 1 * Time.deltaTime; //does it each frame
        n = Convert.ToInt32(currentTime);
        if (n == 8)
        {
            switcher = 1;
        }
    }
}

Update Method in different class

if (CountdownTimer.switcher == 1)
{
    CountdownTimer.switcher = 0;
    print("hey");
}

Any ideas on how to make print("hey") only happen once? It's important because later I would replace the print code with an important method and I need to make sure the method happens only once.

1

The solution @Everts provides is pretty good, but as you are using unity I would recommend a couple of tweaks to play nicer with the editor. Instead of a generic event I recommend using a UnityEvent from the UnityEngine.Events namespace. I would also advise against statics due to how unity goes about serializing them across scenes. There are some weird edge cases you can get into if you aren't familiar with how unity handles their serialization. If you just need to send a message to another object in the same scene I would actually recommend a game manager. You can safely do a GameObject.Find() in onvalidate() and link your variables to avoid a performance hit at runtime doing the find. If that data needs to carry across to a different scene for this message then use a ScriptableObject instead. It would look something like below.

Put this component on the scene's "Game Manager" GameObject


    public class CountingPassthrough : MonoBehaviour
    {
        public CountdownTimer countdownTimer;
    }

put this component on the scene's "Timer" GameObject

    public class CountdownTimer : MonoBehaviour
    {
        public float startingTime = 10f;
        public UnityEvent timedOut = new UnityEvent();

        private void OnValidate()
        {
            if(FindObjectOfType<CountingPassthrough>().gameObject.scene == gameObject.scene && FindObjectOfType<CountingPassthrough>() != new UnityEngine.SceneManagement.Scene())
                FindObjectOfType<CountingPassthrough>().countdownTimer = this;
        }

        private void Start()
        {
            StartCoroutine(TimerCoroutine());
        }

        // Coroutine is called once per frame
        private IEnumerator TimerCoroutine()
        {
            float currentTime = 0f;
            while (currentTime != 0)
            {
                currentTime = Mathf.Max(0, currentTime - Time.deltaTime);
                yield return null;//wait for next frame
            }
            timedOut.Invoke();
        }
    }

Put this component on the GameObject you want to use the timer

    public class user : MonoBehaviour
    {
        [SerializeField, HideInInspector]
        private CountingPassthrough timerObject;

        private void OnValidate()
        {
            if(FindObjectOfType<CountingPassthrough>().gameObject.scene == gameObject.scene && FindObjectOfType<CountingPassthrough>() != new UnityEngine.SceneManagement.Scene())
                timerObject = FindObjectOfType<CountingPassthrough>();
        }

        private void OnEnable()
        {
            timerObject.countdownTimer.timedOut.AddListener(DoSomething);
        }

        private void OnDisable()
        {
            timerObject.countdownTimer.timedOut.RemoveListener(DoSomething);
        }

        private void DoSomething()
        {
            //do stuff here...
        }
    }

This workflow is friendly to prefabs too, because you can wrap the find() in onvalidate() with if(FindObjectOfType<CountingPassthrough>().gameObject.scene == gameObject.scene) to prevent grabbing the wrong asset from other loaded scenes. And again, if you need this to carry data across scenes then have CountingPassthrough inherit from ScriptableObject instead of MonoBehaviour, create the new ScriptableObject to your project folder somewhere, and ignore that extra if check to constrain scene matching. Then just make sure you use a function to find it that includes assets if you use the cross-scene ScriptableObject approach.

EDIT:Forgot nested prefabs edgecase in unity 2018+ versions. You need to add this to account for it: && FindObjectOfType<CountingPassthrough>() != new UnityEngine.SceneManagement.Scene() I've updated the code snippet above. Sorry about that.

2

This is where you want to implement a system of subscriber with event/listener.

Add an event to the countdown, if countdown is meant to be unique, you can even make it static. Also, if the update is no longer needed after the setting of switcher to 1 then you can convert that to coroutine

public class CountdownTimer : MonoBehaviour
{
    float currentTime = 0f;
    float startingTime = 10f;
    public static event Action RaiseReady;

    // Start is called before the first frame update
    void Start()
    {
        currentTime = startingTime;
        StartCoroutine(UpdateCoroutine());
    }

    // Update is called once per frame
    IEnumerator UpdateCoroutine()
    { 
        while(true)
        {       
            currentTime -= 1 * Time.deltaTime; //does it each frame
            int n = Convert.ToInt32(currentTime);
            if (n == 8)
            {
                RaiseReady?.Invoke();
                RaiseReady = null; // clean the event
                yield break; // Kills the coroutine
            }
            yield return null;
        }
    }
}

Any component that needs to know:

public class MyClass : MonoBehaviour
{
     void Start()
     {
         CountdownTimer.RaiseReady += CountdownTimer_RaiseReady;
     }
     private void CountdownTimer_RaiseReady()
     {
          Debug.Log("Done");
          // Remove listener though the other class is already clearing it
          CountdownTimer.RaiseReady -= CountdownTimer_RaiseReady;
     }
}
  • Thanks, that's very good info to have! – matthew Jun 12 at 8:41
  • I was testing out this solution, and I'm having some problems. It seems that the currentTime variable in UpdateCoroutine doesn't actually count down, like it would if it were inside an Update method. For instance, if I add the test code print("in"); inside the if(n==8) branch, it never prints it to Console. If I force it to hit the branch by saying n=8 it prints "in", but still, Debug.Log("Done") never prints to Console. Any ideas...? Am having issues implementing the other solution for similar reasons. – matthew Jun 13 at 0:21
  • 1
    Yes, I missed the while loop, my bad – Everts Jun 13 at 10:14
1

Since Updtade() is called once per frame, then switcher is set to 1 once per frame during the 8th second (and there is a lot of frames in 1 sec).

An answer could be something like this to prevent it from printing again :

if (CountdownTimer.switcher == 1)
{
    if (!AlreadyDisplayed)
    {
        print("hey");
        AlreadyDisplayed = true;
    }
}

Where AlreadyDisplayed is a Boolean set to false when declared.
This should do what you want to achieve. :)

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