2

I want to implement a function that outputs the respective strings as an array from an input string like "str1|str2@str3":

function myFunc(string) { ... }

For the input string, however, it is only necessary that str1 is present. str2 and str3 (with their delimiters) are both optional. For that I have already written a regular expression that performs a kind of split. I can not do a (normal) split because the delimiters are different characters and also the order of str1, str2, and str3 is important. This works kinda with my regex pattern. Now, I'm struggling how to extend this pattern so that you can escape the two delimiters by using \| or \@.

How exactly can I solve this best?

var strings = [
  'meaning',
  'meaning|description',
  'meaning@id',
  'meaning|description@id',
  '|description',
  '|description@id',
  '@id',
  'meaning@id|description',
  'sub1\\|sub2',
  'mea\\|ning|descri\\@ption',
  'mea\\@ning@id',
  'meaning|description@identific\\|\\@ation'
];

var pattern = /^(\w+)(?:\|(\w*))?(?:\@(\w*))?$/ // works without escaping
console.log(pattern.exec(strings[3]));

Accordingly to the problem definition, strings 0-3 and 8-11 should be valid and the rest not. myFunc(strings[3]) and should return ['meaning','description','id'] and myFunc(strings[8]) should return [sub1\|sub2,null,null]

  • 1
    Do you realize your strings have no \s? You need to double \ in a string literal to input a single backslash. – Wiktor Stribiżew Jun 14 at 18:27
  • No. I already tried to extend my pattern with negative lookbehinds. But I could not get it to work. – Miguel Franken Jun 14 at 18:32
  • See my answer below. – Wiktor Stribiżew Jun 14 at 18:32
0

You need to allow \\[|@] alognside the \w in the pattern replacing your \w with (?:\\[@|]|\w) pattern:

var strings = [
  'meaning',
  'meaning|description',
  'meaning@id',
  'meaning|description@id',
  '|description',
  '|description@id',
  '@id',
  'meaning@id|description',
  'sub1\\|sub2',
  'mea\\|ning|descri\\@ption',
  'mea\\@ning@id',
  'meaning|description@identific\\|\\@ation'
];

var pattern = /^((?:\\[@|]|\w)+)(?:\|((?:\\[@|]|\w)*))?(?:@((?:\\[@|]|\w)*))?$/;
for (var s of strings) {
   if (pattern.test(s)) {
     console.log(s, "=> MATCHES");
   } else {
     console.log(s, "=> FAIL");
   }
}

Pattern details

  • ^ - string start
  • ((?:\\[@|]|\w)+) - Group 1: 1 or more repetitions of \ followed with @ or | or a word char
  • (?:\|((?:\\[@|]|\w)*))? - an optional group matching 1 or 0 occurrences of
    • \| - a | char
    • ((?:\\[@|]|\w)*) - Group 2: 0 or more repetitions of \ followed with @ or | or a word char
  • (?:@((?:\\[@|]|\w)*))? - an optional group matching 1 or 0 occurrences of
    • @ - a @ char
    • ((?:\\[@|]|\w)*) Group 3: 0 or more repetitions of \ followed with @ or | or a word char
  • $ - end of string.
0

My guess is that you wish to split all your strings, for which we'd be adding those delimiters in a char class maybe, similar to:

([|@\\]+)?([\w]+)

If we don't, we might want to do so for validations, otherwise our validation would become very complicated as the combinations would increase.

const regex = /([|@\\]+)?([\w]+)/gm;
const str = `meaning
meaning|description
meaning@id
meaning|description@id
|description
|description@id
@id
meaning@id|description
sub1\\|sub2
mea\\|ning|descri\\@ption
mea\\@ning@id
meaning|description@identific\\|\\@ation`;
let m;

while ((m = regex.exec(str)) !== null) {
    // This is necessary to avoid infinite loops with zero-width matches
    if (m.index === regex.lastIndex) {
        regex.lastIndex++;
    }
    
    // The result can be accessed through the `m`-variable.
    m.forEach((match, groupIndex) => {
        console.log(`Found match, group ${groupIndex}: ${match}`);
    });
}

Demo

0

Seems like what you're looking for may be this?

((?:\\@|\\\||[^\|@])*)*

Explanation: Matches all sets that include "\@", "\|", or any character except "@" and "|".

https://regexr.com/4fr68

  • OP mentioned the order is important so, no, it is not what is expected. – Wiktor Stribiżew Jun 14 at 18:42

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