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I have a text file which contains how many times a specific page has been visited by an IP, example:

/help_page/1 126.318.035.038
/contact 184.123.665.067
/home 184.123.665.067
/about/2 444.701.448.104
/help_page/1 929.398.951.889
/index 444.701.448.104
/help_page/1 722.247.931.582
/about 061.945.150.735
/help_page/1 646.865.545.408
/home 235.313.352.950

Now I need to print a list by parsing the log file with most page views ordered from most pages views to less page views and I've managed to get the correct result.

The second task is to print the list of webpages showing unique page views and here I'm experiencing couple of issues.

Here is the code that prints the total page views ordered from high to low :

require 'open-uri'

log_read = File.read('webserver.log')

split_log = log_read.split("\n/") # split_log = array

split_log[0] = split_log[0].sub('/', '')

split_array = split_log.map { |line| line.split(' ') }

# Most views
container = Hash.new(0) # empty

split_array.each do |item|
  container[item[0]] += 1
end

sorted_container = container.sort_by { |_k, v| v }.reverse

# Number of page visits
sorted_container.each do |k, v|
  puts "#{k} has #{v} visits"
end

the result of the above code is : 
about/2 has 90 visits
contact has 89 visits
index has 82 visits
about has 81 visits
help_page/1 has 80 visits
home has 78 visits

Now for the second part where I'm asked to show the list of webpages with unique page views I was thinking to map the 'split_array' like this :

sorted_unique_views = split_array.map { |h| h.to_a }.uniq.map { |k, v| { k => v } }

which will give me an array of hashes : 
[
{"help_page/1"=>"126.318.035.038"}
{"contact"=>"184.123.665.067"}
{"home"=>"184.123.665.067"}
{"about/2"=>"444.701.448.104"}
{"help_page/1"=>"929.398.951.889"}
{"index"=>"444.701.448.104"}
{"help_page/1"=>"722.247.931.582"}
{"about"=>"061.945.150.735"}
{"help_page/1"=>"646.865.545.408"}
{"home"=>"235.313.352.950"}
{"help_page/1"=>"543.910.244.929"}
....etc ]

What I actually want is to somehow iterate over the sorted_unique_views=[{...},{...},etc] and sum the unique IP's correspondent to each page, the final result will look something like this :

help_page/1 23
contact 23
home 22
about/2 22
index 23
about 22

I have tried inject, iterating over the sorted_unique_views=[{...},{...},etc] , but i get either : 135 which is the sum of all the unique page views, or i get

{{"help_page/1"=>"126.318.035.038"}=>1} 

I would like some guidance and feedback if possible and also if the choice of splitting and then mapping is the right one in my case.

Many thanks

  • 1
    Welcome to SO! This question is a bit confusing to me. Can you post your input structure in valid Ruby (or log file), remove any unnecessary/working intermediate operations, show the desired output structure (a valid Ruby structure, not a line by line formatted print), and how the transformation logic from input to output works? Thanks for the clarification. – ggorlen Jun 20 '19 at 16:18
  • @ggorlen Hey man ! Right, so I have an array of hashes and I want to count how many times the key of each hash repeats itself. Example : [{"a" => "b"} {"c" => "d"} etc] I'm sorry I got you confused , but I was trying to show everything I have in my file so everyone can see the full picture. Thanks for your reply – user11652832 Jun 20 '19 at 16:47
  • 1
    I suggest you revise the examples in your question as follows. Show the content of the file you are reading. Limit that to, say, 10 lines. Then show the (Ruby object that is the) expected result for each part of your question. You should do the latter whenever you give an example. "most unique", like, "very unique", which is often heard in conversation, is meaningless, because if something is unique, it is a one-of-a-kind, so "most" adds nothing. Do you mean that, among all URLs that have unique numbers of views, you want the one that has the most views (and if a tie, any of the winners)? – Cary Swoveland Jun 20 '19 at 16:48
  • @CarySwoveland Thank you very much for your quick reply and for your advice! Apologies for any confusions. If you check my 'sorted_unique_views'-array of hashes- it already contains a list of unique IP's correspondent to each page. What I actually want is to iterate somehow and print each page and all the unique IPs that viewed that page – user11652832 Jun 20 '19 at 17:04
  • 1
    Please don't make more work for others by vandalizing your posts. By posting on the Stack Exchange (SE) network, you've granted a non-revocable right, under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license, for SE to distribute the content (i.e. regardless of your future choices). By SE policy, the non-vandalized version is distributed. Thus, any vandalism will be reverted. Please see: How does deleting work? …. If permitted to delete, there's a "delete" button below the post, on the left. You may need to use a browser, not the mobile app. – Makyen Jun 24 '19 at 7:47
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Create a test file

Let's first create a file1.

text =<<-END
/help_page/1 126.318.035.038
/contact 184.123.665.067
/home 184.123.665.067
/about/2 444.701.448.104
/help_page/1 929.398.951.889
/index 444.701.448.104
/help_page/1 722.247.931.582
/about 061.945.150.735
/help_page/1 646.865.545.408
/home 235.313.352.950
END

FNAME = 'log'
File.write(FNAME, text)
  #=> 256

Confirm it's contents.

puts File.read(FNAME)
/help_page/1 126.318.035.038
/contact 184.123.665.067
/home 184.123.665.067
...
/home 235.313.352.950

Read the file and construct a useful hash

h = File.foreach(FNAME).with_object(Hash.new { |h,k| h[k] = [] }) do |line,h|
  key, url = line[1..-2].split
  h[key] << url
end
  #=> {"help_page/1"=>["126.318.035.038", "929.398.951.889", "722.247.931.582",
  #                    "646.865.545.408"],
  #    "contact"    =>["184.123.665.067"],
  #    "home"       =>["184.123.665.067", "235.313.352.950"],
  #    "about/2"    =>["444.701.448.104"],
  #    "index"      =>["444.701.448.104"],
  #    "about"      =>["061.945.150.735"]} 

Use this hash to compute objects of interest

Determine the view count for each key

h.transform_values(&:count)
  #=> {"help_page/1"=>4, "contact"=>1, "home"=>2, "about/2"=>1, "index"=>1, "about"=>1} 

Create a list of decreasing page views

h.sort_by { |_,a| -a.size }
  #=> [["help_page/1", ["126.318.035.038", "929.398.951.889", "722.247.931.582",
  #                     "646.865.545.408"]],
  #    ["home",    ["184.123.665.067", "235.313.352.950"]],
  #    ["contact", ["184.123.665.067"]],
  #    ["about/2", ["444.701.448.104"]],
  #    ["index",   ["444.701.448.104"]],
  #    ["about",   ["061.945.150.735"]]] 

or, depending on requirements:

h.sort_by { |_,a| -a.size }.to_h
  #=> {"help_page/1"=>["126.318.035.038", "929.398.951.889", "722.247.931.582",
  #                    "646.865.545.408"],
  #    "home"       =>["184.123.665.067", "235.313.352.950"],
  #    "contact"    =>["184.123.665.067"],
  #    "about/2"    =>["444.701.448.104"],
  #    "index"      =>["444.701.448.104"],
  #    "about"      =>["061.945.150.735"]} 

Determine which keys were viewed just once

h.select { |_,a| a.size == 1 }
  #=> {"contact"=>["184.123.665.067"],
  #    "about/2"=>["444.701.448.104"],
  #    "index"=>["444.701.448.104"],
  #    "about"=>["061.945.150.735"]}

Explanation

See IO::write, IO::read, IO::foreach, Enumerator#with_object, Hash::new, Hash#transform_values, Enumerable#count and Enumerable#sort_by.2

The calculation of h could alternatively be written as follows.

h = {}
File.foreach(FNAME) do |line|
  key, url = line[1..-2].split
  h[key] = [] unless h.key?(key)
  h[key] << url
end
h

This explains .each_object and Hash.new { |h,k| h[k] = [] }. line[1..-2] lops off the first character of the line (/) and the newline character ("\n) at the end of the line.

h.transform_values(&:count)

is shorthand for:

h.transform_values { |v| v.count }

1. I've indented each line of the heredoc below 4 spaces, for formatting reasons. To run the code, first un-indent the lines of the heredoc.

2. Class and module methods are denoted by a double-colon between the class or module and the method name (e.g., IO::write); instance methods are denoted by a pound sign between the class or module and the instance method (e.g., Enumerator#each_object). IO methods are often invoked on the class File (e.g., File.foreach ... rather than IO.foreach ...). That is permissible because File is a subclass of IO and therefore inherits IO's class and instance methods.

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