29

I have a method that has to remove any element listed in a (small) Set<K> keysToRemove from some (potentially large) Map<K,V> from. But removeAll() doesn't do, as I need to return all keys that were actually removed, since the map might or might not contain keys that require removal.

Old-school code is straight forward:

public Set<K> removeEntries(Map<K, V> from) {
    Set<K> fromKeys = from.keySet();
    Set<K> removedKeys = new HashSet<>();
    for (K keyToRemove : keysToRemove) {
        if (fromKeys.contains(keyToRemove)) {
            fromKeys.remove(keyToRemove);
            removedKeys.add(keyToRemove);
        }
    }
    return removedKeys;
}

The same, written using streams:

Set<K> fromKeys = from.keySet();
return keysToRemove.stream()
        .filter(fromKeys::contains)
        .map(k -> {
            fromKeys.remove(k);
            return k;
        })
        .collect(Collectors.toSet());

I find that a bit more concise, but I also find that lambda too clunky.

Any suggestions how to achieve the same result in less clumsy ways?

  • 2
    How about just collecting all keys that can be removed and then call removeAll() on that filtered set? Or how about "filtering" on fromKeys::remove? – Thomas Jun 13 at 14:28
  • 1
    I believe and inferring from the answers here, the improvement that comes mostly out of any change is by using if (fromKeys.remove(keyToRemove)) { removedKeys.add(keyToRemove); } instead of using both contains and remove in if (fromKeys.contains(keyToRemove)) { fromKeys.remove(keyToRemove); removedKeys.add(keyToRemove); } – Naman Jun 13 at 16:51
23

The “old-school code” should rather be

public Set<K> removeEntries(Map<K, ?> from) {
    Set<K> fromKeys = from.keySet(), removedKeys = new HashSet<>(keysToRemove);
    removedKeys.retainAll(fromKeys);
    fromKeys.removeAll(removedKeys);
    return removedKeys;
}

Since you said that keysToRemove is rather small, the copying overhead likely doesn’t matter. Otherwise, use the loop, but don’t do the hash lookup twice:

public Set<K> removeEntries(Map<K, ?> from) {
    Set<K> fromKeys = from.keySet();
    Set<K> removedKeys = new HashSet<>();
    for(K keyToRemove : keysToRemove)
        if(fromKeys.remove(keyToRemove)) removedKeys.add(keyToRemove);
    return removedKeys;
}

You can express the same logic as a stream as

public Set<K> removeEntries(Map<K, ?> from) {
    return keysToRemove.stream()
        .filter(from.keySet()::remove)
        .collect(Collectors.toSet());
}

but since this is a stateful filter, it is highly discouraged. A cleaner variant would be

public Set<K> removeEntries(Map<K, ?> from) {
    Set<K> result = keysToRemove.stream()
        .filter(from.keySet()::contains)
        .collect(Collectors.toSet());
    from.keySet().removeAll(result);
    return result;
}

and if you want to maximize the “streamy” usage, you can replace from.keySet().removeAll(result); with from.keySet().removeIf(result::contains), which is quiet expensive, as it is iterating over the larger map, or with result.forEach(from.keySet()::remove), which doesn’t have that disadvantage, but still, isn’t more readable than removeAll.

All in all, the “old-school code” is much better than that.

  • 1
    @Naman that’s what I posted as second variant, right for the case that the iteration matters. However, the retainAll/removeAll combo will iterate over the set that has been specified by the OP as being rather small. – Holger Jun 13 at 17:38
  • 2
    @Naman that’s hitting implementation details, but I assume that it works like AbstractSet.removeAll(…), if not even inheriting right that method: “This implementation determines which is the smaller of this set and the specified collection, by invoking the size method on each. …[etc]”. Using a stateful predicate for partitioningBy is as discouraged as for filter, but with the latter, you’re collection another set of actually unwanted elements… – Holger Jun 13 at 17:50
  • 3
    @cs95 well yes, for most SO answers, I write some test code, either from scratch or using the question’s code as starting point, if any. Depending on the context, it might be in Netbeans, Eclipse or command line. When it comes to compiler-dependent behavior, I also have batch files to compile&run the same source code with different JDKs. – Holger Jun 14 at 7:08
  • 1
    @Naman my last sentence was written in a hurry. I wanted to say, that partitioningBy does more work when necessary, when only one of the two sets is needed. Besides that, it’s like the filter approach. – Holger Jun 14 at 7:17
  • 2
    @Marco13 I often do this, especially for questions containing an example, but not every answer would benefit from examples. Further, not all of my test code is a minimal example. And sometimes, it gets edited for other tests, without having all test in the code at a time, so it would require significant cleanup before getting published. – Holger Jun 14 at 13:44
13

More concise solution, but still with unwanted side effect in the filter call:

Set<K> removedKeys =
    keysToRemove.stream()
                .filter(fromKeys::remove)
                .collect(Collectors.toSet());

Set.remove already returns true if the set contained the specified element.

 P.S. In the end, I would probably stick with the "old-school code".

  • 4
    Exactly my thought ;) - It just feels a little hacky because we're "filtering" on a method that actually represents a side effect. – Thomas Jun 13 at 14:32
5

I wouldn’t use Streams for this. I would take advantage of retainAll:

public Set<K> removeEntries(Map<K, V> from) {
    Set<K> matchingKeys = new HashSet<>(from.keySet());
    matchingKeys.retainAll(keysToRemove);

    from.keySet().removeAll(matchingKeys);

    return matchingKeys;
}
  • 3
    That’s pointing into the right direction, but you are copying the “potentially large” from map’s keyset whereas you can copy the “small” keysToRemove instead, as the intersection of a and b is the same as of b and a. Further, matchingKeys is potentially smaller than keysToRemove, so removeAll(matchingKeys) is preferable. – Holger Jun 13 at 15:43
  • @Holger I see your point, but the Set is merely copying references, which seems benign to me, unless the Map’s size is truly huge. You’re right about removeAll(matchingKeys) though. Updated. – VGR Jun 13 at 15:49
  • 3
    It’s not just copying references, but hashing. And since the OP stated the expected sizes and swapping the two is trivial, I’d do this. In fact, I did. – Holger Jun 13 at 15:52
4

You can use the stream and the removeAll

Set<K> fromKeys = from.keySet();
Set<K> removedKeys = keysToRemove.stream()
    .filter(fromKeys::contains)
    .collect(Collectors.toSet());
fromKeys.removeAll(removedKeys);
return removedKeys;
4

You can use this:

Set<K> removedKeys = keysToRemove.stream()
        .filter(from::containsKey)
        .collect(Collectors.toSet());
removedKeys.forEach(from::remove);

It's similar to Oleksandr's answer, but avoiding the side effect. But I would stick with that answer, if you are looking for performance.

Alternatively you could use Stream.peek() for the remove, but be careful with other side effects (see the comments). So I would not recommend that.

Set<K> removedKeys = keysToRemove.stream()
        .filter(from::containsKey)
        .peek(from::remove)
        .collect(Collectors.toSet());
3

To add another variant to the approaches, one could also partition the keys and return the required Set as:

public Set<K> removeEntries(Map<K, ?> from) {
    Map<Boolean, Set<K>> partitioned = keysToRemove.stream()
            .collect(Collectors.partitioningBy(k -> from.keySet().remove(k),
                    Collectors.toSet()));
    return partitioned.get(Boolean.TRUE);
}
  • Also leaves a choice of using the keys that were not a part of the keySet of the map. (just in case) – Naman Jun 13 at 17:04

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.