5

I am trying to start an NGINX server within a docker container configured through docker-compose. The catch is, however, that I would like to substitute an environment variable inside of the http section, specifically within the "upstream" block.

It would be awesome to have this working, because I have several other containers that are all configured through environment variables, and I have about 5 environments that need to be running at any given time. I have tried using "envsubst" (as suggested by the official NGINX docs), perl_set, and set_by_lua, however none of them appear to be working.

Below is the NGINX config, as it is after my most recent trial

user  nginx;
worker_processes  1;
env NGINXPROXY;

load_module modules/ngx_http_perl_module.so;

error_log  /var/log/nginx/error.log warn;
pid        /var/run/nginx.pid;


events {
    worker_connections  1024;
}

http {
    perl_set $nginxproxy 'sub { return $ENV{"NGINXPROXY"}; }';

    upstream api-upstream {
        server ${nginxproxy};
    }

    include       /etc/nginx/mime.types;
    default_type  application/octet-stream;

    log_format  main  '$remote_addr - $remote_user [$time_local] "$request" '
                      '$status $body_bytes_sent "$http_referer" '
                      '"$http_user_agent" "$http_x_forwarded_for"';

    access_log  /var/log/nginx/access.log  main;

    sendfile        off;
    #tcp_nopush     on;

    keepalive_timeout  65;

    #gzip  on;

    include /etc/nginx/conf.d/*.conf;
}

Below is the NGINX dockerfile

# build stage
FROM node:latest
WORKDIR /app
COPY ./ /app
RUN npm install
RUN npm run build

# production stage
FROM nginx:1.17.0-perl
COPY --from=0 /app/dist /usr/share/nginx/html
RUN apt-get update && apt-get install -y gettext-base
RUN rm /etc/nginx/conf.d/default.conf
RUN rm /etc/nginx/nginx.conf
COPY default.conf /etc/nginx/conf.d
COPY nginx.conf /etc/nginx
RUN mkdir /certs
EXPOSE 80 443
CMD ["nginx", "-g", "daemon off;"]

Below is the section of the docker-compose.yml for the NGINX server (with names and IPs changed). The envsubst command is intentionally commented out at this point in my troubleshooting.

front-end:
        environment:
            - NGINXPROXY=172.31.67.100:9300
        build: http://gitaccount:password@gitserver.com/group/front-end.git#develop
        container_name: qa_front_end
        image: qa-front-end
        restart: always
        networks:
            qa_network:
                ipv4_address: 172.28.0.215
        ports:
            - "9080:80"
        # command: /bin/bash -c "envsubst '$$NGINXPROXY' < /etc/nginx/nginx.conf > /etc/nginx/nginx.conf && nginx -g 'daemon off;'"

What appears to be happening is when I reference the $nginxproxy variable in the upstream block (right after "server"), I get output that makes it look like it's referencing the string literal "$nginxproxy" rather than substituting the value of the variable.

qa3_front_end       | 2019/06/18 12:35:36 [emerg] 1#1: host not found in upstream "${nginx_upstream}" in /etc/nginx/nginx.conf:19
qa3_front_end       | nginx: [emerg] host not found in upstream "${nginx_upstream}" in /etc/nginx/nginx.conf:19
qa3_front_end exited with code 1

When I attempt to use envsubst, I get an error that makes it sound like the command messed with the format of the nginx.conf file

qa3_front_end       | 2019/06/18 12:49:02 [emerg] 1#1: no "events" section in configuration
qa3_front_end       | nginx: [emerg] no "events" section in configuration
qa3_front_end exited with code 1

I'm pretty stuck, so thanks in advance for your help.

11

Since nginx 1.19 you can now use environment variables in your configuration with docker-compose. I used the following setup:

# file: docker/nginx/templates/default.conf.conf
upstream api-upstream {
    server ${API_HOST};
}


# file: docker-compose.yml
services:
    nginx:
        image: nginx:1.19-alpine
        volumes:
            - "./docker/nginx/templates:/etc/nginx/templates/"
        environment:
            NGINX_ENVSUBST_TEMPLATE_SUFFIX: ".conf"
            API_HOST: api.example.com
        

I'm going off script a little from the example in the documentation. Note the extra .conf extension on the template file - this is not a typo. In the docs for the nginx image it is suggested to name the file, for example, default.conf.template. Upon startup, a script will take that file, substitute the environment variables, and then output the file to /etc/nginx/conf.d/ with the original file name, dropping the .template suffix.

By default that suffix is .template, but this breaks syntax highlighting unless you configure your editor. Instead, I specified .conf as the template suffix. If you only name your file default.conf the result will be a file named /etc/nginx/conf.d/default and your site won't be served as expected.

  • Just a quick clarifying point: this file needs to be in the templates directory of the nginx container. If you were using a ./docker/nginx/conf.d/:/etc/nginx/conf.d/ docker compose volume to manage this file, you'll need to change it to ./docker/nginx/templates/:/etc/nginx/templates/ instead – Joseph Marikle Aug 24 '20 at 14:00
  • @JosephMarikle good idea, i've updated the example to reflect your comment – Jody Aug 24 '20 at 16:46
7

You can avoid some of the hassles with Compose interpreting environment variables by defining your own entrypoint. See this simple example:

  • entrypoint.sh (make sure this file is executable)
#!/bin/sh

export NGINXPROXY

envsubst '${NGINXPROXY}' < /config.template > /etc/nginx/nginx.conf

exec "$@"
  • docker-compose.yml
version: "3.7"

services:
    front-end:
        image: nginx
        environment:
            - NGINXPROXY=172.31.67.100:9300
        ports:
            - 80:80
        volumes:
            - ./config:/config.template
            - ./entrypoint.sh:/entrypoint.sh
        entrypoint: ["/entrypoint.sh"]
        command: ["nginx", "-g", "daemon off;"]

My config file has the same content as your nginx.conf, aside from the fact that I had to comment the lines using the Perl module.

Note that I had to mount my config file to another location before I could envsubst it. I encountered some strange behaviour in the form that the file ends up empty after the substitution, which can be avoided by this approach. It shouldn't be a problem in your specific case, because you already embed it in your image on build time.


EDIT

For completeness, to change your setup as little as possible, you just have to make sure that you export your environment variable. Adapt your command like this:

command: ["/bin/bash", "-c", "export NGINXPROXY && envsubst '$$NGINXPROXY' < /etc/nginx/nginx.conf > /etc/nginx/nginx.conf && nginx -g 'daemon off;'"]

...and you should be good to go. I would always recommend the "cleaner" way with defining your own entrypoint, though.

  • 1
    I might COPY this script in the Dockerfile and specify it as the image's ENTRYPOINT, rather than overriding it only at runtime. – David Maze May 21 '20 at 10:55
4

So after some wrestling with this issue, I managed to get it working similarly to the answer provided by bellackn. I am going to post my exact solution here, in case anybody else needs to reference a complete solution.

Step1: Write your nginx.conf or default.conf how you would normally write it. Save the file as "nginx.conf.template", or "default.conf.template" depending on which you are trying to substitute variables into.

user  nginx;
worker_processes  1;

error_log  /var/log/nginx/error.log warn;
pid        /var/run/nginx.pid;


events {
    worker_connections  1024;
}

http {
    upstream api-upstream {
        server 192.168.25.254;
    }

    include       /etc/nginx/mime.types;
    default_type  application/octet-stream;

    log_format  main  '$remote_addr - $remote_user [$time_local] "$request" '
                      '$status $body_bytes_sent "$http_referer" '
                      '"$http_user_agent" "$http_x_forwarded_for"';

    access_log  /var/log/nginx/access.log  main;

    sendfile        off;
    #tcp_nopush     on;

    keepalive_timeout  65;

    #gzip  on;

    include /etc/nginx/conf.d/*.conf;
}

Step2: Substitute a variable in the format ${VARNAME} for whatever value(s) you want to replace with an environment variable:

user  nginx;
worker_processes  1;

error_log  /var/log/nginx/error.log warn;
pid        /var/run/nginx.pid;


events {
    worker_connections  1024;
}

http {
    upstream api-upstream {
        server ${SERVER_NAME};
    }

    include       /etc/nginx/mime.types;
    default_type  application/octet-stream;

    log_format  main  '$remote_addr - $remote_user [$time_local] "$request" '
                      '$status $body_bytes_sent "$http_referer" '
                      '"$http_user_agent" "$http_x_forwarded_for"';

    access_log  /var/log/nginx/access.log  main;

    sendfile        off;
    #tcp_nopush     on;

    keepalive_timeout  65;

    #gzip  on;

    include /etc/nginx/conf.d/*.conf;
}

Step 3: In your docker-file, copy your nginx configuration files (your nginx.conf.template or default.conf.template) into your container at the appropriate location:

# build stage
FROM node:latest
WORKDIR /app
COPY ./ /app
RUN npm install
RUN npm run build

# production stage
FROM nginx:1.17.0-perl
COPY --from=0 /app/dist /usr/share/nginx/html
RUN apt-get update && apt-get install -y gettext-base
RUN rm /etc/nginx/conf.d/default.conf
RUN rm /etc/nginx/nginx.conf
#-----------------------------------#
|COPY default.conf /etc/nginx/conf.d|
|COPY nginx.conf.template /etc/nginx|
#-----------------------------------#
RUN mkdir /certs
EXPOSE 80 443
CMD ["nginx", "-g", "daemon off;"]

Step 4: Set your environment variable in your docker-compos.yml file using the "environment" section label. Make sure your environment variable name matches whatever variable name you chose within your nginx config file. Use the "envsubt" command within your docker container to substitute your variable values in for your variables within your nginx.conf.template, and write the output to a file named nginx.conf in the correct location. This can be done within the docker-compose.yml file by using the "command" section label:

version: '2.0'
services:
    front-end:
        environment:
            - SERVER_NAME=172.31.67.100:9100
        build: http://git-account:git-password@git-server.com/project-group/repository-name.git#branch-ame
        container_name: qa_front_end
        image: qa-front-end-vue
        restart: always
        networks:
            qa_network:
                ipv4_address: 172.28.0.215
        ports:
            - "9080:80"
        command: >
            /bin/sh -c
            "envsubst '
            $${SERVER_NAME}
            '< /etc/nginx/nginx.conf.template
            > /etc/nginx/nginx.conf
            && nginx -g 'daemon off;'"

Step 5: Run your stack with docker-compose up (with whatever additional switches you need) and your nginx server should now start with whatever value you supplied in the "environment" section of your docker-compose.yml

As mentioned in the solution above, you can also define your own entry point, however this solution has also proven to work pretty well, and keeps everything contained into a single configuration file, giving me the ability to run a stack of services directly from git with nothing but a docker-compose.yml file.

A big thank you to everybody who took the time to ready through this, and bellackn for taking the time to help me solve the issue.

0

Like already explained in Jody's answer, nowadays the official Nginx Docker image supports parsing templates. This uses envsubst and its handling ensures not to mess with Nginx variables such as $host and all. Nice. However, envsubst does not support default values like a regular shell and Docker Compose do when using ${MY_VAR:-My Default}. So, this built-in templating would always need a full setup of all variables, even when using the defaults.

To define defaults in the image itself, one can use a custom entrypoint to first set the defaults and then simply delegate to the original entrypoint. Like a docker-defaults.sh:

#!/usr/bin/env sh
set -eu

# As of version 1.19, the official Nginx Docker image supports templates with
# variable substitution. But that uses `envsubst`, which does not allow for
# defaults for missing variables. Here, first use the regular command shell
# to set the defaults:
export PROXY_API_DEST=${PROXY_API_DEST:-http://host.docker.internal:8000/api/}

# Due to `set -u` this would fail if not defined and no default was set above
echo "Will proxy requests for /api/* to ${PROXY_API_DEST}*"

# Next, let the original entry point do its work
/docker-entrypoint.sh "$@"

Along with, say, some docker-nginx-default.conf:

# After variable substitution, this will replace /etc/nginx/conf.d/default.conf
server {
    listen 80;
    listen [::]:80;
    server_name localhost;

    location / {
        root /usr/share/nginx/html;
        index index.html index.htm;
    }

    location /api/ {
       # Proxy API calls to another destination; the default for the variable is
       # set in docker-defaults.sh
       proxy_pass $PROXY_API_DEST;
    }
}

In the Dockerfile copy the template into /etc/nginx/templates/default.conf.template and set the custom entry point:

FROM nginx:stable-alpine

...

# Each time Nginx is started it will perform variable substition in all template
# files found in `/etc/nginx/templates/*.template`, and copy the results (without
# the `.template` suffix) into `/etc/nginx/conf.d/`. Below, this will replace the
# original `/etc/nginx/conf.d/default.conf`; see https://hub.docker.com/_/nginx
COPY docker-nginx-default.conf /etc/nginx/templates/default.conf.template
COPY docker-defaults.sh /
# Just in case the file mode was not properly set in Git
RUN chmod +x /docker-defaults.sh

# This will delegate to the original `docker-entrypoint.sh`
ENTRYPOINT ["/docker-defaults.sh"]

CMD ["nginx", "-g", "daemon off;"]

Now using, e.g., docker run --env PROXY_API_DEST=https://example.com/api/ ... will set a value, which in this example will default to http://host.docker.internal:8000/api/ if not set (which is actually http://localhost:8000/api/ on the local machine).

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