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Lets say I have html page, when ever user clicks on the page an event should occur on the press of a user click it should save all attributes behind that elements.

<head>
<script>
document.addEventListener('click', function(e) {
    e = e || window.event;
    var target = e.target || e.srcElement,
        text = target.textContent || target.innerText;   
}, false);
</script>
</head>
<body>
<p style="color: green">
The content above was created with JavaScript.<br>
This content is created with <b>HTML</b>.<br>
You can edit JavaScript and HTML in the left part of the page
and click "<b>Run code</b>" to view results in the right part of the page.
</p>
<div id="dev1">
<p style="color: green">
The content above was created with JavaScript.<br>
Username : <input type="text" name="txtusername" id="username" > <br><br>
Password : <input type="Password" name="password" id="passname" >
</p>
</div>
<b>LESSON 4: CALL A JAVASCRIPT FUNCTION:</b>
</body>
</html>```
  • 1
    What's your problem - your var target should contain everything you need. – Mike Brockington Jun 13 at 10:41
  • e = e || window.event; Wow...blast from the past. :-D – T.J. Crowder Jun 13 at 10:42
  • @T.J. IE is not dead, it's still haunting all over the world. – Teemu Jun 13 at 10:43
  • @Teemu - IE < 11 is dead. IE11 passes the event object to the handler. The code in the question would fail on any version of IE that didn't, as it uses addEventListener, not attachEvent. – T.J. Crowder Jun 13 at 10:44
  • I'm afraid it's not clear what you're asking here. As Mike said above, your target variable should refer to the clicked element. Your code currently accesses the text content of the clicked element, if it has any. (The input elements don't, they have values.) If you need to get attributes from them, you'd either use the reflected property for the attribute (if it has one, like href or src) or getAttribute("attr-name-here"). Is that what you're asking? – T.J. Crowder Jun 13 at 10:45
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Here is the code to do so:

  document.onclick = function(event) {
    elem = event.target.attributes;
    console.log(event.target.attributes);
    attributes = Object.getOwnPropertyNames(elem);
    console.log(attributes)
  }

It will log the attributes of very element you click on the console, along with their values.

You need to access their keys.

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