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I trying to use the memfd_create syscall in my C code. I tried to include sys/memfd.h as the man page for memfd_create says is appropriate, but GCC gibes me the error "sys/memfd: No such file or directory".

I've tried Googling around and couldn't find anyone having the same problem. I noticed some versions of the manpage for memfd_create say that I should include sys.mman.h, but it didn't seem to help when I tried it. It would say memfd_create was implicitly declared.

Here is a minimal reproduction of my problem.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <ctype.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>

#include <sys/mman.h>

#include <sys/memfd.h>



int main(){

        int fd;
        fd = memfd_create("test", MFD_CLOEXEC);

        return 0;
}

I expect the above code to compile and run without error.

2 Answers 2

4

On older systems, you'll have to include linux/memfd.h for the MFD_ defines, and call memfd_create() via the the syscall(2) wrapper (and include unistd.h and sys/syscall.h for it work).

#define _GNU_SOURCE
#include <unistd.h>
#include <sys/syscall.h>
#include <linux/memfd.h>
#include <err.h>
int main(void){
        int fd;
        if((fd = syscall(SYS_memfd_create, "test", MFD_CLOEXEC)) == -1)
                err(1, "memfd_create");
        return 0;
}
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The Ubuntu man-pages in Bionic (18.04) are not up to date with this API (including its implementation in Bionic).

The Focal man-page correctly shows how to include memfd_create(). It says:

#define _GNU_SOURCE         /* See feature_test_macros(7) */
#include <sys/mman.h>

So you only need to include <sys/mman.h>, and you need to build with -D_GNU_SOURCE in your compiler flags. Or, do as the man page says and literally #define _GNU_SOURCE before including the header. However, I recommend just compiling with -D_GNU_SOURCE instead.

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  • that does not work on "older" systems, like debian stable (9.9).
    – mosvy
    Jun 16, 2019 at 5:13
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    or centos 7. And yes, the manpage wrongly tells you to include sys/memfd.h on such systems, so teaching one how to type man memfd_create really is a bit rich.
    – mosvy
    Jun 16, 2019 at 5:25
  • @mosvy What's "rich" is telling people who're trying to help that what they do "is a bit rich." The question is tagged "ubuntu", and this is a possible answer. If it solves the OP's question, great. If not, then it won't.
    – Nikos C.
    Jun 16, 2019 at 6:16
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    @NikosC. This worked! Thanks so much for your help! Coincidentally, I seem to remember coming across your answers before (maybe several times) so I really appreciate your contributions. May I ask why you prefer compiling with -D_GNU_SOURCE over putting the define in the code?
    – chillsauce
    Jun 18, 2019 at 0:40
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    @chillsauce Because it avoids the problem of some other header including it first without defining the macro on some systems with a different glibc version. This can result in build failures. Defining it with a compiler flag avoids the issue. You'll find that most projects that depend on GNU and/or Linux, POSIX, SystemV or BSD specific library functions usually build with -D_GNU_SOURCE -D_SVID_SOURCE -D_DEFAULT_SOURCE.
    – Nikos C.
    Jun 18, 2019 at 4:40

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