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I'm writing an R program to analyze a tree structure. In my example below, there are 10 nodes in the tree, and each node's ancestors (the parents of that node, and the parents of the parents of that node, etc..), are stored in a list called Ancestors. The user will query a vector of node names, and I'm trying to create a list that will be populated with the ancestors of that query. Each item in the list will contain a list of the query descendents for each of the ancestors called. Please see below for an example

Let's say I have the following structure.

enter image description here So the list Ancestors would look like this

Ancestors <- list()
Ancestors$'p1' <- c('p2', 'p3', 'p4', 'p5', 'p8', 'p9', 'p10')
Ancestors$'p2' <- c('p4', 'p5', 'p8', 'p9', 'p10')
Ancestors$'p3' <- c('p4', 'p5', 'p9', 'p10')
Ancestors$'p4' <- c('p5', 'p9', 'p10')
Ancestors$'p5' <- c('p9', 'p10')
Ancestors$'p6' <- c('p4', 'p5', 'p9', 'p10')
Ancestors$'p7' <- c('p5', 'p9', 'p10')
Ancestors$'p8' <- c('p5', 'p9', 'p10')
Ancestors$'p9' <- NA
Ancestors$'p10' <- NA

Let's say that the query is

query <- c('p5', 'p4', 'p1')

Then the list I'd like to have produced is

# lst <- list()
# 
# lst$'p2'
#   'p1'
# lst$'p3'
#   'p1'
# lst$'p4'
#   'p1'
# lst$'p5'
#   'p1', 'p4'
# lst$'p8'
#   'p1'
# lst$'p9'
#   'p1', 'p4', 'p5'
# lst$'p10'
#   'p1', 'p4', 'p5'

(2,3,4,5,8,9,10) are all the ancestors that exist for the query terms. So that's the list I'd like to make. Then for each of those named items, I'd like to put down a list of the query terms that are descendents of the list item. I'm sorry for the confusing example. I hope it makes sense.

Here's what I tried so far

lst <- list()

lapply(query, function(x) {
  theAncestors <- Ancestors[[x]]
  sapply(theAncestors, function(y) {
    lst[[y]][[1]] <- c(lst[[y]][[1]], x)
  })
})

But this doesn't populate the list lst. All that happens is that it prints out

[[1]]
  p9  p10 
"p5" "p5" 

[[2]]
  p5   p9  p10 
"p4" "p4" "p4" 

[[3]]
  p2   p3   p4   p5   p8   p9  p10 
"p1" "p1" "p1" "p1" "p1" "p1" "p1" 

which is a little different from what I want. Also, when I try to output lst, it's still empty. So this code isn't even affecting lst. So how can I get my desired output? I thought of using a for loop, but I think those are very slow in R. My actual problem will probably have 100s or 1000s of query terms and many more ancestor terms. So lst will be very long. So I'm thinking a for loop probably won't work.

Edit: I figured it out. My code is now:

lst <- list()

aLst <- unlist(lapply(query, function(x) {
  theAncestors <- Ancestors[[x]]
  sapply(theAncestors, function(y) {
    lst[[y]][1] <- c(lst[[y]][[1]], x)
  })
}))
aLst <- split(unname(aLst), names(aLst))

This prints out

$p10
[1] "p5" "p4" "p1"

$p2
[1] "p1"

$p3
[1] "p1"

$p4
[1] "p1"

$p5
[1] "p4" "p1"

$p8
[1] "p1"

$p9
[1] "p5" "p4" "p1"

Which is what I wanted

2

The reason it's just printing is that your lapply isn't being assigned to anything. The reason it's not populating lst is slightly more complicated, and is to do with function scope - there's a very detailed explanation here: http://adv-r.had.co.nz/Environments.html#function-envs.

The gist is that lst is not being modified - a copy of it is being modified within the function, but it's being modified in an environment which is thrown away after the function finishes calling. There are a couple of ways round this - the first is to use <<- rather than <-. This 'deep assignment' operator looks deeper than <- and will modify things outside the function scope.

The second is I think to approach your problem a little differently - taking your Ancestors list and query you could first do:

query_members <- Ancestors[query]

query_members

# $`p4`
# [1] "p5"  "p9"  "p10"

# $p5
# [1] "p9"  "p10"

# $p1
# [1] "p2"  "p3"  "p4"  "p5"  "p8"  "p9"  "p10"

to subset to the elements you want. You now need to "invert" this in some sense. To begin with, get the unique ancestors of your query members:

query_ancestors <- sort(unique(unlist(query_members)))

query_ancestors

# [1] "p10" "p2"  "p3"  "p4"  "p5"  "p8"  "p9" 

Now you have something you can lapply, because it has the same structure as your desired output. You just need to answer the question "for each of these ancestors, which query member is a descendant?"

So you could write a little function like:

get_descendants <- function(query_ancestor, query_members) {

  sort(names(Filter(function(x) { query_ancestor %in% x }, query_members)))

}

# test it out
get_descendants("p5", query_members)

# [1] "p1" "p4"

Now we can lapply it and set the names using our query_ancestors:

lst <- lapply(query_ancestors, get_descendants, query_members = query_members)
names(lst) <- query_ancestors
lst

# $`p10`
# [1] "p1" "p4" "p5"

# $p2
# [1] "p1"

# $p3
# [1] "p1"

# $p4
# [1] "p1"

# $p5
# [1] "p1" "p4"

# $p8
# [1] "p1"

# $p9
# [1] "p1" "p4" "p5"

Putting it all together you could write a nice function which wraps all this up and lets you focus on the query and the Ancestors list:

list_ancestors <- function(query, Ancestors) {

  query_members <- Ancestors[query]
  query_ancestors <- sort(unique(unlist(query_members)))

  lst <- lapply(query_ancestors, function(element, members) {
    sort(names(Filter(function(x) element %in% x, members)))
  }, members = query_members)

  names(lst) <- query_ancestors

  lst

}

# so for example with just p7
list_ancestors("p7", Ancestors)

# $`p10`
# [1] "p7"

# $p5
# [1] "p7"

# $p9
# [1] "p7"

Hope this helps!

  • Thank you very much! I think your way is very intuitive, and I'll keep it in mind for when I come across a similar problem. But I managed to figure it out just before I saw your post. See my edit above. Thanks again! – Zuhaib Ahmed Jun 18 at 20:06
  • Hi there - no problem. If my answer was helpful and correct would you mind accepting it anyway? – cwthom Jun 18 at 20:11
  • Whoops. Your answer was helpful, I just completely forgot to accept it. Thanks – Zuhaib Ahmed Jun 18 at 20:57

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