224

In Javascript, I'm trying to take an initial array of number values and count the elements inside it. Ideally, the result would be two new arrays, the first specifying each unique element, and the second containing the number of times each element occurs. However, I'm open to suggestions on the format of the output.

For example, if the initial array was:

5, 5, 5, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 9, 4

Then two new arrays would be created. The first would contain the name of each unique element:

5, 2, 9, 4

The second would contain the number of times that element occurred in the initial array:

3, 5, 1, 1

Because the number 5 occurs three times in the initial array, the number 2 occurs five times and 9 and 4 both appear once.

I've searched a lot for a solution, but nothing seems to work, and everything I've tried myself has wound up being ridiculously complex. Any help would be appreciated!

Thanks :)

| |
  • 8
    If all you needed was to see if a value appears only once (instead of two or more times), you could use if (arr.indexOf(value) == arr.lastIndexOf(value)) – Rodrigo Mar 6 '16 at 12:58
  • 1
    We can use ramda.js to achieve this the easy way. const ary = [5, 5, 5, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 9, 4]; R.countBy(r=> r)(ary) – Eshwar Prasad Yaddanapudi Jan 4 '17 at 5:50
  • arr.filter(x => x===5).length would return 3 to indicate that there are '3' fives in the array. – noobninja Jun 15 at 21:21

36 Answers 36

96

Here you go:

function foo(arr) {
    var a = [], b = [], prev;

    arr.sort();
    for ( var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++ ) {
        if ( arr[i] !== prev ) {
            a.push(arr[i]);
            b.push(1);
        } else {
            b[b.length-1]++;
        }
        prev = arr[i];
    }

    return [a, b];
}

Live demo: http://jsfiddle.net/simevidas/bnACW/

Note

This changes the order of the original input array using Array.sort

| |
  • 25
    has side-effect of sorting the array (side effects are bad), also sorting is O(N log(N)) and the elegance gain isn't worth it – ninjagecko May 25 '11 at 17:05
  • 1
    @ninja Which other answer do you prefer? – Šime Vidas May 25 '11 at 18:40
  • In absence of a nice high-level primitive from a third-party library, I would normally implement this like the reduce answer. I was about to submit such an answer before I saw it already existed. Nevertheless the counts[num] = counts[num] ? counts[num]+1 : 1 answer also works (equivalent to the if(!result[a[i]])result[a[i]]=0 answer, which is more elegant but less easy to read); this answers can be modified to use a "nicer" version of the for loop, perhaps a third-party for-loop, but I sort of ignored that since the standard index-based for-loops are sadly the default. – ninjagecko May 25 '11 at 18:51
  • 2
    @ninja I agree. Those answers are better. Unfortunately I cannot un-accept my own answer. – Šime Vidas May 25 '11 at 20:59
  • For small arrays sorting it in-place can be faster than creating an associative array. – quant_dev Sep 29 '17 at 20:24
224

You can use an object to hold the results:

var arr = [5, 5, 5, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 9, 4];
var counts = {};

for (var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
  var num = arr[i];
  counts[num] = counts[num] ? counts[num] + 1 : 1;
}

console.log(counts[5], counts[2], counts[9], counts[4]);

So, now your counts object can tell you what the count is for a particular number:

console.log(counts[5]); // logs '3'

If you want to get an array of members, just use the keys() functions

keys(counts); // returns ["5", "2", "9", "4"]
| |
  • 3
    It should be pointed out, that Object.keys() function is only supported in IE9+, FF4+, SF5+, CH6+ but Opera doesn't support it. I think the biggest show stopper here is IE9+. – Robert Koritnik Jul 28 '11 at 14:45
  • 19
    Similarly, I also like counts[num] = (counts[num] || 0) + 1. That way you only have to write counts[num] twice instead of three times on that one line there. – robru Jul 21 '14 at 1:18
  • 1
    This is a nice answer. This is easily abstracted into a function that accepts an array and returns a 'counts' object. – bitsand Feb 23 '17 at 0:08
  • This is true for the specific example in the question, but for the sake of googlers it's worth pointing out that this is not always a safe technique for wider usage. Storing the values as object keys to count them means you're casting those values to strings and then counting that value. [5, "5"] will simply say you've got "5" two times. Or counting instances some different objects is just gonna tell you there's a lot of [object Object]. Etc. etc. – Jimbo Jonny Feb 5 at 9:51
  • How could I then filter the returned object to show me highest to lowest, or lowest to highest count on a numbers – Ryan Holton Feb 11 at 22:00
94
var a = [5, 5, 5, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 9, 4].reduce(function (acc, curr) {
  if (typeof acc[curr] == 'undefined') {
    acc[curr] = 1;
  } else {
    acc[curr] += 1;
  }

  return acc;
}, {});

// a == {2: 5, 4: 1, 5: 3, 9: 1}
| |
  • 40
    acc[curr] ? acc[curr]++ : acc[curr] = 1; – pmandell Nov 9 '15 at 19:48
  • Thanks, very nice solution ;) ... and to get the "key" and "value" arrays: const keys = Object.keys(a); const values = Object.values(a); – ncenerar Jun 7 at 8:15
82

If using underscore or lodash, this is the simplest thing to do:

_.countBy(array);

Such that:

_.countBy([5, 5, 5, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 9, 4])
=> Object {2: 5, 4: 1, 5: 3, 9: 1}

As pointed out by others, you can then execute the _.keys() and _.values() functions on the result to get just the unique numbers, and their occurrences, respectively. But in my experience, the original object is much easier to deal with.

| |
55

Don't use two arrays for the result, use an object:

a      = [5, 5, 5, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 9, 4];
result = { };
for(var i = 0; i < a.length; ++i) {
    if(!result[a[i]])
        result[a[i]] = 0;
    ++result[a[i]];
}

Then result will look like:

{
    2: 5,
    4: 1,
    5: 3,
    9: 1
}
| |
48

How about an ECMAScript2015 option.

const a = [5, 5, 5, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 9, 4];

const aCount = new Map([...new Set(a)].map(
    x => [x, a.filter(y => y === x).length]
));
aCount.get(5)  // 3
aCount.get(2)  // 5
aCount.get(9)  // 1
aCount.get(4)  // 1

This example passes the input array to the Set constructor creating a collection of unique values. The spread syntax then expands these values into a new array so we can call map and translate this into a two-dimensional array of [value, count] pairs - i.e. the following structure:

Array [
   [5, 3],
   [2, 5],
   [9, 1],
   [4, 1]
]

The new array is then passed to the Map constructor resulting in an iterable object:

Map {
    5 => 3,
    2 => 5,
    9 => 1,
    4 => 1
}

The great thing about a Map object is that it preserves data-types - that is to say aCount.get(5) will return 3 but aCount.get("5") will return undefined. It also allows for any value / type to act as a key meaning this solution will also work with an array of objects.

function frequencies(/* {Array} */ a){
    return new Map([...new Set(a)].map(
        x => [x, a.filter(y => y === x).length]
    ));
}

let foo = { value: 'foo' },
    bar = { value: 'bar' },
    baz = { value: 'baz' };

let aNumbers = [5, 5, 5, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 9, 4],
    aObjects = [foo, bar, foo, foo, baz, bar];

frequencies(aNumbers).forEach((val, key) => console.log(key + ': ' + val));
frequencies(aObjects).forEach((val, key) => console.log(key.value + ': ' + val));

| |
  • do you have by any chance an improved answer of this just for an object array? im having trouble trying to modify it for an object array, where you just create a new array/map/set in which you remove duplicates, and add a new value for the object, let say called "duplicatedCount: value". i managed to remove duplicates in my nested objects array from this answer stackoverflow.com/a/36744732 – sharon gur Apr 4 '17 at 14:32
  • Set uses object references for uniqueness and offers no API for comparison of "similar" objects. If you want to use this approach for such a task you'd need some intermediate reduction function that guarantees an array of unique instances. It's not the most efficient but I put together a quick example here. – Emissary Apr 6 '17 at 9:25
  • Thanks for the answer! but i actually solved it a lilttle bit differently. if you can see the answer i added here stackoverflow.com/a/43211561/4474900 i gave example of what i did. it works well, my case had a complex object needed comparing. dont know about the efficiency of my solution though – sharon gur Apr 6 '17 at 15:26
  • 9
    This might use nice new data structures but has runtime in O() while there are plenty of simple algorithms here that solve it in O(n). – raphinesse Jan 30 '18 at 20:16
43

I think this is the simplest way how to count occurrences with same value in array.

var a = [true, false, false, false];
a.filter(function(value){
    return value === false;
}).length
| |
  • 9
    or a.filter(value => !value).length with the new js syntax – t3chb0t Jun 1 '18 at 8:03
  • Doesn’t answer the question. – Ry- Mar 19 at 2:44
39

One line ES6 solution. So many answers using object as a map but I can't see anyone using an actual Map

const map = arr.reduce((acc, e) => acc.set(e, (acc.get(e) || 0) + 1), new Map());

Use map.keys() to get unique elements

Use map.values() to get the occurrences

Use map.entries() to get the pairs [element, frequency]

var arr = [5, 5, 5, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 9, 4]

const map = arr.reduce((acc, e) => acc.set(e, (acc.get(e) || 0) + 1), new Map());

console.info([...map.keys()])
console.info([...map.values()])
console.info([...map.entries()])

| |
  • Modern Javascript gets the best from all worlds – Igniter Nov 30 '19 at 18:35
32

const data = [5, 5, 5, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 9, 4]

function count(arr) {
  return arr.reduce((prev, curr) => (prev[curr] = ++prev[curr] || 1, prev), {})
}

console.log(count(data))

| |
  • 4
    Would anyone care to explain this (prev[curr] = ++prev[curr] || 1, prev) ? – Souljacker May 14 '17 at 9:34
  • 6
    The comma operator “evaluates each of its operands (from left to right) and returns the value of the last operand”, so this increments the value of prev[curr] (or initialises it to 1), then returns prev. – ChrisV Jun 25 '17 at 16:37
  • but is the output an array? – Francesco Oct 8 '17 at 23:47
21

If you favour a single liner.

arr.reduce(function(countMap, word) {countMap[word] = ++countMap[word] || 1;return countMap}, {});

Edit (6/12/2015): The Explanation from the inside out. countMap is a map that maps a word with its frequency, which we can see the anonymous function. What reduce does is apply the function with arguments as all the array elements and countMap being passed as the return value of the last function call. The last parameter ({}) is the default value of countMap for the first function call.

| |
  • 1
    You should explain this. that would make it a much better answer so people can learn how to use it in other use cases. – Andrew Grothe Apr 25 '15 at 23:38
  • A single liner that just removes the linebreak that would usually follow ;, { and }. ... OK. I think with that definition of a one liner we can write Conway's Game of Life as a "oneliner". – trincot Nov 30 '18 at 21:42
16

ES6 version should be much simplifier (another one line solution)

let arr = [5, 5, 5, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 9, 4];
let acc = arr.reduce((acc, val) => acc.set(val, 1 + (acc.get(val) || 0)), new Map());

console.log(acc);
// output: Map { 5 => 3, 2 => 5, 9 => 1, 4 => 1 }

A Map instead of plain Object helping us to distinguish different type of elements, or else all counting are base on strings

| |
9

Based on answer of @adamse and @pmandell (which I upvote), in ES6 you can do it in one line:

  • 2017 edit: I use || to reduce code size and make it more readable.

var a=[7,1,7,2,2,7,3,3,3,7,,7,7,7];
alert(JSON.stringify(

a.reduce((r,k)=>{r[k]=1+r[k]||1;return r},{})

));


It can be used to count characters:

var s="ABRACADABRA";
alert(JSON.stringify(

s.split('').reduce((a, c)=>{a[c]++?0:a[c]=1;return a},{})

));

| |
  • It would be more readable if you used || 0: (r,k)=>{r[k]=(r[k]||0)+1;return r} – 12Me21 May 10 '18 at 17:29
  • You can do anything in one line in JavaScript. – Ry- Apr 15 '19 at 7:28
  • And why is it a bad thing, @Ry-? – ESL Apr 15 '19 at 13:49
  • Sometimes it's more clear in several lines, other is clearer in one line. Althoug it's a matter of "taste". – ESL Apr 15 '19 at 13:50
  • I mean “in ES6 you can do it in one line” applies to every answer, and you could also do this in ES5 in one line. – Ry- Apr 15 '19 at 18:01
8

If you are using underscore you can go the functional route

a = ['foo', 'foo', 'bar'];

var results = _.reduce(a,function(counts,key){ counts[key]++; return counts },
                  _.object( _.map( _.uniq(a), function(key) { return [key, 0] })))

so your first array is

_.keys(results)

and the second array is

_.values(results)

most of this will default to native javascript functions if they are available

demo : http://jsfiddle.net/dAaUU/

| |
5

Here's just something light and easy for the eyes...

function count(a,i){
 var result = 0;
 for(var o in a)
  if(a[o] == i)
   result++;
 return result;
}

Edit: And since you want all the occurences...

function count(a){
 var result = {};
 for(var i in a){
  if(result[a[i]] == undefined) result[a[i]] = 0;
  result[a[i]]++;
 }
 return result;
}
| |
  • 1
    The question asked for counts of all elements. – Ry- Jul 9 '17 at 15:00
  • Ok, missed that. Should be fixed now. – ElDoRado1239 Jul 10 '17 at 19:38
5

ES6 solution with reduce (fixed):

const arr = [2, 2, 2, 3, 2]

const count = arr.reduce((pre, cur) => (cur === 2) ? ++pre : pre, 0)
console.log(count) // 4

| |
  • Not sure how one number represents the counts of each distinct array element like the question asked. – Ry- Apr 15 '19 at 7:29
5

So here's how I'd do it with some of the newest javascript features:

First, reduce the array to a Map of the counts:

let countMap = array.reduce(
  (map, value) => {map.set(value, (map.get(value) || 0) + 1); return map}, 
  new Map()
)

By using a Map, your starting array can contain any type of object, and the counts will be correct. Without a Map, some types of objects will give you strange counts. See the Map docs for more info on the differences.

This could also be done with an object if all your values are symbols, numbers, or strings:

let countObject = array.reduce(
  (map, value) => { map[value] = (map[value] || 0) + 1; return map },
  {}
)

Or slightly fancier in a functional way without mutation, using destructuring and object spread syntax:

let countObject = array.reduce(
  (value, {[value]: count = 0, ...rest}) => ({ [value]: count + 1, ...rest }),
  {}
)

At this point, you can use the Map or object for your counts (and the map is directly iterable, unlike an object), or convert it to two arrays.

For the Map:

countMap.forEach((count, value) => console.log(`value: ${value}, count: ${count}`)

let values = countMap.keys()
let counts = countMap.values()

Or for the object:

Object
  .entries(countObject) // convert to array of [key, valueAtKey] pairs
  .forEach(([value, count]) => console.log(`value: ${value}, count: ${count}`)

let values = Object.keys(countObject)
let counts = Object.values(countObject)
| |
5

Edit 2020: this is a pretty old answer (nine years). Extending the native prototype will always generate discussion. Although I think the programmer is free to choose her own programming style, here's a (more modern) approach to the problem without extending Array.prototype:

{
  // create array with some pseudo random values (1 - 5)
  const arr = Array.from({length: 100})
    .map( () => Math.floor(1 + Math.random() * 5) );
  // frequencies using a reducer
  const arrFrequencies = arr.reduce((acc, value) => 
      ({ ...acc, [value]: acc[value] + 1 || 1}), {} )
  console.log(`Value 4 occurs ${arrFrequencies[4]} times in arrFrequencies`);

  // bonus: restore Array from frequencies
  const arrRestored = Object.entries(arrFrequencies)
    .reduce( (acc, [key, value]) => acc.concat(Array(value).fill(+key)), [] );
  console.log(arrRestored.join());  
}
.as-console-wrapper { top: 0; max-height: 100% !important; }

The old (2011) answer: you could extend Array.prototype, like this:

{
  Array.prototype.frequencies = function() {
    var l = this.length,
      result = {
        all: []
      };
    while (l--) {
      result[this[l]] = result[this[l]] ? ++result[this[l]] : 1;
    }
    // all pairs (label, frequencies) to an array of arrays(2)
    for (var l in result) {
      if (result.hasOwnProperty(l) && l !== 'all') {
        result.all.push([l, result[l]]);
      }
    }
    return result;
  };

  var freqs = [5, 5, 5, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 9, 4].frequencies();
  console.log(`freqs[2]: ${freqs[2]}`); //=> 5
  
  // or
  var freqs = '1,1,2,one,one,2,2,22,three,four,five,three,three,five'
    .split(',')
    .frequencies();
    
  console.log(`freqs.three: ${freqs.three}`); //=> 3
  
// Alternatively you can utilize Array.map:

    Array.prototype.frequencies = function() {
      var freqs = {
        sum: 0
      };
      this.map(function(a) {
        if (!(a in this)) {
          this[a] = 1;
        } else {
          this[a] += 1;
        }
        this.sum += 1;
        return a;
      }, freqs);
      return freqs;
    }
}
.as-console-wrapper { top: 0; max-height: 100% !important; }

| |
4
var array = [5, 5, 5, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 9, 4];

function countDuplicates(obj, num){
  obj[num] = (++obj[num] || 1);
  return obj;
}

var answer = array.reduce(countDuplicates, {});
// answer => {2:5, 4:1, 5:3, 9:1};

If you still want two arrays, then you could use answer like this...

var uniqueNums = Object.keys(answer);
// uniqueNums => ["2", "4", "5", "9"];

var countOfNums = Object.keys(answer).map(key => answer[key]);
// countOfNums => [5, 1, 3, 1];

Or if you want uniqueNums to be numbers

var uniqueNums = Object.keys(answer).map(key => +key);
// uniqueNums => [2, 4, 5, 9];
| |
  • 1
    es6/7 makes this all much nicer. You may also want to reduce to a Map instead, since it will avoid the typecasting that using a number as an object key (casting as string) does. const answer = array.reduce((a, e) => a.set(e, (a.get(e) || 0) + 1), new Map()) .You can get answer.keys() for the keys, and answer.values() for the values as arrays. [...answer] will give you a big array with all the key/values as 2d arrays. – Josh from Qaribou Jul 9 '17 at 13:08
3

Solution using a map with O(n) time complexity.

var arr = [2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 4, 5, 5, 5, 9];

const countOccurrences = (arr) => {
    const map = {};
    for ( var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++ ) {
        map[arr[i]] = ~~map[arr[i]] + 1;
    }
    return map;
}

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/simevidas/bnACW/

| |
  • My upvote to you, this works like butter with O(n) time complexity – Vishal Shetty May 7 at 10:46
2

My solution with ramda:

const testArray = [5, 5, 5, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 9, 4]

const counfFrequency = R.compose(
  R.map(R.length),
  R.groupBy(R.identity),
)

counfFrequency(testArray)

Link to REPL.

| |
2

Using MAP you can have 2 arrays in the output: One containing the occurrences & the other one is containing the number of occurrences.

const dataset = [2,2,4,2,6,4,7,8,5,6,7,10,10,10,15];
let values = [];
let keys = [];

var mapWithOccurences = dataset.reduce((a,c) => {
  if(a.has(c)) a.set(c,a.get(c)+1);
  else a.set(c,1);
  return a;
}, new Map())
.forEach((value, key, map) => {
  keys.push(key);
  values.push(value);
});


console.log(keys)
console.log(values)

| |
1

There is a much better and easy way that we can do this using ramda.js. Code sample here

const ary = [5, 5, 5, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 9, 4]; R.countBy(r=> r)(ary) countBy documentation is at documentation

| |
1

Using Lodash

const values = [5, 5, 5, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 9, 4];
const frequency = _.map(_.groupBy(values), val => ({ value: val[0], frequency: val.length }));
console.log(frequency);
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/lodash.js/4.17.15/lodash.min.js"></script>

| |
1

I know this question is old but I realized there are too few solutions where you get the count array as asked with a minimal code so here is mine

// The initial array we want to count occurences
var initial = [5, 5, 5, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 9, 4];  

// The count array asked for
var count = Array.from(new Set(initial)).map(val => initial.filter(v => v === val).length);  

// Outputs [ 3, 5, 1, 1 ]

Beside you can get the set from that initial array with

var set = Array.from(new Set(initial));  

//set = [5, 2, 9, 4]  
| |
0

Check out the code below.

<html>
<head>
<script>
// array with values
var ar = [5, 5, 5, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 9, 4];

var Unique = []; // we'll store a list of unique values in here
var Counts = []; // we'll store the number of occurances in here

for(var i in ar)
{
    var Index = ar[i];
    Unique[Index] = ar[i];
    if(typeof(Counts[Index])=='undefined')  
        Counts[Index]=1;
    else
        Counts[Index]++;
}

// remove empty items
Unique = Unique.filter(function(){ return true});
Counts = Counts.filter(function(){ return true});

alert(ar.join(','));
alert(Unique.join(','));
alert(Counts.join(','));

var a=[];

for(var i=0; i<Unique.length; i++)
{
    a.push(Unique[i] + ':' + Counts[i] + 'x');
}
alert(a.join(', '));

</script>
</head>
<body>

</body>
</html>
| |
0

Try this:

Array.prototype.getItemCount = function(item) {
    var counts = {};
    for(var i = 0; i< this.length; i++) {
        var num = this[i];
        counts[num] = counts[num] ? counts[num]+1 : 1;
    }
    return counts[item] || 0;
}
| |
0

I was solving a similar problem on codewars and devised the following solution which worked for me.

This gives the highest count of an integer in an array and also the integer itself. I think it can be applied to string array as well.

To properly sort Strings, remove the function(a, b){return a-b} from inside the sort() portion

function mostFrequentItemCount(collection) {
    collection.sort(function(a, b){return a-b});
    var i=0;
    var ans=[];
    var int_ans=[];
    while(i<collection.length)
    {
        if(collection[i]===collection[i+1])
        {
            int_ans.push(collection[i]);
        }
        else
        {
            int_ans.push(collection[i]);
            ans.push(int_ans);
            int_ans=[];
        }
        i++;
    }

    var high_count=0;
    var high_ans;

    i=0;
    while(i<ans.length)
    {
        if(ans[i].length>high_count)
        {
            high_count=ans[i].length;
            high_ans=ans[i][0];
        }
        i++;
    }
    return high_ans;
}
| |
0

Here is a way to count occurrences inside an array of objects. It also places the first array's contents inside a new array to sort the values so that the order in the original array is not disrupted. Then a recursive function is used to go through each element and count the quantity property of each object inside the array.

var big_array = [
  { name: "Pineapples", quantity: 3 },
  { name: "Pineapples", quantity: 1 },
  { name: "Bananas", quantity: 1 },
  { name: "Limes", quantity: 1 },
  { name: "Bananas", quantity: 1 },
  { name: "Pineapples", quantity: 2 },
  { name: "Pineapples", quantity: 1 },
  { name: "Bananas", quantity: 1 },
  { name: "Bananas", quantity: 1 },
  { name: "Bananas", quantity: 5 },
  { name: "Coconuts", quantity: 1 },
  { name: "Lemons", quantity: 2 },
  { name: "Oranges", quantity: 1 },
  { name: "Lemons", quantity: 1 },
  { name: "Limes", quantity: 1 },
  { name: "Grapefruit", quantity: 1 },
  { name: "Coconuts", quantity: 5 },
  { name: "Oranges", quantity: 6 }
];

function countThem() {
  var names_array = [];
  for (var i = 0; i < big_array.length; i++) {
    names_array.push( Object.assign({}, big_array[i]) );
  }

  function outerHolder(item_array) {
    if (item_array.length > 0) {
      var occurrences = [];
      var counter = 0;
      var bgarlen = item_array.length;
      item_array.sort(function(a, b) { return (a.name > b.name) ? 1 : ((b.name > a.name) ? -1 : 0); });

      function recursiveCounter() {
        occurrences.push(item_array[0]);
        item_array.splice(0, 1);
        var last_occurrence_element = occurrences.length - 1;
        var last_occurrence_entry = occurrences[last_occurrence_element].name;
        var occur_counter = 0;
        var quantity_counter = 0;
        for (var i = 0; i < occurrences.length; i++) {
          if (occurrences[i].name === last_occurrence_entry) {
            occur_counter = occur_counter + 1;
            if (occur_counter === 1) {
              quantity_counter = occurrences[i].quantity;
            } else {
              quantity_counter = quantity_counter + occurrences[i].quantity;
            }
          }
        }

        if (occur_counter > 1) {
          var current_match = occurrences.length - 2;
          occurrences[current_match].quantity = quantity_counter;
          occurrences.splice(last_occurrence_element, 1);
        }

        counter = counter + 1;

        if (counter < bgarlen) {
          recursiveCounter();
        }
      }

      recursiveCounter();

      return occurrences;
    }
  }
  alert(JSON.stringify(outerHolder(names_array)));
}
| |
0
function countOcurrences(arr){
    return arr.reduce((aggregator, value, index, array) => {
      if(!aggregator[value]){
        return aggregator = {...aggregator, [value]: 1};  
      }else{
        return aggregator = {...aggregator, [value]:++aggregator[value]};
      }
    }, {})
}
| |
  • Extremely wasteful to copy the object every time. Creates a quadratic worst case when it could be linear. – Ry- Apr 15 '19 at 7:33
0

You can simplify this a bit by extending your arrays with a count function. It works similar to Ruby’s Array#count, if you’re familiar with it.

Array.prototype.count = function(obj){
  var count = this.length;
  if(typeof(obj) !== "undefined"){
    var array = this.slice(0), count = 0; // clone array and reset count
    for(i = 0; i < array.length; i++){
      if(array[i] == obj){ count++ }
    }
  }
  return count;
}

Usage:

let array = ['a', 'b', 'd', 'a', 'c'];
array.count('a'); // => 2
array.count('b'); // => 1
array.count('e'); // => 0
array.count(); // => 5

Gist


Edit

You can then get your first array, with each occurred item, using Array#filter:

let occurred = [];
array.filter(function(item) {
  if (!occurred.includes(item)) {
    occurred.push(item);
    return true;
  }
}); // => ["a", "b", "d", "c"]

And your second array, with the number of occurrences, using Array#count into Array#map:

occurred.map(array.count.bind(array)); // => [2, 1, 1, 1]

Alternatively, if order is irrelevant, you can just return it as a key-value pair:

let occurrences = {}
occurred.forEach(function(item) { occurrences[item] = array.count(item) });
occurences; // => {2: 5, 4: 1, 5: 3, 9: 1}
| |

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.