4

I'm new to pandas and have a very basic question, please!

On Python v3.6 through spyder:

x= pd.DataFrame(columns = ['1','2'])
print(x)
x['1'] = '25'
print(x)

From the print statements, the dataframe x does not appear to change. My question: What does x['1'] = '25' do, if anything?

  • It does nothing, because the DataFrame is empty. There is no space it can assign to, so nothing happens. – cs95 Jun 14 at 17:23
7

There is actually a difference between the semantics of assigning scalars and iterables (think containers such as lists as list-like objects).

Consider,

df = pd.DataFrame(columns=['1', '2'])                                                                                             
df                                                                                                                                  

Empty DataFrame
Columns: [1, 2]
Index: []

You've defined an empty dataframe without any index (no rows), but only a schema for the columns.

When you assign a scalar to a column, the assignment is broadcast across all rows. In this case, since there are none, nothing happens:

df['1'] = 123
df

Empty DataFrame
Columns: [1, 2]
Index: []

However, assigning a list-like iterable is a different story, as pandas will create new rows for it:

df['1'] = [123]
df

     1    2
0  123  NaN

Now, to understand how scalar assignment works, consider a similar empty DataFrame, but with a defined index:

df = pd.DataFrame(columns=['1', '2'], index=[0, 1])
df                                                                                                                                  

     1    2
0  NaN  NaN
1  NaN  NaN

it is still "empty" (not really), but now we can assign scalars and the assignment is broadcast,

df['1'] = 123
df                                                                                                                                  

     1    2
0  123  NaN
1  123  NaN

Contrast this behaviour with that previously shown.

  • 2
    Pandas must do some type checking on assigning an iterable, because iterables like strings do not follow the same behavior that a list/array do (I'm defining iterable using isistance(x, collections.Iterable) – user3483203 Jun 14 at 17:48
  • 2
    @user3483203 Thanks for mentioning that, I've edited to make it clear I'm talking about list-like iterables :) – cs95 Jun 14 at 17:50
  • Okay, thanks,this makes the idea of scalars vs. list-like iterables a lot clearer in my head! – DBless Jun 17 at 15:57

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.