34

I need to implement a lot of derived classes with different const member data. The data processing should be handled in the base class, but I can't find an elegant way to access the derived data. The code below is working, but I really don't like it.

The code needs to run in a small embedded environment so extensive usage of the heap or fancy libraries like Boost is no option.

class Base
{
  public:
    struct SomeInfo
    {
        const char *name;
        const f32_t value;
    };

    void iterateInfo()
    {
        // I would love to just write
        // for(const auto& info : c_myInfo) {...}

        u8_t len = 0;
        const auto *returnedInfo = getDerivedInfo(len);
        for (int i = 0; i < len; i++)
        {
            DPRINTF("Name: %s - Value: %f \n", returnedInfo[i].name, returnedInfo[i].value);
        }
    }
    virtual const SomeInfo* getDerivedInfo(u8_t &length) = 0;
};

class DerivedA : public Base
{
  public:
    const SomeInfo c_myInfo[2] { {"NameA1", 1.1f}, {"NameA2", 1.2f} };

    virtual const SomeInfo* getDerivedInfo(u8_t &length) override
    {
        // Duplicated code in every derived implementation....
        length = sizeof(c_myInfo) / sizeof(c_myInfo[0]);
        return c_myInfo;
    }
};

class DerivedB : public Base
{
  public:
    const SomeInfo c_myInfo[3] { {"NameB1", 2.1f}, {"NameB2", 2.2f}, {"NameB2", 2.3f} };

    virtual const SomeInfo *getDerivedInfo(u8_t &length) override
    {
        // Duplicated code in every derived implementation....
        length = sizeof(c_myInfo) / sizeof(c_myInfo[0]);
        return c_myInfo;
    }
};

DerivedA instanceA;
DerivedB instanceB;
instanceA.iterateInfo();
instanceB.iterateInfo();
  • No, I only instanciate the derived classes. – SirNobbyNobbs Jun 17 at 8:47
  • @NikosC.Base is abstract, can't create instances of it. – Tanveer Badar Jun 17 at 8:47
  • 4
    If SomeInfo c_myInfo[3] is const and has a compile-time constant initializer, why do you have it inside the object instead of static? Do you only create one instance of each type, so there isn't actually duplication of the pointers + floats? (Also a string key/value array doesn't sound great for efficiency if you're using it as a dictionary, but that's a separate issue. Sounds like a job for enum..) – Peter Cordes Jun 17 at 20:54
  • 2
    Thanks for all the suggestions! So far, Nikos C. answer best suits my needs although Peter Cordes approach is also neat and simple. Just some clarifications: 1) Several users suggested to make c_myInfo static const and they are correct of course. 2) My embedded environment isn´t so small that I have to count every bit and byte. I just don´t want to compile some extra 10 kB on libraries if it can be avoided. Readability is more important than code efficiency. – SirNobbyNobbs Jun 19 at 6:49
35

You don't need any virtuals or templates here. Just add a SomeInfo* pointer and its length to Base, and provide a protected constructor to initialize them (and since there's no default constructor, it won't be possible to forget to initialize them).

The constructor being protected is not a hard requirement, but since Base is not an abstract base class anymore, making the constructor protected prevents Base from being instantiated.

class Base
{
public:
    struct SomeInfo
    {
        const char *name;
        const f32_t value;
    };

    void iterateInfo()
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < c_info_len; ++i) {
            DPRINTF("Name: %s - Value: %f \n", c_info[i].name,
                     c_info[i].value);
        }
    }

protected:
    explicit Base(const SomeInfo* info, int len) noexcept
        : c_info(info)
        , c_info_len(len)
    { }

private:
    const SomeInfo* c_info;
    int c_info_len;
};

class DerivedA : public Base
{
public:
    DerivedA() noexcept
        : Base(c_myInfo, sizeof(c_myInfo) / sizeof(c_myInfo[0]))
    { }

private:
    const SomeInfo c_myInfo[2] { {"NameA1", 1.1f}, {"NameA2", 1.2f} };
};

class DerivedB : public Base
{
public:
    DerivedB() noexcept
        : Base(c_myInfo, sizeof(c_myInfo) / sizeof(c_myInfo[0]))
    { }

private:
    const SomeInfo c_myInfo[3] {
        {"NameB1", 2.1f},
        {"NameB2", 2.2f},
        {"NameB2", 2.3f}
    };
};

You can of course use a small, zero-overhead wrapper/adapter class instead of the c_info and c_info_len members in order to provide nicer and safer access (like begin() and end() support), but that's outside the scope of this answer.

As Peter Cordes pointed out, one issue with this approach is that the derived objects are now larger by the size of a pointer plus the size of an int if your final code still uses virtuals (virtual functions you haven't showed in your post.) If there's no virtuals anymore, then object size is only going to increase by an int. You did say that you're on a small embedded environment, so if a lot of these objects are going to be alive at the same time, then this might be something to worry about.

Peter also pointed out that since your c_myInfo arrays are const and use constant initializers, you might as well make them static. This will reduce the size of each derived object by the size of the array.

  • 1
    This grows the size of every object by 1 pointer + 1 int. If you have many more instances of these objects than you do derived types, the OP's solution uses less total memory (data + code). They mention they're in a memory-constrained embedded environment. On a high-end system, the extra level of indirection is still a downside. (At least the pointer will typically be in the same cache line as the start of the data and the vtable pointer, so the extra latency is just 1 L1d cache ~load-use latency. Not an extra cache miss) – Peter Cordes Jun 17 at 20:46
  • 1
    @PeterCordes: Note that the OPs solution grows the size of every object by ??? due to the virtual methods. That's probably 1 pointer, but it's worth noting that the size regression is smaller than it first appears. This also has fewer indirections, since we can directly deference the given pointer, wheras the OP's code has to dereference the virtual method, then call that to get a pointer, then dereference the pointer. – Mooing Duck Jun 18 at 0:31
  • @MooingDuck: (successful) Branch prediction / speculation hides the latency of the function pointer, but yes it's a pretty terrible choice if you don't need polymorphism. It's plausible that polymorphism merely for the purpose of code-reuse is worth it if they're very memory-constrained, but likely having callers that statically know the type pass the right args to generic functions is the way to go, maybe by writing simple non-virtual inline helper functions that pass a pointer+size at each call site, or whatever other way you get a C++ compiler to emit machine code that does that. – Peter Cordes Jun 18 at 0:37
  • @PeterCordes That's a good point. I updated the answer. – Nikos C. Jun 18 at 5:07
  • @PeterCordes: "small embedded environments" usually do not feature performance enhancing logic such as "Branch prediction / speculation" because it would add significantly to the transistor count (affecting cost, size, and power consumption) – Ben Voigt Jun 18 at 5:28
13

You could make Base a template and take the length of your const array. Something like this:

template<std::size_t Length>
class Base
{
  public:
    struct SomeInfo
    {
        const char *name;
        const float value;
    };

    const SomeInfo c_myInfo[Length];

    void iterateInfo()
    {
        //I would love to just write
        for(const auto& info : c_myInfo) {
            // work with info
        }
    }
};

And then initialize the array accordingly from each base class:

class DerivedA : public Base<2>
{
  public:
    DerivedA() : Base<2>{ SomeInfo{"NameA1", 1.1f}, {"NameA2", 1.2f} } {}
};

class DerivedB : public Base<3>
{
  public:
    DerivedB() : Base<3>{ SomeInfo{"NameB1", 2.1f}, {"NameB2", 2.2f}, {"NameB2", 2.3f} } {}
};

And then use as you normally would. This method removes the polymorphism and uses no heap allocation (e.g. no std::vector), just as user SirNobbyNobbs requested.

  • 1
    To save code size, make iterateInfo a non-member function that takes a pointer + Length as function args, and give the derived classes simple inline functions that do iterateInfo(c_myInfo, Length); So the loop has one shared implementation and callers just pass it args. Unfortunately I don't think putting it in the base class would get most compilers to only make one definition, unless they use identical code folding optimizations to merge identical function definitions. – Peter Cordes Jun 18 at 5:56
8

Okay then let's simplify all the unnecessary complications :)

Your code really boils down to the following:

SomeInfo.h

struct SomeInfo
{
    const char *name;
    const f32_t value;
};

void processData(const SomeInfo* c_myInfo, u8_t len);

SomeInfo.cpp

#include "SomeInfo.h"

void processData(const SomeInfo* c_myInfo, u8_t len)
{
    for (u8_t i = 0; i < len; i++)
    {
        DPRINTF("Name: %s - Value: %f \n", c_myInfo[i].name, c_myInfo[i].value);
    }
}

data.h

#include "SomeInfo.h"

struct A
{
    const SomeInfo info[2] { {"NameA1", 1.1f}, {"NameA2", 1.2f} };
    static const u8_t len = 2;
};

struct B
{
    const SomeInfo info[3] { {"NameB1", 2.1f}, {"NameB2", 2.2f}, {"NameB2", 2.3f} };
    static const u8_t len = 3;
};

main.cpp

#include "data.h"

int
main()
{
    A a;
    B b;
    processData(a.info, A::len);
    processData(b.info, B::len);
}
  • Given the provided example you are right.But this is just a simplification to highlight my problem. The base class is already several hundred lines of code and every derived class also has much more inside than just the const info. – SirNobbyNobbs Jun 17 at 9:38
  • 6
    Well, I can imagine. All I can suggest is to use composition instead of inheritance along with simple functions. Coding can be a simple and pleasurable experience. We just complicate everything for some reason :) – Adam Zahran Jun 17 at 9:42
  • 3
    @SirNobbyNobbs "The base class is already several hundred lines of code" - That is more of a code smell than anything that your simplified example might highlight, – Goyo Jun 17 at 19:43
  • 3
    There's no point having a u8_t len = 3; member in each struct; the length of the info[] array member is already statically known as part of the derived type. @SirNobbyNobbs: What you could do is have a small inline wrapper in each of A and B that passes the right args to a common processData function. It can be virtual if you need it to be, but letting it inline into each call site when you have full type info is good. (final on the derived type functions allows that in more cases.) – Peter Cordes Jun 17 at 21:08
  • 1
    If you want to require callers to manually inline, instead of writing a wrapper function, then make it static const int len; The u8 will probably end up still costing you 4 bytes, because it's inside a struct that will get 4-byte alignment (assuming alignof(float) = 4. So the struct size will be a multiple of 4 bytes, because compilers always pad structs to a multiple of their alignof(), so in an array all the elements have correct alignment. – Peter Cordes Jun 17 at 21:51
7

You can use CRTP:

template<class Derived>
class impl_getDerivedInfo
  :public Base
{

    virtual const SomeInfo *getDerivedInfo(u8_t &length) override
    {
        //Duplicated code in every derived implementation....
        auto& self = static_cast<Derived&>(*this);
        length = sizeof(self.c_myInfo) / sizeof(self.c_myInfo[0]);
        return self.c_myInfo;
    }
};


class DerivedA : public impl_getDerivedInfo<DerivedA>
{
  public:
    const SomeInfo c_myInfo[2] { {"NameA1", 1.1f}, {"NameA2", 1.2f} };
};

class DerivedB : public impl_getDerivedInfo<DerivedB>
{
  public:
    const SomeInfo c_myInfo[3] { {"NameB1", 2.1f}, {"NameB2", 2.2f}, {"NameB2", 2.3f} };

};
  • Does getDerivedInfo still need to be virtual here? Also you could turn the duplicated code into just a simple caller for a base-class generic function that takes pointer + length. That would give you clean syntax for a way to get the compiler to pass pointer+length to a common non-duplicated implementation. – Peter Cordes Jun 18 at 0:41
  • 1
    @PeterCordes I suppose getDerivedInfo must be virtual because this is the assumption done in the question (Objects are accessed though expression of type Base). The generic function would be so short that it will be inlined whatsoever, resulting in the same code (the expression that initialize length is a constant expression). Virtualization could be implemented by hand, like in the NikosC. answer, in a memory efficient way, but the compiler will not any more be able to perform devirtualization. – Oliv Jun 18 at 5:52
  • @PeterCordes What is laking to the language is a way to express that a specific non-static data member value in a base class is the same for all object that have the same dynamic type. – Oliv Jun 18 at 5:52
6

Start with a vocabulary type:

template<class T>
struct span {
  T* b = nullptr;
  T* e = nullptr;

  // these all do something reasonable:
  span()=default;
  span(span const&)=default;
  span& operator=(span const&)=default;

  // pair of pointers, or pointer and length:
  span( T* s, T* f ):b(s), e(f) {}
  span( T* s, size_t l ):span(s, s+l) {}

  // construct from an array of known length:
  template<size_t N>
  span( T(&arr)[N] ):span(arr, N) {}

  // Pointers are iterators:
  T* begin() const { return b; }
  T* end() const { return e; }

  // extended container-like utility functions:
  T* data() const { return begin(); }
  size_t size() const { return end()-begin(); }
  bool empty() const { return size()==0; }
  T& front() const { return *begin(); }
  T& back() const { return *(end()-1); }
};

// This is just here for the other array ctor,
// a span of const int can be constructed from
// an array of non-const int.
template<class T>
struct span<T const> {
  T const* b = nullptr;
  T const* e = nullptr;
  span( T const* s, T const* f ):b(s), e(f) {}
  span( T const* s, size_t l ):span(s, s+l) {}
  template<size_t N>
  span( T const(&arr)[N] ):span(arr, N) {}
  template<size_t N>
  span( T(&arr)[N] ):span(arr, N) {}
  T const* begin() const { return b; }
  T const* end() const { return e; }
  size_t size() const { return end()-begin(); }
  bool empty() const { return size()==0; }
  T const& front() const { return *begin(); }
  T const& back() const { return *(end()-1); }
};

this type has been introduced to C++ std (with slight differences) via the GSL. The basic vocabulary type above is enough if you don't already have it.

A span represents a "pointer" to a block of contiguous objects of known length.

Now we can talk about a span<char>:

class Base
{
public:
  void iterateInfo()
  {
    for(const auto& info : c_mySpan) {
        DPRINTF("Name: %s - Value: %f \n", info.name, info.value);
    }
  }
private:
  span<const char> c_mySpan;
  Base( span<const char> s ):c_mySpan(s) {}
  Base(Base const&)=delete; // probably unsafe
};

Now your derived looks like:

class DerivedA : public Base
{
public:
  const SomeInfo c_myInfo[2] { {"NameA1", 1.1f}, {"NameA2", 1.2f} };
  DerivedA() : Base(c_myInfo) {}
};

This has overhead of two pointers per Base. A vtable uses one pointer, makes your type abstract, adds indirection, and adds one global vtable per Derived type.

Now, in theory, you could get the overhead of this down to the length of the array, and presume that the array data starts right after Base, but that is fragile, non-portable and only useful if desperate.

While you may be rightly leery of templates in embedded code (as you should be of any kind of code generation; code generation means you can generate more than O(1) binary from O(1) code). The span vocabulary type is compact and should be inlined to nothing if your compiler settings are reasonably aggressive.

5

How about CRTP + std::array? No extra variables, v-ptr or virtual function calls. std::array is a very thin wrapper around C style array. Empty base class optimization ensures no space is wasted. It looks "elegant" enough to me :)

template<typename Derived>
class BaseT
{
  public:   
    struct SomeInfo
    {
        const char *name;
        const f32_t value;
    };

    void iterateInfo()
    {
        Derived* pDerived = static_cast<Derived*>(this);
        for (const auto& i: pDerived->c_myInfo)
        {
            printf("Name: %s - Value: %f \n", i.name, i.value);
        }
    }
};

class DerivedA : public BaseT<DerivedA>
{
  public:
    const std::array<SomeInfo,2> c_myInfo { { {"NameA1", 1.1f}, {"NameA2", 1.2f} } };
};

class DerivedB : public BaseT<DerivedB>
{
  public:
    const std::array<SomeInfo, 3> c_myInfo { { {"NameB1", 2.1f}, {"NameB2", 2.2f}, {"NameB2", 2.3f} } };
};
4

So if you really want to keep your data organised the way it is, and I can see why you would in real life:

One way with C++17 would be to return a "view" object representing your content list. This can then be used in a C++11 for statement. You could write a base function that converts start+len into a view, so you don't need to add to the virtual method cruft.

It is not that difficult to create a view object that is compatible with C++11 for statement. Alternatively, you could consider using the C++98 for_each templates that can take a begin and end iterator: Your start iterator is start; the end iterator is start+len.

3

You can move your data into a two-dimensional array outside of the classes and have each class return an index which contains relevant data.

struct SomeInfo
{
    const char *name;
    const f32_t value;
};

const vector<vector<SomeInfo>> masterStore{
    {{"NameA1", 1.1f}, {"NameA2", 1.2f}},
    {{"NameB1", 2.1f}, {"NameB2", 2.2f}, {"NameB2", 2.3f}}
    };

class Base
{
  public:
    void iterateInfo()
    {
        // I would love to just write
        // for(const auto& info : c_myInfo) {...}

        u8_t len = 0;
        auto index(getIndex());
        for(const auto& data : masterStore[index])
        {
            DPRINTF("Name: %s - Value: %f \n", data.name, data.value);
        }
    }
    virtual int getIndex() = 0;
};

class DerivedA : public Base
{
  public:

    int getIndex() override
    {
        return 0;
    }
};

class DerivedB : public Base
{
  public:

    int getIndex() override
    {
        return 1;
    }
};

DerivedA instanceA;
DerivedB instanceB;
instanceA.iterateInfo();
instanceB.iterateInfo();
  • 3
    Why a const std::vector for compile-time-constant data with known fixed size? Seems like a job for a flat 1D std::array<SomeInfo> with each derived class knowing the right start index + offset. (GetIndex returns a std::pair<int,int>). Or a std::array<std::vector<SomeInfo>>. Or maybe implicit lengths by using a flat array of SomeInfo objects with nullptr terminators for the end of each sub-array, if you only ever want to iterate in order. – Peter Cordes Jun 17 at 21:00
  • OP didn't share full code so it is a coin toss either way about whether the data is compile time constant or not. – Tanveer Badar Jun 18 at 8:42
  • Ok, but there's definitely zero point using vector<vector<T>> over array<vector<T>>. The outer array is definitely fixed-size because it has 1 entry per derived type. – Peter Cordes Jun 18 at 15:49
3

Just make the virtual function return a reference to the data directly (you need to change to vector then - not possible with array or C style array types with different sizes):

virtual const std::vector<SomeInfo>& getDerivedInfo() = 0;

or if pointers are the only feasible option, as a pointer range (iterators/range adapter would be preferred though if possible - more on that):

virtual std::pair<SomeInfo*, SomeInfo*> getDerivedInfo() = 0;

To make this last method work with range-based for loop: one way is to make a small 'range view' type that has the functions begin()/end() - essential a pair with begin()/end()

Example:

template<class T>
struct ptr_range {
  std::pair<T*, T*> range_;
  auto begin(){return range_.first;}
  auto end(){return range_.second;}
};

Then construct it with:

virtual ptr_range<SomeInfo> getDerivedInfo() override
{
    return {std::begin(c_myInfo), std::end(c_myInfo)};
}

It is easy to make it non-template if a template is not desired.

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