0

I'm using CMake 3.13, with inherent support for CUDA as a language, to build a project. This project requires the nVIDIA Toolkit Extensions library. On a previous system, I had it under /usr/local/cuda/lib64. I used a find_library() command which I thought should be sufficient, and all was well. But - it isn't, and it wasn't: On a system in which CUDA is installed using OS distribution packages, under /usr directly, my command doesn't work.

To be more specific, I'm using:

find_library(CUDA_NVTX_LIBRARY
  NAMES nvToolsExt nvTools nvtoolsext nvtools nvtx NVTX
  PATHS ${CUDA_TOOLKIT_ROOT_DIR} ENV LD_LIBRARY_PATH
  PATH_SUFFIXES "lib64" "common/lib64" "common/lib" "lib"
  DOC "Location of the CUDA Toolkit Extension (NVTX) library"
  NO_DEFAULT_PATH
)

and this is missing /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libnvToolsExt.so.

Questions:

  • How should I alter my find_library command not to miss such target-platform-specific folders?
  • Am I looking for the NVTX library the wrong way? Can I somehow rely on what CMake finds internally instead?

Notes:

  • I have basically the same issue with libOpenCL.so, nVIDIA's OpenCL layer.

2 Answers 2

2

(This answer regards CMake versions earlier than 3.17; you should really switch to a newer version of CMake, which makes your life much easier.)

CMake does figure out the paths of a lot of other CUDA-related libraries, e.g.:

CUDA_CUDART_LIBRARY:FILEPATH=/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libcudart.so
CUDA_CUDA_LIBRARY:FILEPATH=/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libcuda.so
CUDA_cublas_LIBRARY:FILEPATH=/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libcublas.so
CUDA_cudadevrt_LIBRARY:FILEPATH=/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libcudadevrt.a
CUDA_cudart_static_LIBRARY:FILEPATH=/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libcudart_static.a
CUDA_cufft_LIBRARY:FILEPATH=/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libcufft.so
CUDA_cupti_LIBRARY:FILEPATH=/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libcupti.so
CUDA_curand_LIBRARY:FILEPATH=/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libcurand.so
CUDA_cusolver_LIBRARY:FILEPATH=/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libcusolver.so
CUDA_cusparse_LIBRARY:FILEPATH=/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libcusparse.so
CUDA_nppc_LIBRARY:FILEPATH=/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libnppc.so
CUDA_nppial_LIBRARY:FILEPATH=/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libnppial.so
CUDA_nppicc_LIBRARY:FILEPATH=/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libnppicc.so
CUDA_nppicom_LIBRARY:FILEPATH=/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libnppicom.so
CUDA_nppidei_LIBRARY:FILEPATH=/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libnppidei.so
CUDA_nppif_LIBRARY:FILEPATH=/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libnppif.so
CUDA_nppig_LIBRARY:FILEPATH=/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libnppig.so
CUDA_nppim_LIBRARY:FILEPATH=/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libnppim.so
CUDA_nppist_LIBRARY:FILEPATH=/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libnppist.so
CUDA_nppisu_LIBRARY:FILEPATH=/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libnppisu.so
CUDA_nppitc_LIBRARY:FILEPATH=/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libnppitc.so
CUDA_npps_LIBRARY:FILEPATH=/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libnpps.so
CUDA_rt_LIBRARY:FILEPATH=/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/librt.so

I think it's actually a bug that it doesn't do so for the NVTX and OpenCL libraries. Still, we can take the paths it finds for other libraries - perhaps the main one, CUDA_CUDART_LIBRARY, and use it as a search hint.

The result is even uglier than what I had before, but it does seems to work:

get_filename_component(CUDA_CUDART_LIBRARY_DIR "${CUDA_CUDART_LIBRARY}" PATH CACHE)

find_library(CUDA_OPENCL_LIBRARY
  NAMES OpenCL opencl
  PATHS "${CUDA_CUDART_LIBRARY_DIR}" "${CUDA_TOOLKIT_ROOT_DIR}" ENV LD_LIBRARY_PATH
  PATH_SUFFIXES "lib64" "lib"
  DOC "Location of the CUDA OpenCL support library"
  NO_DEFAULT_PATH
)

find_library(CUDA_NVTX_LIBRARY
  NAMES nvToolsExt nvTools nvtoolsext nvtools nvtx NVTX
  PATHS "${CUDA_CUDART_LIBRARY_DIR}" "${CUDA_TOOLKIT_ROOT_DIR}" ENV LD_LIBRARY_PATH
  PATH_SUFFIXES "lib64" "common/lib64" "common/lib" "lib"
  DOC "Location of the CUDA Toolkit Extension (NVTX) library"
  NO_DEFAULT_PATH
)


0

You may try CMAKE_CUDA_IMPLICIT_LINK_DIRECTORIES (suggested here), which worked for me:

project(theproject LANGUAGES CUDA)
find_library(LIBNVTOOLSEXT nvToolsExt PATHS ${CMAKE_CUDA_IMPLICIT_LINK_DIRECTORIES})
0

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.