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I used git init --bare to create a bare repository on linux, but I want to set its source directory location at the same time, so that although the bare repository only saves git commit records, I can do it directly on linux. Find the source code.

  • When you write "its source directory", are you refering to the working tree? (If so, there is no working tree in a bare repository, that's the point of --bare.) – RomainValeri Jun 12 at 8:32
  • Yes. But I want to set up the source directory in the bare repository. I also looked at a lot of information and didn't find anything about setting up the source directory in the bare repository. But I think there should be this need, so that I can see the bare warehouse on Linux, or directly see the source directory. – 拉丁小毛 Jun 12 at 8:36
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A bare repo does not have the default worktree, but you can add one or as many as you want to.

If you create a bare repo from scratch, it does not have any commit yet. You need to either push commits from another repository or create at least one in the bare repo.

# 1. push from another repository "bar"
cd /path/to/bar
git push /path/to/foo master

# add a worktree for "master"
cd /path/to/foo
git worktree add /path/to/worktree master

# ------------------------------------------------

# 2. create commit from the bare repository "foo"
cd /path/to/foo

# create the empty tree
tree=$(git hash-object -w -t tree --stdin < /dev/null)

# create a commit from the tree
commit=$(git commit-tree -m "initial commit" $tree)

# create "master" from the commit
git update-ref refs/heads/master $commit

# add a worktree for "master"
git worktree add /path/to/worktree master

But now if you clone /path/to/foo and make commits and then push master back to /path/to/foo, the status in the worktree /path/to/worktree will be a bit odd. You need to run git reset --hard in /path/to/worktree to update its status and code.

Besides a worktree, you can also make a clone from /path/to/foo.

git clone /path/to/foo worktree
cd worktree
# checkout branch "master", which should be already checked out by default
git checkout master
# update "master"
git pull origin master
# update other branches
git fetch
# checkout a new branch "dev" which has been pushed to /path/to/foo
git checkout dev

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