2

I try to start some action in background, I am not interested in its result, but in case of an error I'd like to log it, and - of course - prevent the application (here: a Windows service) from crashing.

    public static void CreateAndStartTaskWithErrorLogging(Action _action, string _componentName, string _originalStacktrace = null)
    {
        DateTime started = HighPrecisionClock.Now;
        Task task = new Task(_action);
        task.ContinueWith(_continuation => _continuation.LogExceptions(_componentName, started, _originalStacktrace));
        task.ConfigureAwait(false);
        task.Start();
    }
    internal static void LogExceptions(this Task _t, string _componentName, DateTime _started, string _originalStacktrace = null)
    {
        try
        {
            _t.Wait(1000);
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            Logger.LogError(_componentName, $"An exception occurred in a fire-and-forget task which was started at {_started}.\r\n" +
                                            $"The original stack trace is:\r\n{_originalStacktrace}");
            Logger.LogException(_componentName, ex);
        }
        try
        {
            _t.Dispose();
        }
        catch (Exception dex)
        {
            Logger.LogException(_componentName, dex);
        }
    }

Without ConfigureAwait(false) and without _t.Dispose(), the catch works and logs the exception. But the application crashes several seconds later (i.e. on the Finalizer thread?). The entry in the Microsoft Event Viewer shows that exception.

With ConfigureAwait and _t.Dispose(), I do not see the exception in the logs, the application just crashes.

What's wrong with the idea shown above?

Edit:

Meanwhile I tested without ConfigureAwait but with _t.Dispose. I could catch about 10 such exceptions, and none made the application crash. That seems to solve the issue, but I do not understand the reason for that, so the situation is still bad.

What does ConfigureAwait(false) do to Exceptions in the task (or in tasks started within that task, e.g. by a Parallel.ForEach further down)?

Why does the Dispose - which is called on the continuation, not the task proper according to a comment - prevent the crash (the Finalizer does not call Dispose, but Dispose may set some flags influencing its behavior)?

Edit 2:

Also that does not work all the time, only most of the time. Suggested solution 1 below also fails sometimes.

In the crashing context, the function is called with Utilities.TaskExtensions.CreateAndStartTaskWithErrorLogging(() => DataStore.StoreSyncedData(data), Name);, where DataStore is set to a composite which in turn calls Parallel.ForEach(m_InnerDataStores, _store => { _store.StoreSyncedData(_syncedData); }); on its members. One of them writes a video with the Accord library, which sometimes causes an AccessViolation at <Module>.avcodec_encode_video2(libffmpeg.AVCodecContext*, libffmpeg.AVPacket*, libffmpeg.AVFrame*, Int32*), i.e. the exception may come from non-managed code.

Of course, I could try to catch it somewhere down there - but that's not the objective of this method. I expect it to be able to safely run any code in the background without crashing the application.

  • 1
    Don't guess where the error is, post the full stack trace. – SO used to be good Jun 12 at 10:44
  • In your case _t is not task rather the task of the continuation itself, so that task disposes itself. – muaz Jun 12 at 11:18
1

This is my suggestion for logging errors:

public static void OnExceptionLogError(this Task task, string message)
{
    task.ContinueWith(t =>
    {
        // Log t.Exception
    }, TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnFaulted | TaskContinuationOptions.ExecuteSynchronously);
}

Usage example:

var task = Task.Run(action);
task.OnExceptionLogError("Oops!");
try
{
    await task;
}
catch
{
    // No need to log exception here
}
  • Thanks for your suggestion. Of the last 6 errors, it could catch 5 of them. With one error, it did not even log the error, but the application crashed. – Bernhard Hiller Jun 14 at 8:13

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.