35

There are many cases in which JavaScript's type-coercing equality operator is not transitive. For example, see "JavaScript equality transitivity is weird."

However, are there any cases in which == isn't symmetric? That is, where a == b is true and b == a is false?

30

In Javascript, == is always symmetric.

The spec says:

NOTE 2 The equality operators maintain the following invariants:

  • A != B is equivalent to !(A == B).
  • A == B is equivalent to B == A, except in the order of evaluation of A and B.
35

It's supposed to be symmetric. However, there is an asymmetric case in some versions of IE:

window == document; // true
document == window; // false
  • 11
    Wow, that's amazing. Could you specify which versions of IE this occurs in? – Trevor Burnham Apr 14 '11 at 21:35
  • Using IE10 on Win8.0 I see this behavior in "Browser Mode: IE8" (not in IE10, IE9, or IE7 mode). – Jeroen May 13 '14 at 19:51
10

The answer to your actual question (is the operator symmetric) is yes. The ECMA-262 spec explicitly states:

NOTE 2 The equality operators maintain the following invariants:

  • A != B is equivalent to !(A == B).
  • A == B is equivalent to B == A, except in the order of evaluation of A and B.
  • You can find a deep-linkable HTML version of the spec at ecma262-5.com – SLaks Apr 14 '11 at 20:53

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