0

If I have a Kotlin sequence, every invocation of take(n) restarts the sequence.

val items = generateSequence(0) {
    if (it > 9) null else it + 1
}

@Test fun `take doesn't remember position`() {
    assertEquals(listOf(0, 1), items.take(2).toList())
    assertEquals(listOf(0, 1, 2), items.take(3).toList())
}

Is there an easy way of write say, another(n) such that

@Test fun `another does remember position`() {
    assertEquals(listOf(0, 1), items.another(2).toList())
    assertEquals(listOf(2, 3, 4), items.another(3).toList())
}

I suppose that I have to have something that isn't the Sequence to keep the state, so maybe what I'm actually asking for is a nice definition of fun Iterator<T>.another(count: Int): List<T>

2

Sequence does not remember its position, but its iterator does remember:

val iterator : Iterator<Int> = items.iterator()

Now all you need is something like take(n) but for Iterator<T>:

public fun <T> Iterator<T>.another(n: Int): List<T> {
    require(n >= 0) { "Requested element count $n is less than zero." }
    if (n == 0) return emptyList()
    var count = 0
    val list = ArrayList<T>(n)
    for (item in this) {
        list.add(item)
        if (++count == n)
            break
    }
    return list
}
  • 2 cracks at it eh? Which do you think is better? – Duncan McGregor Jun 14 at 13:04
  • This one answers the initial question, the other one is for people who will fix it in stdlib – voddan Jun 15 at 16:52
1

What about this:

    @Test
    fun `another does remember position`() {
        val items: Sequence<Int> = generateSequence(0) {
            if (it > 9) null else it + 1
        }

        val (first, rest) = items.another(2)
        assertEquals(listOf(0, 1), first.toList())
        assertEquals(listOf(2, 3, 4), rest.another(3).first.toList())
    }

    fun <T> Sequence<T>.another(n: Int): Pair<Sequence<T>, Sequence<T>> {
        return this.take(n) to this.drop(n)
    }
  • I like that this is referentially transparent – Duncan McGregor Jun 14 at 13:06
1

To answer the last part of your question:

I suppose that I have to have something that isn't the Sequence to keep the state, so maybe what I'm actually asking for is a nice definition of fun Iterator.another(count: Int): List

One such implementation would be:

fun <T> Iterator<T>.another(count: Int): List<T> {
    val collectingList = mutableListOf<T>()
    while (hasNext() && collectingList.size < count) {
        collectingList.add(next())
    }
    return collectingList.toList()
}

This passes your test if you use the iterator produced by the sequence:

@Test
fun `another does remember position`() {
    val items = generateSequence(0) {
        if (it > 9) null else it + 1
    }.iterator() //Use the iterator of this sequence.
    assertEquals(listOf(0, 1), items.another(2))
    assertEquals(listOf(2, 3, 4), items.another(3))
}

To me what you've described is an iterator, since it's something that allows you to go over a collection or sequence etc. but also remember its last position.

NB the implementation above wasn't written to take into consideration what should happen for non-positive counts passed in, and if the count is larger than what's left to iterate over you'll be returned a list which has smaller size than n. I suppose you could consider this an exercise for yourself :-)

  • I've accepted @voddan's answer as his code was a little more efficient, but this is a fine answer – Duncan McGregor Jun 15 at 22:16
0

Sequence does not remember its position, but its iterator does remember:

val iterator : Iterator<Int> = items.iterator()

Unfortunately there is no take(n) for an iterator, so to use the one from stdlib you need to wrap iter into an Iterable:

val iterable : Iterable<Int> = items.iterator().asIterable()

fun <T> Iterator<T>.asIterable() : Iterable<T> = object : Iterable<T> {
    private val iter = this@asIterable
    override fun iterator() = iter
}

That makes itareble.take(n) remember its position, but unfortunately there is a of-by-one error because the standard .take(n) asks for one element too many:

public fun <T> Iterable<T>.take(n: Int): List<T> {
    require(n >= 0) { "Requested element count $n is less than zero." }
    if (n == 0) return emptyList()
    if (this is Collection<T>) {
        if (n >= size) return toList()
        if (n == 1) return listOf(first())
    }
    var count = 0
    val list = ArrayList<T>(n)
    for (item in this) {
        if (count++ == n)
            break
        list.add(item)
    }
    return list.optimizeReadOnlyList()
}

That can be fixed with a little tweak:

public fun <T> Iterable<T>.take2(n: Int): List<T> {
    require(n >= 0) { "Requested element count $n is less than zero." }
    if (n == 0) return emptyList()
    if (this is Collection<T>) {
        if (n >= size) return toList()
        if (n == 1) return listOf(first())
    }
    var count = 0
    val list = ArrayList<T>(n)
    for (item in this) {


        list.add(item)
        //count++
        if (++count == n)
            break
    }
    return list
}

Now both of you tests pass:

@Test fun `take does not remember position`() {
    assertEquals(listOf(0, 1), items.take2(2).toList())
    assertEquals(listOf(0, 1, 2), items.take2(3).toList())
}

@Test fun `another does remember position`() {
    assertEquals(listOf(0, 1), iter.take2(2).toList())
    assertEquals(listOf(2, 3, 4), iter.take2(3).toList())
}
  • 2 cracks at it eh? Which do you think is better? – Duncan McGregor Jun 14 at 13:04

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