3

I'm shocked that no one has asked this on SO before.. since it seems like a simple enough of a problem.

I have a single column in a pandas Dataframe that looks like this:

df = pd.DataFrame(data=[['APPLEGATE WINERY    455.292049'],['AMAND FARM  849.827192'],['COBB FARM ST    1039.49357'],['DIRIGIA 2048.947284']], columns = ['Col1'])

    Col1
0   APPLEGATE WINERY 455.292049
1   AMAND FARM 849.827192
2   COBB FARM ST 1039.49357
3   DIRIGIA 2048.947284

And I just want to separate the string characters from the numeric, so the result should look like this

Name                Area
APPLEGATE WINERY    455.292049
AMAND FARM          849.827192
COBB FARM ST        1039.49357
DIRIGIA             2048.947284

I know I can use Regular Expressions in python, but this seems like overkill since a) it's just a separation of data types and b) the strings have different lengths and the numerics have different numbers of digits.

So one result would start to look like this:

df['Name'] = df.Col1.str.extract('([A-Z]\w{0,})', expand=True)
df['Area'] = df.Col1.str.extract('(\d)', expand=True)

But is there a nice, clean solution out there to solve this problem without going through the hassle of using RegEx and instead separating strings from numerics into two columns?

  • Could you possibly have a 32nd Street? – user3483203 Jun 19 at 17:12
  • No all of the names start with an alphabet letter not numeric. – JAG2024 Jun 19 at 17:16
6

Use a single extract call. You'll also want to strip trailing whitespaces from the result if you use this regex.

df2 = (df['Col1'].str.extract(r'(?P<Name>.*?)(?P<Area>\d+(?:\.\d+)?)')
                 .applymap(str.strip))
df2
               Name         Area
0  APPLEGATE WINERY   455.292049
1        AMAND FARM   849.827192
2      COBB FARM ST   1039.49357
3           DIRIGIA  2048.947284

Regex Breakdown

(?P<Name>   # first named capture group - "Name"
    .*?     # match anything (non-greedy)
)
(?P<Area>   # second named group - "Area"
    \d+     # match one or more digits,
    (?:     
       \.   # decimal
       \d+  # trailing digits
    )?      # the `?` indicates floating point is optional
)

PS, to convert the "Area" column to numeric, use pd.to_numeric.

  • 1
    I really appreciate the explanation of the RegEx! Thanks much. To get this solution to work I also had to convert the Dataframe to string .astype(str) because I previously got the error Can only use .str accessor with string values, which use np.object_ dtype in pandas but now it works. – JAG2024 Jun 19 at 17:14
  • 1
    @JAG2024 You're welcome. The idea behind the regex is to find what looks like a floating point number and capture that as the second group "Area", then capture everything before it as "Name". Glad it was helpful. – cs95 Jun 19 at 17:16
2

Feel like you can just do str.rsplit

df.Col1.str.rsplit(' ',1,expand=True).apply(lambda x : x.str.strip(),1)
Out[314]: 
                  0            1
0  APPLEGATE WINERY   455.292049
1        AMAND FARM   849.827192
2      COBB FARM ST   1039.49357
3           DIRIGIA  2048.947284
  • This is a good solution assuming there are not trailing spaces in the column. Try df.Col1.str.strip().str.rsplit(...) Nice one! – cs95 Jun 19 at 17:10
  • @cs95 ah , thank you :-) – WeNYoBen Jun 19 at 17:10
  • Thanks for this: cool to see how I can use lambda. – JAG2024 Jun 19 at 17:15
1

You can use rsplit. It will split the string starting from the right.

pd.DataFrame(df.Col1.str.rsplit(' ',1).tolist(), columns = ['Name','Area'])

Result:
    Name                Area
0   APPLEGATE WINERY    455.292049
1   AMAND FARM          849.827192
2   COBB FARM ST       1039.49357
3   DIRIGIA            2048.947284
  • Hadn't heard of rsplit so thanks! – JAG2024 Jun 19 at 17:15
0

Try this regex:

df.Col1.str.extract('(.*\S)\s+([\d\.]+)')

Output:

                  0            1
0  APPLEGATE WINERY   455.292049
1        AMAND FARM   849.827192
2      COBB FARM ST   1039.49357
3           DIRIGIA  2048.947284
  • 1
    Realized that and just fixed. – Quang Hoang Jun 19 at 17:06
  • Thanks, upvoted :) – cs95 Jun 19 at 17:06

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