22

Below is a snippet from my Jenkins file -

stage('Configure replication agents') {
            environment {
                AUTHOR_NAME="XX.XX.XX.XX" 
                PUBLISHER_NAME="XX.XX.XX.XX"
                REPL_USER="USER"
                REPL_PASSWORD="PASSWORD"
                AUTHOR_PORT="4502"
                PUBLISHER_PORT="4503"
                AUTHOR="http://${AUTHOR_NAME}:${AUTHOR_PORT}"
                PUBLISHER="http://${PUBLISHER_NAME}:${PUBLISHER_PORT}"
                S_URI= "${PUBLISHER}/bin/receive?sling:authRequestLogin=1"
            }
            steps {
                sh 'curl -u XX:XX --data "status=browser&cmd=createPage&label=${PUBLISHER_NAME}&title=${PUBLISHER_NAME}&parentPath =/etc/replication/agents.author&template=/libs/cq/replication/templates/agent" ${AUTHOR}/bin/wcmcommand'
            }

The above command, in Jenkins console, is printed as

curl -u XX:XX --data status=browser&cmd=createPage&label=XXXX&title=XXX&parentPath =/etc/replication/agents.author&template=/libs/cq/replication/templates/agent http://5XXXX:4502/bin/wcmcommand

Note how the double quotes "" are missing.

I need to preserve the double quotes after --data in this command. How do I do it? I tried using forward slashes but that didnt work.

Cheers

1
  • 1
    You want the data to contain the " right? so you want to escape the " with a single slash on the shell, that means you need to escape that slash with another slash in groovy. Im just not sure if thats needed in the single quote, but wirth a try to use double slashes i.e. \\"[...]\\". Commented Jun 14, 2019 at 10:12

6 Answers 6

47

To expand on my comment, a quick test revealed its the case.

You need to escape twice, once the quote for the shell with a slash, and once that slash with a slash for groovy itself.

node() {
    sh 'echo "asdf"'
    sh 'echo \"asdf\"'
    sh 'echo \\"asdf\\"'
}

Result

[Pipeline] {
[Pipeline] sh
+ echo asdf
asdf
[Pipeline] sh
+ echo asdf
asdf
[Pipeline] sh
+ echo "asdf"
"asdf"
[Pipeline] }
[Pipeline] // node
[Pipeline] End of Pipeline
3
  • 2
    sh 'echo \\"asdf\\"' was the solution for me, since I could not use single quotes to wrap \\"asdf\\"
    – Iorek
    Commented Feb 11, 2020 at 21:16
  • Thanks for providing this -- was banging my head against the wall trying to figure out who was eating my double quotes. Commented Nov 29, 2022 at 21:55
  • This works indeed, but may not be required if you just need the double quotes as part of the executed command. The problem is that the double quotes on the Jenkins Console are misleading.
    – Bruno
    Commented Mar 14, 2023 at 16:45
10

After long time of struggling and googling, this is what has worked for me on similar use case:

sh("ssh [email protected] \"su user -c \\\"mkdir ${newDirName}\\\"\"")

Update: How I think it gets interpreted

1] sh extension strips first escaping (\" becomes " and \\ becomes \, first and last " are not part of input)

ssh [email protected] "su user -c \"mkdir ${newDirName}\""

2] ssh command strips second level of escaping (\" becomes ", while outer " also not part of input)

su user -c "mkdir ${newDirName}"
4
  • why do we need here 3 backslashes? can you explain please? I am a bit confused by this. Thanks!
    – mihior
    Commented Aug 14, 2022 at 7:53
  • 1
    I've updated the answer, let me know if it helps.. at least a bit :-)
    – teejay
    Commented Aug 26, 2022 at 13:31
  • oh, I see, definitely helps, thanks a lot!
    – mihior
    Commented Aug 27, 2022 at 7:10
  • 1
    In the general case, this is insecure (the OP's way was actually safer): jenkins.io/doc/book/pipeline/jenkinsfile/…
    – Bruno
    Commented Mar 14, 2023 at 16:36
3

I had double quotes inside the variable, so escaped single quotes worked for me:

sh "git commit -m \'${ThatMayContainDoubleQuotes}\'"
1
0

I needed the output to be with trailing \\ so I had to do something like this

echo 'key1 = \\\\"__value1__\\\\"' > auto.file
File looks like
cat auto.file
key1 = \\"__value1__\\"
Dependent Script
            export value1="some-value"
            var=${value1}

            # Read in template one line at the time, and replace variables
            tmpfile=$(mktemp)
            sed -E 's/__(([^_]|_[^_])*)__/${\\1}/g' auto.file > ${tmpfile}

            while read auto
            do
              eval echo "$auto"
            done < "${tmpfile}" > autoRendered.file

            rm -f ${tmpfile}
Rendered File looks like
cat autoRendered.file
key1 = "some-value"
0

For anyone who comes looking for a fix to a similar issue with quoting numbers during helm install/upgrade, you can use --set-string instead of --set

Ref: https://helm.sh/docs/chart_best_practices/values/#consider-how-users-will-use-your-values

0

Please note that some of the other answers that suggest using a script string in double quotes could potentially be vulnerable to Injection via Interpolation.

What you had in the question was actually already the recommended way to pass variables to a list more securely to a shell step.


What you're seeing is just an issue with the Jenkins Console, not with the script you're running. According to the CloudBees knowledgebase:

No action is required.

The "weird" escaping is just for the build console output of the command that was run, which escapes things one more level than what was actually received (to prevent things like ANSI escape codes from applying to that output).

If the double quotes had not actually been part of the running script, this would have resulted in multiple commands run in the background (separated with &). This would have executed these (not necessarily in order):

  • curl -u XX:XX --data status=browser
  • cmd=createPage
  • label=${PUBLISHER_NAME}
  • title=${PUBLISHER_NAME}
  • ...

As an example, if you run this:

pipeline {
    agent any

    stages {
        stage('Test') {
            steps {
                sh '''
                echo "1&echo&echo"
                
                echo 1&echo&echo
                '''
            }
        }
    }
}

You get this on the Jenkins console:

[Pipeline] {
[Pipeline] stage
[Pipeline] { (Test)
[Pipeline] sh
+ echo 1&echo&echo
1&echo&echo
+ echo

+ echo 1
1
+ echo

[Pipeline] }
[Pipeline] // stage
[Pipeline] }
[Pipeline] // node
[Pipeline] End of Pipeline
  • The first line with double quotes (echo "1&echo&echo") is displayed on the console without the quotes (+ echo 1&echo&echo), but is quite clearly executed with the double quotes (the output is 1&echo&echo). It's just a Jenkins console display issue.

  • The second line without double quotes (echo 1&echo&echo) shows what happens when the double quotes are actually missing in the script execution (and you get 3 commands on the Jenkins console):

+ echo

+ echo 1
1
+ echo

In this example, I'm using valid commands after the &, but in general you'll get some non-sense, which at best will not execute anything and at worst execute something you didn't want.


Another illustration:

pipeline {
   agent any

    stages {
        stage('Test') {
            steps {
                sh '''
                echo "asdf"
                echo \"asdf\"
                echo \\"asdf\\"
                
                # We display the script itself onto the console
                cat "$0"
                
                # We also save the test sript into a temporary file to check its content
                cat "$0" > /tmp/test.txt
                '''
            }
        }
    }
}

This will show this on the Jenkins Console:

+ echo asdf
asdf
+ echo asdf
asdf
+ echo "asdf"
"asdf"
+ cat /var/lib/jenkins/workspace/test-project@tmp/durable-f0e4a021/script.sh

                echo "asdf"
                echo "asdf"
                echo \"asdf\"
                
                # We display the script itself onto the console
                cat "$0"
                
                # We dump the script itself to check its content later
                cat "$0" > /tmp/test.txt
                + cat /var/lib/jenkins/workspace/test-project@tmp/durable-f0e4a021/script.sh

The executed script itself (dumped into test.txt) will be as follows (this is what's actually executed):

                echo "asdf"
                echo "asdf"
                echo \"asdf\"

                # We display the script itself onto the console
                cat "$0"

                # We dump the script itself to check its content later
                cat "$0" > /tmp/test.txt

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