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I'm trying to pass child data to parent on an onClick event that happens in a parent button.

I have a basic mock defined below to explain what I'm trying to achieve.

const Parent = () => {

    const childData = (data) => {
        console.log(data);
    }

    const receiveData = () => {
        childData();
    }

    return (
        <>
            <button onClick={receiveData}>Receive Child Data</button>
            <Child onParentClick={childData} />
        </>
    )
}

const Child = ({onParentClick}) => {
    // Trigger onParentClick here to pass some data to parent
    return (
        // something
    )
}

How can I achieve this?

0
class Parent extends Component {
  passDataToParent = data => {
    console.log(data);
  }
  render() {
    return (
      <Child passDataToParent={this.passDataToParent} />
    );
  }
}

const Child = props => {
  buttonClick = () => {
    const data = {
      a: 1
    };
    props.passDataToParent(data);
  };
  return (
    <Button onClick={buttonClick} />
  )
}
  • See that's the thing I don't want to have a button in child. – ZeroDarkThirty Jun 13 at 3:26
  • Somehow you need to have an event trigger/listener in the child component to send its data to its parent component. – Ken Ryan Labso Jun 13 at 3:29
  • 1
    Can we know why you don't want to put your button in your child? Cause that's your only way to pass those data to the parent. – JkAlombro Jun 13 at 3:44
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You can do something like this with callbacks (this example is using hooks)..

Edit: this does feel like an 'anti-pattern' to me though... It has been my understanding that React is meant for one way data flow from the top down.. (eg. why this is so tricky to accomplish, use of 'higher order components', etc..).. Furthermore, this doesn't necessarily "pass" data up to the parent.. it would be more appropriate to say 'a reference to a child function is being passed to the parent'.. the parent just calls the child function. Meaning "data" is not passed, rather the function itself.. Please correct me if I am wrong... I am fairly new to React. Finally, I do not understand the use case for something like this -- in which scenario does one need to use this "paradigm"?

[CodePen Mirror]

// Parent
const Parent = () => {
  let child;
  
  function getChildData(callbacks){
    child = callbacks;
  }

    return (
      <div>
        <button onClick={() => child.getData()}>Retreive Child Data</button>
        <Child onRetreiveChildData={callbacks => getChildData(callbacks)} />
      </div>
    );
}

// Child
const Child = ({ onRetreiveChildData }) => {
  const [state, setState] = React.useState({
    data: "Default Child Data"
  });

  if (onRetreiveChildData) {
    onRetreiveChildData({
      getData: () => getData("Data from Child: " + Math.random())
    });
  }
  
  function getData(data){
    setState({ data: data });
  };

  return (
    <pre>{state.data}</pre>
  )
};


ReactDOM.render(<Parent />, document.getElementById("root"));
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/16.8.3/umd/react.production.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react-dom/16.8.3/umd/react-dom.production.min.js"></script>

<div id='root' style='width: 100%; height: 100%'>
</div>

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