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This question already has an answer here:

Can atoms be removed from a running Erlang/Elixir system?

Specifically, I am interested in how I would create an application server where modules, representing applications, can be loaded and run on demand and later removed.

I suppose it's more complicated than just removing the atom representing the module in question, as it may be defining more atoms which may be difficult or impossible to track.

Alternatively, I wonder if a module can be run in isolation so that all references it produces can be effectively removed from a running system when it is no longer needed.

EDIT: Just to clarify, because SO thinks this question is answered elsewhere, the question does not relate to garbage collection of atoms, but manual management thereof. To further clarify, here is my comment on Alex's answer below:

I have also thought about spinning up separate instances (nodes?) but that would be very expensive for on-demand, per-user applications. What I am trying to do is imitate how an SAP ABAP system works. One option may be to pre-emptively have a certain number of instances running, then restart them each time a request is complete. (Again, pretty expensive though). Another may be to monitor the atom table of an instance and restart that instance when it is close to the limit.

The drawback I see with running several nodes/instances (although that is what an ABAP system has; several OS processes serving requests from users) is that you lose out on the ability to share cached bytecode between those instances. In an ABAP system, the cache of bytecode (which they call a "load") is accessible to the different processes so when a program is started, it checks the cache first before fetching it from storage.

marked as duplicate by Adam Millerchip, Aleksei Matiushkin elixir Jun 19 at 4:35

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  • Do you know about: list_to_existing_atom(String) -> atom() – 7stud Jun 19 at 0:39
  • @7stud I did read about this function elsewhere, but I don't understand how it applies or how that is supposed to help. – mydoghasworms Jun 19 at 4:47
  • Your question is actually about removing the module, not removing the atom that represents module name. Take a look at code module in erts. There are purge/1 and remove/1 functions. – Yuri Ginsburg Jun 24 at 7:31
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Unfortunately not, atoms are not destroyed within the VM at all until the VM shuts down. Atom limits are also shared across processes, meaning that spawning a new process to handle atom allocation/deallocation won't work in your case.

You might have some luck spawning a completely separate VM instance by running a separate Erlang application and communicating to it through sockets, although I'm not sure how effective that will be.

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    I have also thought about spinning up separate instances (nodes?) but that would be very expensive for on-demand, per-user applications. What I am trying to do is imitate how an SAP ABAP system works. One option may be to pre-emptively have a certain number of instances running, then restart them each time a request is complete. (Again, pretty expensive though). Another may be to monitor the atom table of an instance and restart that instance when it is close to the limit. – mydoghasworms Jun 19 at 4:53
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    You could also increase the amount of atoms allowed per instance. As long as your environment has enough memory to hold these atoms everything should be fine – Alex Dovzhanyn Jun 19 at 17:48

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