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I'm trying to use pysftp with an external Linux server, but when I try to concatentate path and file names using os.path.join() or pathlib.Path() they understandably default to the local (Windows) path separator \\. '/'.join() does the trick, but doesn't feel like the right answer, but might be the best solution.

import os
from pathlib import Path, PosixPath

os.path.join('path', 'to', 'file.txt')
# path\to\file.txt -- Windows

Path('path') / 'to' / 'file.txt'
# path\to\file.txt -- Windows

'/'.join(('path', 'to', 'file.txt'))
# path/to/file.txt -- Posix

Often enough, I'm getting the path/to from the current working directory of pysftp so feeding that in rather than building the entire path string manually, the '/'.join() method is still the only one that works.

os.path.join('path/to', 'file.txt')
# path/to\file.txt -- Mixed

Path('path/to') / 'file.txt'
# path\to\file.txt -- Windows

'/'.join(('path/to', 'file.txt'))
# path/to/file.txt -- Posix

Is there a way to force os.path.join() or pathlib.Path to use the Posix separator while I'm running on Windows? I tried setting the sep attribute of Path, but it seems like that would have to be done for each Path individually even if it didn't raise the AttributeError and it doesn't seem to want to let me instantiate the PosixPath class directly.

p = Path('path/to')
p.sep = '/'
# AttributeError: 'WindowsPath' object has no attribute 'sep'

PosixPath('path') / 'to' / 'file.txt'
# NotImplementedError: cannot instantiate 'PosixPath' on your system

Trying to "trick" the os module with os.name = 'posix' or os.sep = '/' doesn't work either

print(os.name)
# nt
print(os.path.join("path", "to", "file.txt"))
# path\to\file.txt -- Windows as expected
os.sep = '/'
print(os.path.join("path", "to", "file.txt"))
# path\to\file.txt -- Windows as expected

os.name = 'posix'
print(os.name)
# posix
print(os.path.join("path", "to", "file.txt"))
# path\to\file.txt -- still Windows.
os.sep = '/'
print(os.path.join("path", "to", "file.txt"))
# path\to\file.txt -- still Windows.

Should it matter, I'm running python 3.7.0

Python 3.7.0 (v3.7.0:1bf9cc5093, Jun 27 2018, 04:59:51) [MSC v.1914 64 bit (AMD64)] on win32

1 Answer 1

5

Looks like os imports either ntpath or posixpath depending on what it determines your operating system to be from os.name. Unfortunately we know renaming os.name or os.sep doesn't work without a module reload, but you can get away with importing the two path modules directly:

>>> import posixpath
>>> import ntpath
>>> ntpath.join('asds','asdf', 'adf.txt')
'asds\\asdf\\adf.txt'
>>> posixpath.join('asdfa','asdf','asdf.txt')
'asdfa/asdf/asdf.txt'

or setting os.path if you want to use os

>>> import os
>>> os.path
<module 'posixpath' from '/home/usr/anaconda3/lib/python3.7/posixpath.py'>
>>> os.path = ntpath
>>> os.path
<module 'ntpath' from '/home/usr/anaconda3/lib/python3.7/ntpath.py'>
>>> os.path.join('asdfa','asd', 'asdf.txt')
'asdfa\\asd\\asdf.txt'
>>> os.path = posixpath
>>> os.path.join('asdfa','asd', 'asdf.txt')
'asdfa/asd/asdf.txt'

An alternative to using os would be to use the forward slash / as your path separator in your code. This is cross-platform.

'path/to/somefile.txt'

7
  • if I was hard coding locations, then sure, but it's not very flexible. And since I'm using pysftp to find the files in the first place, I can't exactly hard code it anyway. As indicated in my answer '/'.join() works, but I'm wondering if there's a way to make os or pathlib use a format other than the local system.
    – Cohan
    Commented Jun 12, 2019 at 16:24
  • updated answer. I wasn't able to test it across both OS but this code runs in Ubuntu. Commented Jun 12, 2019 at 16:34
  • see here for more: github.com/python/cpython/blob/master/Lib/os.py Commented Jun 12, 2019 at 16:39
  • 1
    I also found this: effbot.org/librarybook/ntpath.htm looks like you can import posixpath and import ntpath separately. Commented Jun 12, 2019 at 16:53
  • 1
    I've updated the question with the results i got from your suggestions. I will also note that i logged into an ubuntu server running python 3.5.2 and my results do not match what you show.
    – Cohan
    Commented Jun 12, 2019 at 17:05

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