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I have created a DbContext, similar to the one below

public class ProductsDB : DbContext
{
    public virtual DbSet<Product> Products { get; set; } 
    //..other stuff..
}

Here's Product;

[Table("product")]
public class Product
{
    [Column("Product_ID")]
    public int ID { get; set; }
    //other fields...
}

This all works fine until I create a class that inherits from "Product";

[Table("CentralProducts")]
public class CentralProduct : Product
{
    //fields...
}

When I run integration tests I get an error that states that dbo.CentralProducts doesn't exist. It doesn't, and for the database that ProductsDB is connecting to I don't want it to.

I have tried the various inheritance options but they either require the addition of a table to my database, or the addition of a discriminator column to the Product table.

I had hoped that since my context doesn't consume CentralProducts it would not require it to exist. I was using table-per-type inheritance so there shouldn't be any need for something consuming dbo.Product to be able to access dbo.CentralProduct. Is there a way to configure EF6 to allow for this?

The reason I am trying to do this is that I have two databases, each with a common set of tables. I would like to create two DbContexts, one for each database, each containing the core entities but also including a few differences. In this particular case, the second DbContext has a Product table that includes an additional field, hence my attempt at inheritance to solve the problem.

  • You may be better off just keeping them separate. While inheritance may seem a neat solution now, you might be introducing unnecessary complexity that is hard to manage later. – ste-fu Jun 12 at 9:54
  • @ste-fu Thanks, that is my current approach. I'm just duplicating the whole Product class and renaming it "CentralProducts" (and adding the additional fields). Its just a shame because any field added to Product will now also have to be added to CentralProduct. It's not the end of the world. – mark_h Jun 12 at 10:02
  • You might be able to get away with using a BaseProduct class, which is the base class for the Product and CentralProduct classes in different contexts. But it feels a little dirty to me. – Bradley Uffner Jun 12 at 10:31
  • 1
    Looks like you're looking for complex type. – Gert Arnold Jun 13 at 19:44
1

Have you tried to inherit the class without using the TableAttribute?

Instead of typing

[Table("CentralProducts")]
public class CentralProduct : Product
{
    //fields...
}

Try using:

public class CentralProduct : Product
{
    //fields...
}

According to MSDN the attribute should only be used when associating a class with an entity class. And if I'm not interpreting your question wrong, that's not what you want to do.

Use this attribute to designate a class as an entity class that is associated with a database table or view. LINQ to SQL treats classes that have the TableAttribute attribute as persistent classes.

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  • thanks, but the additional fields in CentralProduct would need to have their values persisted to the database. Without the Table attribute I don't think EF would know how to map the values I set for those fields to a column in database. – mark_h Jun 12 at 10:47
  • Ah, I understand, sorry for the missinterpretation. – frittzinator Jun 12 at 10:55
  • 1
    If an answer is off the mark please remove it. – Gert Arnold Jun 13 at 19:41

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