2

I'm try to get data from SQL using LIKE successful to get data but the result more than I need

Here is my some data

apple1
apple2
apple3
applejuice1
applej1
applej2

My query:

select * from apple where name like '%applej%'

Currently I got:

applejuice1
applej1
applej2

My Expected output:

applej1
applej2
  • Is like 'applej_' ok? – forpas Jun 17 at 6:52
  • There are some answers involving using regular expressions. While that is useful for complex matching, I still would advise to use the LIKE operator's _ wildcard character when possible. Regex expressions can be a performance killer and I am not sure if regex expressions can be used by indexes as well. (I know the LIKE operator can often make use of indexes, which is very preferrable.) – Bart Hofland Jun 17 at 7:03
  • Can you explain that further? What do you mean by that "special character" in your title? – Nico Haase Jun 17 at 7:16
3

Using REGEXP this is possbile:

select * 
from apple 
where `name` REGEXP '^applej[0-9]'

Demo on db<>fiddle.


Update:

If the name has data as applej1, applej2, applej15, applej109, the following query will work:

select * 
from apple 
where `name` REGEXP '^applej[0-9]+'

Demo on db<>fiddle

4

You can try this,

SELECT * FROM apple where name LIKE '%applej_'

'_' is used to represent a single character in SQL server. For MS Access you can try this

SELECT * FROM apple where name LIKE '*applej?'
  • i don't want applejuice1, but your sql will return it – Tommy Tang Jun 17 at 7:10
  • @TommyTang I doubt that very much... SELECT * FROM apple where name LIKE '%applej_' should work just fine. (It works fine on my MariaDB instance, at least...) – Bart Hofland Jun 17 at 7:19
  • but if my data are applej1, applej15? – Tommy Tang Jun 17 at 7:24
  • @TommyTang Yes, then it becomes more complex. The _ wildcard represents just a single character, so to match 15, you would need to use two of them. But that would also match 1a, for example. And if you want to match apple123456 with 'apple______', it will include applejuice1 again. Here, you probably want to use a regex indeed. – Bart Hofland Jun 17 at 7:27
  • @TommyTang if you want to get applej15 or any two digit integer after applej you can use SELECT * FROM apple where name LIKE '%applej[0-9][0-9]' or if you dont want to use any alphabets after applej you can do that using 'applej[^a-z]' ([] represents single character) – ritheesh Jun 17 at 7:42
2

You can use a regular expression, this will include all rows containing 'applej' + 0 or 1 more character

SELECT * FROM test WHERE  col1 REGEXP '^applej.?$'

This one will find all rows containing 'applej' + exactly 1 more character

SELECT * FROM test WHERE  col1 REGEXP '^applej.{1}$'

And if the number after 'applej' might contain several digits

SELECT * FROM test WHERE  col1 REGEXP '^applej[0-9]+$'

Of course maybe the LIKE suggested by @forpas in the comments above is all you need

0

i found the solution with

SELECT * FROM apple WHERE MATCH(name) AGAINST('applej')

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