11

The result is "a", but I want it to be "b". I want to know why, and how I can call doTest without arguments to print "b".

class AA {
    func doTest() {
        print("a")
    }
}

class BB: AA {
    func doTest(_ different: Bool = true) {
        print("b")
    }
}

let bObjc = BB()
bObjc.doTest()
  • 1
    What is your use case? When did you have an implementation like this? – Rakesha Shastri Jun 19 at 9:28
  • 1
    your case above is a compiler issue this func doTest(_ different: Bool = true) has a varient of func doTest() that the compiler should not even compile this code as the base class has a similar 1 – Sh_Khan Jun 19 at 9:42
11

Class BB does not override the method from AA, that means two methods exist on BB:

func doTest() // inherited
func doTest(_ different: Bool = true) // declared

When you call

bObjc.doTest()

the compiler has to choose one of them. And it prefers method without parameter over the method with a default parameter.

  • func doTest(_ different: Bool = true) is declared but has a variant func doTest() that is the thing you should clarify – Sh_Khan Jun 19 at 9:49
9

The reason you get an output of a is because you are not calling your new method func doTest(_ different: Bool = true) that expects a Bool.

bObjc.doTest(true)  // b

What you are actually doing is calling the method doTest() that is inherited from the parent class AA.


If you want to override the method in AA you need to do just that:

class BB: AA {
    override func doTest() {
        print("b")
    }
}

let bObjc = BB()
bObjc.doTest()
3

This is an unfortunate case. There's no way to influence how the compiler disambiguates the call with plain Swift like that.

Let's look at some options:

  1. Acknowledge what the compiler does and override BB.doTest() to forward the call to BB.doTest(_:)
  2. Use #selector(BB.doTest(_:)) to specify the desired method's signature
  3. Use Swift protocols to limit the possible methods the compiler is considering

Override similarly-named base method (probably the simplest solution)

The easiest way to force the compiler to not use the simplest method signature in this case is to override doTest in B and re-route the call:

class AA {
    func doTest() {
        print("a")
    }
}

class BB: AA {
    override func doTest() {
        self.doTest(true)
    }

    func doTest(_ different: Bool = true) {
        print("b")
    }
}

let bObjc = BB()
bObjc.doTest()

If that's not possible, read on.

Specify the doTest(_:) selector (ObjC)

You can specify if you want to call doTest() or doTest(_:) via selectors. You can only call methods by their selectors if you annotate the method as @objc and make the type inherit from NSObject, though. So this might be overkill in practice.

import Foundation

class AA: NSObject {
    @objc func doTest() {
        print("a")
    }
}

class BB: AA {
    @objc func doTest(_ different: Bool = true) {
        print("b")
    }
}

let bObjc = BB()
bObjc.performSelector(onMainThread: #selector(BB.doTest(_:)), with: nil, waitUntilDone: true)

Disambiguate using protocols

You can help the compiler pick the correct solution by splitting the type where doTest() and doTest(_:) are defined up further. Use a protocol and then cast the receiver of the doTest message to the protocol to let the compiler know it should use consider the method defined in the protocol.

Step 1: Extract the protocol

The protocol itself:

protocol DoTestSpecific {
    func doTest(_ different: Bool)
}

Unfortunately, you cannot specify default argument values in method definitions in protocols. Only the implementation may define default arguments.

Step 2: Use the protocol in the BB class

Casting (bObjc as DoTestSpecific) will tell the compiler to not consider AA.doTest at all. Since the protocol specifies no default parameter, though, you have to provide the value on the call site for now:

class AA {
    func doTest() {
        print("a")
    }
}

class BB: AA, DoTestSpecific {
    func doTest(_ different: Bool = true) {
        print("b")
    }
}

let bObjc = BB()
(bObjc as DoTestSpecific).doTest(false)

Step 3: Move implementation to protocol extension

The result of the cast (bObjc as DoTestSpecific) does not know about BB's implementation of the method and the default parameter value that goes with it.

But you can move the implementation to a protocol extension and thus make an implementation that doesn't require parameters known even for the result of the cast!

Final code:

class AA {
    func doTest() {
        print("a")
    }
}

protocol DoTestSpecific {
    func doTest(_ different: Bool)
}

extension DoTestSpecific {
    func doTest(_ different: Bool = true) {
        print("b")
    }
}

class BB: AA, DoTestSpecific {
}

let bObjc = BB()
(bObjc as DoTestSpecific).doTest()

This works as expected. It requires the addition of a protocol and an implementation in a protocol extension. But now there's no ambiguity on the call site anymore.

If the example code was more complex and included dependencies on object state or other objects, it probably would be way harder or even impossible to make this work.

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