1

why this two call to toBinary function compute the same output (at least under VS2010) ?

#include <iostream>
#include <bitset>
#include <limits>
using namespace std;

template<class T> bitset<sizeof(T)*CHAR_BIT> toBinary(const T num) 
{
    bitset<sizeof(T)*CHAR_BIT> mybits;
    const char * const p = reinterpret_cast<const char*>(&num);
    for (int i = sizeof(T)*CHAR_BIT-1 ; i >= 0 ; --i)
        mybits.set(i, (*(p)&(1<<i) ));
    return mybits;
}

int main() 
{
    cout << toBinary(8.9).to_string() << "\n"; 
    cout << toBinary( 8.9 + std::numeric_limits<double>::epsilon() ).to_string()  << "\n"; 
    cin.get();
}
5

That epsilon is relative to 1; here, instead, you are summing it to 8.9, which is more than 8 (2^3) times bigger than 1. This means that that epsilon would change a binary digit that is three digits to the right of the rightest digit stored in that double.

If you want to notice something change, you have to add at about 8.9*epsilon.

3
  • which value should I add to get the smallest increment, because if I add 8.8 for instance, I also get a change? Apr 14 '11 at 22:11
  • There is no single value that does what you want, but there is a library function - see my answer.
    – zwol
    Apr 14 '11 at 22:14
  • Hmmm, I too tested it and got that result, I think it depends on the exact internal representation of the number. A good rule of thumb is that number*epsilon gets you a value that, added to number, will certainly change it, while under it you don't have guarantees. Apr 14 '11 at 22:15
3

You have two problems. The first is that your toBinary function doesn't do what you wanted -- it should read like so (assuming a little-endian CPU):

template<class T> bitset<sizeof(T)*CHAR_BIT> toBinary(const T num)
{
    bitset<sizeof(T)*CHAR_BIT> mybits;
    const char * const p = reinterpret_cast<const char*>(&num);
    for (int i = sizeof(T)-1; i >= 0; i--)
        for (int j = CHAR_BIT-1; j >= 0; j--)
            mybits.set(i*CHAR_BIT + j, p[i] & (1 << j));
    return mybits;
}

The other problem is as Matteo describes: numeric_limits<double>::epsilon is the difference between 1.0 and the next larger representable value, not the difference between any floating point number and the next larger representable value. You can see this for yourself by modifying your program to try incrementing 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 -- adding epsilon will increment the second-to-last bit of 0.5, the last bit of 1.0, and have no effect on 2.0.

There is a way to do what you're trying to do, though: the nextafter family of functions (they're part of C99).

7
  • i don't get why ma function has a error.According to me (*(p)&(1<<i) will test each bit ? no ? Apr 15 '11 at 22:35
  • No, it wont. *p has type char, so it retrieves either the first or the last CHAR_BIT bits of your double (depending on endianness), and only those bits. So most of your loop is not reading bit i of the double, but a sign-extension copy of bit 7. To see the second and subsequent bytes of the double, you have to offset p before dereferencing it, which is what my modified loop does.
    – zwol
    Apr 15 '11 at 22:58
  • I don't get why it's (1<<j) and not (1<<i) Apr 16 '11 at 10:04
  • Because i is the byte index. Each loop iteration needs to access the bit at i*CHAR_BIT + j within the original value. If it used 1<<i, it wouldn't read every bit.
    – zwol
    Apr 16 '11 at 15:01
  • what is it not natural for me it is that for two differents bytes index (i=0 and i=8 for instance) we have the same mask (j=0)...so the mask doesn't match the correct position for i =0, at least in my mind... Apr 16 '11 at 17:37

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