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Is there a way to manually exit a trio infinite loop, like the echo client in the trio tutorial, https://trio.readthedocs.io/en/latest/tutorial.html#an-echo-client , other than using Ctrl-C or using timeouts?

My idea is to use call the echo client from another python script, and be able to close it too with the same python script, arbitrarily. I was thinking of using a flag (maybe event?) as a switch to trigger the cancel_scope.cancel() in the nursery. But I don't know how to trigger the switch. Below is my attempt at modifying the tutorial echo client code.

import sys
import trio

PORT = 12345
BUFSIZE = 16384
FLAG = 1 # FLAG is a global variable

async def sender(client_stream):
    print("sender: started")
    while FLAG:
        data = b'async can sometimes be confusing but I believe in you!'
        print(f"sender: sending {data}")
        await client_stream.send_all(data)
        await trio.sleep(1)

async def receiver(client_stream):
    print("recevier: started!")
    while FLAG:
        data = await client_stream.receive_some(BUFSIZE)
        print(f"receiver: got data {data}")
        if not data:
            print("receiver: connection closed")
            sys.exit()

async def checkflag(nursery): # function to trigger cancel()
    global FLAG
    if not FLAG:
        nursery.cancel_scope.cancel()
    else:
        # keep this task running if not triggered, but how to trigger it, 
        # without Ctrl-C or timeout?
        await trio.sleep(1) 

async def parent():
    print(f"parent: connecting to 127.0.0.1:{PORT}")
    client_stream = await trio.open_tcp_stream("127.0.0.1", PORT)
    async with client_stream:
        async with trio.open_nursery() as nursery:
            print("parent: spawning sender ...")
            nursery.start_soon(sender, client_stream)

            print("parent: spawning receiver ...")
            nursery.start_soon(receiver, client_stream)

            print("parent: spawning checkflag...")
            nursery.start_soon(checkflag, nursery)

        print('Close nursery...')
    print("Close stream...")

trio.run(parent)

I find that I am unable to input any commands into the python REPL after trio.run(), to manually change the FLAG, and am wondering if I call this echo client from another script, how exactly to trigger the cancel_scope.cancel() in the nursery? Or is there a better way? Really appreciate all help. Thanks.

2

If you want to use input from the keyboard to exit, here's a solution for Linux and Mac OS X. You could use the Python msvcrt module to do something similar on Windows.

I copied echo-client.py from the Trio tutorial and put a "NEW" comment over the three added blocks of code. From the REPL, you can type 'q' to cancel the nursery scope and exit:

# -- NEW
import termios, tty

import sys
import trio

PORT = 12345
BUFSIZE = 16384

# -- NEW
async def keyboard():
    """Return an iterator of characters from stdin."""
    stashed_term = termios.tcgetattr(sys.stdin)
    try:
        tty.setcbreak(sys.stdin, termios.TCSANOW)
        while True:
            yield await trio.run_sync_in_worker_thread(
                sys.stdin.read, 1,
                cancellable=True
            )
    finally:
        termios.tcsetattr(sys.stdin, termios.TCSANOW, stashed_term)

async def sender(client_stream):
    print("sender: started!")
    while True:
        data = b"async can sometimes be confusing, but I believe in you!"
        print("sender: sending {!r}".format(data))
        await client_stream.send_all(data)
        await trio.sleep(1)

async def receiver(client_stream):
    print("receiver: started!")
    while True:
        data = await client_stream.receive_some(BUFSIZE)
        print("receiver: got data {!r}".format(data))
        if not data:
            print("receiver: connection closed")
            sys.exit()

async def parent():
    print("parent: connecting to 127.0.0.1:{}".format(PORT))
    client_stream = await trio.open_tcp_stream("127.0.0.1", PORT)
    async with client_stream:
        async with trio.open_nursery() as nursery:
            print("parent: spawning sender...")
            nursery.start_soon(sender, client_stream)

            print("parent: spawning receiver...")
            nursery.start_soon(receiver, client_stream)

            # -- NEW
            async for key in keyboard():
                if key == 'q':
                    nursery.cancel_scope.cancel()

trio.run(parent)

The call to tty.setcbreak puts the terminal in unbuffered mode so you don't have to press return before the program receives input. It also prevents characters from being echoed to the screen. Furthermore, as the name implies, it allows Ctrl-C to work as normal.

In the finally block, termios.tcsetattr restores the terminal to whatever mode it was in before tty.setcbreak. So your terminal is back to normal on exit.

sys.stdin.read is spawned in a separate thread because it needs to run in blocking mode (not good in an async context). The reason is that stdin shares its file description with stdout and stderr. Setting stdin to non-blocking would also set stdout to non-blocking as a side effect, and that might cause issues with the print function (truncation in my case).

Inter-process communication

Here's a basic example of cancelling one Trio process from another with a socket:

# infinite_loop.py    
import trio    

async def task():     
    while True:       
        print("ping")    
        await trio.sleep(0.5)    

async def quitter(cancel_scope):      
    async def quit(server_stream):    
        await server_stream.receive_some(1024)    
        cancel_scope.cancel()    
    await trio.serve_tcp(quit, 12346)    

async def main():    
    async with trio.open_nursery() as nursery:    
        nursery.start_soon(task)    
        nursery.start_soon(quitter, nursery.cancel_scope)    

trio.run(main)
# slayer.py        
import trio    

async def main():    
    async with await trio.open_tcp_stream("127.0.0.1", 12346) as s:
        await trio.sleep(3)    
        await s.send_all(b'quit')    

trio.run(main)
  • The key thing to notice here: once you have some code running inside some Trio task that has decided to kill the server, it can just do nursery.cancel_scope.cancel(). All the tricky stuff is in figuring out whether a key has been pressed. Eventually Trio will have an easier way to do this, but console input is super complicated, so it may be a bit before it gets implemented: github.com/python-trio/trio/issues/174 – Nathaniel J. Smith Jun 18 at 1:59
  • Thank you for your code, it works flawlessly. But if I want to trigger the cancel from another script (from another process), do I need to spawn a separate thread here also? – cloud ostrich Jun 19 at 1:41
  • If you have two processes running in paralell, you will need to use more generic inter-process communication (IPC) techniques. The Trio even loop runs in a single thread, and the closest it gets to IPC is trio.BlockingTrioPortal, which allows direct inter-thread communication. In this case, I would spawn another task in the nursery that listens on a socket for q "quit" message (similar to the keyboard above). I'll edit my answer when I get some time. – Zach Thompson Jun 19 at 15:52
  • Thank you so much! This is exactly what I need! – cloud ostrich Jun 20 at 15:17
1

There are lots of ways you could do this. Why not just use Ctrl-C? Seems perfectly valid to me.

If you really don't want to use Ctrl-C, then you are going to need a functions that listens for input and updates FLAG (or just exits the program directly; I don't think you need the FLAG logic here at all to be honest).

For example, you could have a function that polls from a file / reads from db / listens for terminal input etc. and have this run in parallel. The listener should run as a separate worker in the same Python script. But depending how you choose to do this, the function that changes the external input can be an independent script

  • Thank you kindly for your reply. Like to ask, how to write a function to listen for terminal input? Is it through the subprocess module? – cloud ostrich Jun 17 at 14:09
  • You don't need to use a subprocess. Try using the input() command. I am not entirely certain how this will work in an asynchronous setup though. – Karl Jun 17 at 16:34

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