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I need to create random data in Haskell. I want my code to be: a) reproducible from a seed b) the threading of generators to be implicit

I understand Monads generally and the way that Random Generators work. My approach is to thread the generator through the code so I can reproduce the random numbers but want to hide the threading of the generators in a Monad. I'm thinking that the State Monad is a good approach.

Here's some simple code:

type Gen a = State StdGen a

roll :: Gen Int
roll = state $ randomR (1, 6)

roll2 :: Gen Int
roll2 = (+) <$> roll <*> roll

test :: Int -> IO ()
test seed = do
  let gen = mkStdGen seed
  print (evalState roll gen)
  print (evalState roll gen)
  print (evalState roll2 gen)
  print (evalState roll2 gen)

I'm trying to use State so that I can push the threading of the generator into the State Monad but the results of roll are the same and results of roll2 are the same. I can see that this is because I'm passing gen into the functions multiple times so of course it would produce the same output. So that makes me think I need to get a new generator from each function. But then I'm back to having to thread the generator through the code which is what I'm trying to avoid by using State. I feel like I'm missing a trick!

I explored MonadRandom too and that did push the threading away from my code but I couldn't see how to make that approach be reproducible.

I've hunted a lot and tried many things but seem to always either be able to hide the generators OR make the code reproducible but not both.

I'm keen to use a Monad more specific than IO.

I'm also going to build a series of more complex functions which will generate random lists of numbers so I need to have a simple way to make these random functions rely on each other. I managed that with MonadRandom but again I couldn't see how that could be reproducible.

Any help appreciated.

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If you needn't interleave IO with randomness, as here, then the answer is just to lump your State actions together into one with the Monad operations (they're the thing passing the state around for you!).

test :: Int -> IO ()
test seed = do
  print a
  print b
  print c
  print d
  where
  (a,b,c,d) = flip evalState (mkStdGen seed) $ do
    a <- roll
    b <- roll
    c <- roll2
    d <- roll2
    return (a,b,c,d)

If you will need to interleave IO and randomness, then you will want to look into StateT StdGen IO as your monad instead of using State StdGen and IO separately. That might look like this, say:

roll :: MonadState StdGen m => m Int
roll = state (randomR (1,6))

roll2 :: MonadState StdGen m => m Int
roll2 = (+) <$> roll <*> roll

test :: (MonadState StdGen m, MonadIO m) => m ()
test = do
  roll >>= liftIO . print
  roll >>= liftIO . print
  roll2 >>= liftIO . print
  roll2 >>= liftIO . print

(You could then use e.g. evalStateT test (mkStdGen seed) to turn this back into an IO () action, or embed it into a larger computation if there were further random things you needed to generate and do IO about.)

MonadRandom does little more than package up StateT StdGen in a way that lets you still use non-seed state, so I encourage you to reconsider using it. evalRand and evalRandT from Control.Monad.Random.Lazy (or .Strict) shouldy give you the repeatability you need; if they don't, you should open a fresh question with the full details of what you tried and how it went wrong.

  • Thanks @Daniel Wagner - this really clarifies things for me - I don't need to interleave so the first approach should be fine. I will have another look at MonadRandom when I have time. – Adahus Jun 12 at 19:05
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Normally, it's pretty much the whole point of a random generator that you don't always get the same result. And that's the reason why you use a state monad: to pass on the updated generator, so that the next random event will actually be different.

If you want always the same value, then there's not really any reason to use special random tooling at all – just generate one value once (or two values), then pass it on whereever needed, like you would pass on another variable.

test :: IO ()
test = do
   [dice0, dice1] <- replicateM 2 $ randomRIO (1,6)
   print dice0
   print dice0
   print $ dice0+dice1
   print $ dice0+dice1
  • 2
    The point is reproducibility. Pseudo-randomness is required for effects such as backoff, dithering, standard noise functions and so on. Being able to test a dithering algorithm by repeatedly using the same RNG (in quotes) sequence is very useful. – Bob Dalgleish Jun 12 at 17:54
  • @BobDalgleish sure, but a dithering algorithm that uses the same brightness tweak for every pixel wouldn't accomplish anything. The trick is to seed it always with the same constant at the beginning of the program, but then propagate/update the generator throughout, so that values within the program run vary. (Whether you want corresponding values in different program runs to be the same depends on the application.) – leftaroundabout Jun 12 at 18:43
  • For my application I wanted to choose a seed at the start and then for exactly the same sequence of random numbers to be produced - that's what I was meaning by repeatability. The point is that I want the roll function to produce a random number each time so it might or might not be the same as previously. @Bob Dalgleish, "Reproducibility" is I think a better word to describe what I need. My primary reason for this is that I want to create random data but if I discover a bug or problem with my software I want to be able to reproduce the exact same random sequence so I can debug the issue. – Adahus Jun 12 at 19:04
  • @Adahus ok, that makes much more sense. Unfortunately your question was phrased rather ambiguously. And I couldn't see you meaning that, because it's just what the random/state monad does. – leftaroundabout Jun 12 at 19:06
  • @leftroundabout - I'll edit the question to make this clearer. Thanks – Adahus Jun 12 at 19:07

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