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Find a simple grammar for the following language, assuming Σ={a,b,c} L={anbn+2cm : n≥0, m≥1}

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My strategy here is going to be to look for the parts of the strings to see how they're related. I see three main parts of this string:

  1. the string of a: maybe none, but any number
  2. the string of b: the same as the number of a, plus two
  3. the string of c: any number but at least one

We see that the numbers of a and b are related, but the number of c is totally unrelated. If we can get a grammar for just the first two parts, we can concatenate a symbol which is the start symbol of a grammar for the other part, and get a grammar for all three parts. In symbols:

S   -> S' S''
S'  -> (first two parts)
S'' -> (third part)

Let's do the grammar for the third part, the one with c, first. The shortest string that belongs to that part is the string c of length one; so, we can add a production like S'' -> c. To get a longer string given one that's already a valid third part, we can add another c; this suggests the production S'' -> S'' c. In fact, we can confirm that these two productions let us generate all valid third parts. Our grammar looks like this:

S   -> S' S''
S'  -> (first two parts)
S'' -> S'' c | c

Now let's try the first two parts. We can actually break this into two parts as well: the part that has matched a and b, and the part that is the extra +2 instances of b. Our grammar looks like this now:

    S -> S' S''
   S' -> S''' S''''
  S'' -> S'' c | c 
 S''' -> (matched a and b)
S'''' -> bb

To get the grammar for matched a and b, the only part remaining, we can use the same procedure we used for the third part. The shortest string of matched a and b is the empty string (here, we don't require the number to be strictly positive); this implies S''' -> e. Given a valid string of matched a and b, you can get the next one by adding an a to the front and a b to the back: S''' -> a S''' b. Our completed grammar looks like this:

    S -> S' S''
   S' -> S''' S''''
  S'' -> S'' c | c 
 S''' -> a S''' b | e
S'''' -> bb

Now, to simplify this grammar, we can eliminate empty productions and we can eliminate nonterminal symbols like S'''' that just stand in for a string of terminals. To eliminate the empty production, we need to add an extra production with S''' removed wherever there is an existing production with S''' in it. There are two such productions, so we will add two productions and remove the empty one:

    S -> S' S''
   S' -> S''' S'''' | S''''
  S'' -> S'' c | c 
 S''' -> a S''' b | ab
S'''' -> bb

Getting rid of S'''' is easy, just replace any instance of it with bb:

    S -> S' S''
   S' -> S''' bb | bb
  S'' -> S'' c | c 
 S''' -> a S''' b | ab

That should more or less do it. Proof is left as an exercise.

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