1

I've found the following code on the internet.

 class A {
        public void perform_work() {
            System.out.println("A");
        }
    }
class B extends A {
    public void perform_work() {
        System.out.println("B");
    }
}

class C extends B {
    public void perform_work() {
        ((A) this).perform_work(); // Line 163
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        C c = new C();
        c.perform_work();
    }
}

This code compiles cleanly, but It gives me an error when running it:

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.StackOverflowError
    at com.hamzablm.C.perform_work(Main.java:163)
    at com.hamzablm.C.perform_work(Main.java:163)
    at com.hamzablm.C.perform_work(Main.java:163)
    at com.hamzablm.C.perform_work(Main.java:163)
    at com.hamzablm.C.perform_work(Main.java:163)
    at com.hamzablm.C.perform_work(Main.java:163)
    at com.hamzablm.C.perform_work(Main.java:163)
    at com.hamzablm.C.perform_work(Main.java:163)
    at com.hamzablm.C.perform_work(Main.java:163)
    at com.hamzablm.C.perform_work(Main.java:163)
    at com.hamzablm.C.perform_work(Main.java:163)

........................................... more error like that

I was expecting that line 163 (specified in the above code) would call perfom_work() defined in class A. Why this error was generated? And how to solve it?

  • 2
    Unrelated: for your own code, adhere to Java naming conventions. Method names go camelCase in Java, always. – GhostCat Jun 15 at 20:46
  • This isn't my code. Just a copy paste from the web. – hamza belmellouki Jun 15 at 21:04
8

If you want perfom_work in C to execute perfom_work in A you need to change it to:

public void perform_work() {
    super.perform_work();
}

And do the same change in B

As it is currently written it is calling itself recursively, so it never stops.

  • 1
    Oh, I see it's recursive because this is pointing to a class instance of C. – hamza belmellouki Jun 15 at 20:28
  • @hamzabelmellouki, that's correct. With super you're basically saying: "hey, call the perform_work method defined in my ancestor". – lealceldeiro Jun 15 at 20:30
1

In C in perform_work this is typecast from C to A so perform_work in A is called instead but this method is overridden in C so it goes back there where once again a typecast is done and it all happens again until you get a StackOverflowError

As mentioned in the other answer you need to use super to resolve this.

1

The code you have written in method perform_work() in class C is essentially equivalent to this:

public void perform_work() {
    A someA = this;
    someA.perform_work();
}

which as you will probably know does not change the type of the object referenced by the variable someA. It is still an object of type C and calling the perform_work() method on a reference to it will call the implementation from class C.

Just imagine the following scenario:

public static void perform_more_work(A someA) {
    someA.perform_work();
}

public void perform_work() {
    perform_more_work(this);
}

It should be obvious which method will be called by the above code.

  • Sure, I understood. This is all done by polymorphism and the actual object the reference variable is pointing to.🙂 – hamza belmellouki Jun 15 at 20:37

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