0

The problem is to get the list of first element of each tuple in a list. Erlang is giving me a hard time. How do I add elements dynamically in a list in erlang?

I tried to read the list of tuples and store it into another list to get the first element of each tuple in the list.

  getBankList([BankData|T]) ->
    {BankName, Resource}=T,
    createList(BankName),
    getBankList(T).

createList(Name)->
  List = [],
 List2 = [Name|list1].

[{jill,450},
{joe,157},
{bob,100},
{sue,125},
{pat,344}].

These are the of tuples, I need the list as: [jill,joe,bob,sue,pat]

2

If you have

List = [{jill,450}, {joe,157}, {bob,100}, {sue,125}, {pat,344}]

then

[Name || {Name, _} <- List]

will get [jill, joe, bob, sue, pat]. This is list comprehension, read more about it here.

2

You can use the lists:unzip/1 function to split a list of pair tuples into a tuple of two lists, one for the first elements and one for the second elements:

{Names, _Amounts} = lists:unzip([{jill,450}, {joe,157}, {bob,100}, {sue,125}, {pat,344}]).

The resulting Names variable is bound to [jill,joe,bob,sue,pat].

0

If you haven't covered list comprehensions yet, here is how to solve your problem with simple recursion:

-module(my).
-compile([export_all]).

firsts([]) -> [];
firsts([Tuple|Tuples]) ->
    {Name, _Amount} = Tuple,
    [Name | firsts(Tuples)].

Instead of your createList() function (and by the way, the convention is to name that function create_list()), you use a list literal in your code to create the list:

[Name | firsts(Tuples)]

In the shell:

~/erlang_programs$ erl
Erlang/OTP 20 [erts-9.3] [source] [64-bit] [smp:4:4] [ds:4:4:10] [async-threads:10] [hipe] [kernel-poll:false]
Eshell V9.3  (abort with ^G)

1> c(my).
my.erl:2: Warning: export_all flag enabled - all functions will be exported
{ok,my}

2> Data = List = [{jill,450}, {joe,157}, {bob,100}, {sue,125}, {pat,344}].
[{jill,450},{joe,157},{bob,100},{sue,125},{pat,344}]

3> my:firsts(Data).
[jill,joe,bob,sue,pat]

4>

That solution takes advantage of the fact that a list can be defined like this:

1> [1 | [2 | [3 | []]]].
[1,2,3]

So this part:

[Name | firsts(Tuples)].

becomes:

[Name1 | ReturnValue]

where ReturnValue is what's returned by firsts(Tuples), which is:

[Name2 | ReturnValue]

substituting back into the first result:

[Name1 | [Name2 | ReturnValue]]

Once again, ReturnValue is what's returned by firsts(Tuples), which is:

[Name3 | ReturnValue]

substituting again gives you:

[Name1 | [Name2 | [Name3 | ReturnValue]]]

And, when ReturnValue is an empty list, you get:

[Name1 | [Name2 | [Name3 | [] ]]]

which is exactly what you need to end the list. Compare to:

[1 | [2 | [3 | [] ]]].

Another way to do the recursion, which is generally easier to figure out, is to use an accumulator:

-module(my).
-compile([export_all]).

firsts(List) ->
    firsts(List, []).  % Add an empty list to the function call

firsts([Tuple|Tuples], Names) -> % The empty list gets assigned to Names
    {Name, _Amount} = Tuple,
    firsts(Tuples, [Name|Names]);
firsts([], Names) ->
    lists:reverse(Names).

Names is known as an accumulator because it is used to accumulate the results that you want to return. Often instead of calling the variable Names, you will see it called Acc (for accumulator).

Note that these two lines:

firsts([Tuple|Tuples], Names) ->
    {Name, _Amount} = Tuple,
    ...

are normally combined into one line like this:

firsts([{Name, _Amount}|Tuples], Names) ->

For example, matching like this works:

27> [{Name, Amount}|Tuples] = [{jane, 250}, {bob, 100}, {kat, 150}].
[{jane,250},{bob,100},{kat,150}]

28> Name.
jane

which means the first solution becomes:

firsts([]) -> [];
firsts([{Name, _Amount}|Tuples]) ->
    [Name | firsts(Tuples)].

and the second solution becomes:

firsts(List) ->
    firsts(List, []).  % Add an empty list to the function call

firsts([{Name, _Amount}|Tuples], Names) -> % The empty list gets assigned to Names
    firsts(Tuples, [Name|Names]);
firsts([], Names) ->
    lists:reverse(Names).

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