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I have a sorted array of real numbers in my Ruby program. I want to remove all the elements which are very "similar": their difference is smaller then a given limit. So finally I want to keep only those elements, which are well distinguishable from the others, the distinct elements: there are no other elements in the original array which are closer to them than the limit.

Currently I am experimenting with this two approach:

limit=0.5
vvs=vv.sort.reverse.each_cons(2).map{|a,b| (a-b).abs<limit ? nil : a}.compact

and

vvs=vv.each_cons(3).map{|a,b,c| (a-b).abs<limit && (b-c).abs<limit  ? nil : b}.compact

I need this method for my program which try to synchronize subtitles, and the values may contain some noise. Due to this fact I want to analyze only those distinct elements, which can be distinguished even when some additive noise is present.

My original real data from "Catch 22" https://pastebin.com/mRiS02mb

  • Wouldn't it make more sense to round the noisy values? – Stefan Jun 20 at 16:32
  • I think not, I need the original values, without rounding. However one can reduce the array by rounding/ceiling/flooring, and uniq-ing: vv.uniq{|z| (8*z).ceil} But the value of limit/delta isn't clear for me in this case. – Konstantin Jun 20 at 16:43
  • Your second sentence can be interpreted differently depending on whether one assumes elements are to be removed sequentially or simultaneously. The following sentence seems clear enough, but I don't find defining the term "distinct elements" helpful. I suggest you state your problem in only one way... – Cary Swoveland Jun 27 at 20:11
  • 1
    ...For example (assuming I interpreted it correctly): "Given a sorted array of floats, arr, and a non-negative float limit, I wish to return an array containing those elements n of arr for which the absolute difference between n and its immediate neighbours (or neighbour if n is the first or last element of the array) is no greater than limit". – Cary Swoveland Jun 27 at 20:11
1

There seems to be some ambiguity in the question. I interpret it as I stated in a comment on the question.

data = [ 3.42,  5.49,  6.12,  6.48,  7.11,  8.79,  9.36,
         9.54, 10.86, 10.95, 11.07, 13.08, 14.41, 14.92] 
limit = 0.5

([-Float::INFINITY].concat(data) << Float::INFINITY).each_cons(3).
  select { |a,b,c| b-a >= 0.5 && c-b >= 0.5 }.
  map { |_,b,_| b }
  #=> [3.42, 5.49, 7.11, 8.79, 14.41, 14.92]
2

Did not checked real data, but maybe something like (started form 0, but can change to -Float::INFINITY):

data = [1, 1.05, 1.5, 1.5, 1.9, 2, 2.1, 3, 3.6, 4, 4.1]

delta = 0.5
data.each_with_object([]) { |e, o| o << e if e >= (o.last || 0) + delta }

#=> [1, 1.5, 2, 3, 3.6, 4.1]
  • The OP wishes to keep only "...the distinct elements: there are no other elements in the original array which are closer to them than the limit." If data = [0.2, 0.5] and delta = 0.5 your return value is [0.5]. Should it not be an empty array? – Cary Swoveland Jun 27 at 19:29
  • @CarySwoveland, it was unclear, so I considered to at least have one element (the first). If data = [0.2, 0.5] and delta = 0.5 it returns [0.2]. Your solution should be correct since accepted. But check: it is returning [] for the here mentioned example; in the example of your answer it jumps from 8.79 to 14.41. – iGian Jul 2 at 14:06
1

Given this example data:

data = [
  1.07, 1.14, 1.14, 1.24, 1.55, 1.56, 1.82, 1.83, 2.04, 2.16, 2.23,
  2.37, 2.38, 2.39, 2.41, 2.46, 2.54, 2.58, 2.93, 2.94, 2.98, 3.06,
  3.12, 3.18, 3.62, 3.65, 3.69, 3.87, 4.0, 4.25, 4.36, 4.36, 4.38,
  4.63, 4.78, 4.8, 4.83, 4.86, 5.13, 5.37
]

You could group the numbers by their rounded value:

limit = 0.5
grouped_data = data.group_by { |f| (f / limit).round * limit }
#=> {
#     1.0 => [1.07, 1.14, 1.14, 1.24],
#     1.5 => [1.55, 1.56],
#     2.0 => [1.82, 1.83, 2.04, 2.16, 2.23],
#     2.5 => [2.37, 2.38, 2.39, 2.41, 2.46, 2.54, 2.58],
#     3.0 => [2.93, 2.94, 2.98, 3.06, 3.12, 3.18],
#     3.5 => [3.62, 3.65, 3.69],
#     4.0 => [3.87, 4.0],
#     4.5 => [4.25, 4.36, 4.36, 4.38, 4.63],
#     5.0 => [4.78, 4.8, 4.83, 4.86, 5.13],
#     5.5 => [5.37]
#   }

Values from 0.75 to 1.25 are in the 1.0 slot, values from 1.25 to 1.75 in the 1.5 slot and so on.

Now pick a value from group, e.g. the first one:

grouped_data.map { |k, vs| vs.first }
#=> [1.07, 1.55, 1.82, 2.37, 2.93, 3.62, 3.87, 4.25, 4.78, 5.37]

or the middle one:

grouped_data.map { |k, vs| vs[vs.size/2] }
#=> [1.14, 1.56, 2.04, 2.41, 3.06, 3.65, 4.0, 4.36, 4.83, 5.37]

or the value closest to its respective slot value:

grouped_data.map { |k, vs| vs.min_by { |v| (k - v).abs } }
#=> [1.07, 1.55, 2.04, 2.46, 2.98, 3.62, 4.0, 4.38, 5.13, 5.37]

Note that values from adjacent slots could still be within the limit if they happen to be close to the boundaries, e.g.

[1.24, 1.26].group_by { |f| (f / limit).round * limit }
#=> { 1.0 => [1.24], 1.5 => [1.26] }
  • Should I omit every second group, to ensure the given limit? – Konstantin Jun 21 at 13:57
  • @Konstantin your description seemed a bit vague (I want to remove all the elements which are very "similar") so I just wanted to give an alternative approach. Define what you actually want, then implement it. – Stefan Jun 21 at 14:45
  • In fact I want to omit those elements which can be easily mistaken in the co-domain due to the additive errors in the original domain, as I map two sets, for finding as much matching subtitle lines as possible. – Konstantin Jun 21 at 15:37
  • Not sure what you mean by “additive errors” and “matching subtitle lines”. – Stefan Jun 21 at 16:20
  • For example X is for a timing data of one subtitle file, then Y = a*X+b+eps is the other subtitle file timing data, where "a" and "b" should be calculated, and eps is some additive "noise", random values for example in the (-1/8,+1/8) interval. To solve this, one can examine the X(n+1)-X(n)=dX differences for all pairs and mapping them to the appropriate Y(n+1)-Y(n)=dY differences. If the mapping is successful, then the value of "a" can be calculated as sum(dX) / sum(dY). After that "b" can be calculated easily as well. – Konstantin Jun 21 at 17:24

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