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What is the correct code syntax (Set the StringBuilder instance to Nothing at the end the function) when use stringbuilder in a function that return a string? Usually i try to use the statement 'using', but StringBuilder don't implement iDisposable.

To be more precise: i want to release the memory occupied from the StringBuilder instance when GC will run, so i'd like to set the StringBuilder instance to Nothing at the end of the Function.

Please do someone know 'where' should i set the StringBuilder instance to Nothing?

Here's the code.

Function GetString() As String
    Try()
        Dim sb As New StringBuilder
        sb.AppendLine("my first line")
        Return sb.ToString()
        'Should i put here 'sb = Nothing' ?
    Catch()
        Return Nothing
    End Try()
End Function

Or it's better this solution?

Function GetString() As String
    Dim sb As New StringBuilder
    Try()
        sb.AppendLine("my first line")
        Return sb.ToString()
    Catch()
        Return Nothing
    End Try()
    'Or should i put here 'sb = Nothing' ?
End Function
  • You don't need to set the StringBuilder to nothing, .net garbage collector will handle all that is necessary. Why do you think you need to do that? As you seem to already know, when a class is implementing IDisposable, you need to worry about this and use the using-block. – Esko Jun 12 at 8:55
  • @Esko But StringBuilder doesn't implement idisposable. so i can't write 'Using sb as new StringBuilder'. And why you say i don't need to set the StringBuilder To Nothing? Shouldn't be a good practice destroy all variables not more used, without waiting the GC? – Marcello Jun 12 at 9:09
  • 1
    There's no such thing as "destroying a variable". If a type implements the IDisposable interface then you should dispose objects of that type when you are done with them. If you only use them in a defined scope, a Using block is the best way to do that. If a type doesn't implement IDisposable then there's nothing to "destroy". You can set a variable to Nothing to make the object it referred to available for garbage collection sooner but, if the variable falls out of scope immediately anyway, that would be pointless. Only clear a variable that will be in scope for some time after. – jmcilhinney Jun 12 at 9:12
  • @jmcilhinney sorry, with destroying i was meaning set it to Nothing. So in the example, where would you set the StringBuilder to Nothing? and why? – Marcello Jun 12 at 9:23
  • 1
    Like I stated before, it's a matter of scoping. Once a variable falls out of scope (Return is called), it’s popped off the stack and the reference is removed. If you can’t wait for the scope to exit, you likely need to refactor your code. The example you gave is relatively simple, but if by chance the method was longer and did a lot more things, you could simply break those into smaller methods, thereby managing the scopes of the variables declared. Further to that, there is no way to set the variable to Nothing after you've already called Return. And clearly, you can't set it before. – Anu6is Jun 12 at 10:10
0

I wrote the same function in c#, in your case is not necessary to clean the "stringbuilder" variable but, to make certain clean after the return statement you can use a try… finally block.

static string GetString()
{
     StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
     try
     {
          sb.AppendLine("myfirstline");
          return sb.ToString();
     }
     finally
     {
          sb = null;
     }
}
  • Thank you very much for yuor help, bdn02. I think that because i declared the StringBuilder instance 'outside' the Try-Catch block, i could set it to Nothing also Outside the Try-Block Catch. I think a best practice would set it to Nothing as i wrote in my second example (outside of Try-Catch). – Marcello Jun 12 at 10:46
  • 1
    No, best practice would not be to set it to Nothing. As you have been told over and over, there is no point setting that variable to Nothing because the variable itself ceases to exist immediately after. The only reason to set a variable to Nothing is if the variable itself will remain in scope for a long time, thus preventing the garbage collector finalizing the object it refers to. If the variable goes out of scope then the that reference to the object no longer exists so the effect is the same. Setting the variable to Nothing is pointless. Doing pointless things is bad practice. – jmcilhinney Jun 12 at 13:29
  • @jmcilhinney thanks, you're right, now i understand. GC process unused methods asap, so memory occupied from local variables are quickly released. Thank you for your precious help. – Marcello Jun 13 at 19:47
0

Ok, thanks to some users (@jmcilhinney, @Anu6is) who spent lot of time helping me to learn, i post my answer.

The correct syntax to release local resources in a method is this:

Function GetString() As String
    Try()
        Dim sb As New StringBuilder
        sb.AppendLine("my first line")
        Return sb.ToString()
    Catch()
        Return Nothing
    Finally()
        'N.B. Good practice don't write
        'sb = Nothing
    End Try()
End Function

Please, note that in the Finally statement i wrote 'Good Practice' to don't write

sb = Nothing

Why? Because every Local variable inside of a method, when the execution of the code exit the method, are automatically 'cleaned' by the Garbage Collector (the GC release the memory previously occupied by the local variables, but if the execution of the code will use again the method before the garbage collector runs, the memory area previously occupied will be riallocated by the pointer of the new instances of the local variables).

Different approach is when a method uses a non-local variable:

Class MyClass
    Dim sb As New StringBuilder

    Friend Function GetString(ByVal text as String()) As String
        Try()
            For Each Txt As String In text
                sb.AppendLine(Txt)
            Next Txt
            Return sb.ToString
        Catch()
            Return Nothing
        Finally()
            'Here i can write:
            'sb.Clear
            'or
            'sb = Nothing 
        End Try()
     End Function
 End Class

Why in this case could be a good practice to set the variable to Nothing or (in this case) release the memory occupied by the StringBuilder Value?

Could be, if in example, i use the method in the beginning of the program, and not more.

Or if the StringBuilder 'store' an huge amount of data, for lot of time.

In this case, we 'choose' to set the StringBuilder to Nothing, to release occupied memory, that will not be used by the program.

This article, explain well the cases when, it's good practice to set a variable to Nothing, inside of a method.

https://blog.stephencleary.com/2010/02/q-should-i-set-variables-to-null-to.html

After this, a question could come in mind:

'But if i wait that the Garbage Collector will 'release' memory, for how long i have to wait? ...Ticks ...Milliseconds, ...Seconds, ...Minutes...?

Here a link that can help:

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/standard/garbage-collection/fundamentals

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