1

Having two files a.py and b.py with the following content works as expected:

# a.py

import b

def a_logger(msg):
    print("a logger:", msg)

b.run()

b.set_logger(a_logger)
b.run()
# b.py

def b_logger(msg):
    print("b logger:", msg)

def set_logger(logf):
    global b_logger
    b_logger = logf

def run():
    b_logger('hello world!')

Prints

b logger: hello world!
a logger: hello world!

Moving b.py into a module works as well. However, when organized as a package as follows it breaks:

# aa.py
import bb

def a_logger(msg):
    print("a logger:", msg)

bb.run()

bb.set_logger(a_logger)
bb.run()
# __init__.py

from .bb import set_logger
from .cc import run
# bb.py

def _bb_logger(msg):
    print("b logger:", msg)

def set_logger(logf):
    global _bb_logger
    _bb_logger = logf
# cc.py

from .bb import _bb_logger

def run():
    _bb_logger('hello world!')

Prints

b logger: hello world!
b logger: hello world!

Apparently, cc.py keeps its own copy of _bb_logger. Why, and how can I get the intended behaviour?


Some observations:

  • using a class or a list to enclose the function works, so the problem seems to be the reassignment
  • moving the from .bb import _bb_logger statement into the run function works as well
  • 1
    Put the variable in the modules namespace, no global and you are allowed to change it but not reassign it. If you need reassignment, it's better to use a class and a class attribute. – Klaus D. Jun 12 at 11:27
  • @KlausD. I verified that reassignment works with a class. Do you have insight into what causes this behaviour? – mrupp Jun 12 at 11:38
  • @mrupp: cc imports a value, not a variable, despite storing it in a variable of the same name as that in bb. If you want bb’s variable, say so: bb._bb_logger. – Davis Herring Jun 12 at 13:59
  • @DavisHerring. Thanks, that likely explains it. Accessing bb._bb_logger could be cumbersome notation-wise, and does not work for me ('module bb has no attribute _bb_logger'). I currently work around the problem by using a class and @staticmethods. – mrupp Jun 13 at 14:51
  • @mrupp: Whether it’s cumbersome or not, Python simply doesn’t have shared, unqualified variables. And I can’t reproduce your error with that approach. – Davis Herring Jun 13 at 23:28

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