31

In the above xml sample I would like to select all the books that belong to class foo and not in class bar by using xpath.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="ISO-8859-1"?>
<bookstore>
  <book class="foo">
    <title lang="en">Harry Potter</title>
    <author>J K. Rowling</author>
    <year>2005</year>
    <price>29.99</price>
  </book>
  <book class="foo bar">
    <title lang="en">Harry Potter</title>
    <author>J K. Rowling</author>
    <year>2005</year>
    <price>29.99</price>
  </book>
  <book class="foo bar">
    <title lang="en">Harry Potter</title>
    <author>J K. Rowling</author>
    <year>2005</year>
    <price>29.99</price>
  </book>
</bookstore>
1
  • 2
    Good question, +1. See my answer for two different XPath 2.0 solutions of which the first might be the most efficient of them all especially with a non-optimizing XPath 2.0 engine. – Dimitre Novatchev Apr 17 '11 at 1:11
37

By padding the @class value with leading and trailing spaces, you can test for the presence of " foo " and " bar " and not worry about whether it was first, middle, or last, and any false positive hits on "food" or "barren" @class values:

/bookstore/book[contains(concat(' ',@class,' '),' foo ')
        and not(contains(concat(' ',@class,' '),' bar '))]
2
  • 1
    What if @class contains tab or even new-line character instead of space. Here comes handy the normalize-space function (XPath 1.0) that strips the leading and trailing white-space from a string, replaces sequences of whitespace characters by a single space, e.g. concat(' ',normalize-space(@class),' ') – Steven Pribilinskiy Mar 1 '15 at 9:27
  • @Steven Pribilinskiy - That should not be necessary. Due to how attribute values are normalized by the XML parser, tabs and carriage returns will have already been normalized into a space. w3.org/TR/xml/#AVNormalize – Mads Hansen Mar 1 '15 at 15:48
11

Although I like Mads solution: Here is another approach for XPath 2.0:

/bookstore/book[
                 tokenize(@class," ")="foo" 
                 and not(tokenize(@class," ")="bar")
               ]

Please note that the following expressions are both true:

("foo","bar")="foo" -> true
("foo","bar")="bar" -> true
1
  • +1 for the XPath 2.0 solution. So many things are easier with 2.0. – Mads Hansen Apr 14 '11 at 11:58
4

XPath 2.0:

/*/*[for $s in concat(' ',@class,' ') 
            return 
               matches($s, ' foo ') 
             and 
              not(matches($s, ' bar '))
      ]

Here no tokenization is done and $s is calculated only once.

Or even:

/*/book[@class
          [every $t in tokenize(.,' ') satisfies $t ne 'bar']
          [some  $t in tokenize(.,' ') satisfies $t eq 'foo']
       ]
0

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.