3
>>> a = [1,2,3]
>>> a.pop()
3
>>> a
[1, 2]
>>> a = [1,2,3]
>>> a = a[:-1]
>>> a
[1, 2]
>>>

Is there any difference between the above methods to remove the last element from a list?

  • 2
    Yes, using pop modifies the list being referenced by a in-place in constant timw, whereas using the slice creates a new list and assigns that to a and works in linear time – juanpa.arrivillaga Jun 22 at 0:31
13

Yes. pop is O(1) and mutates the original list, while slice is O(n) and creates a copy of the list. Less formally, the pop method is an operation on the element at the end of the list and is defined in CPython as a call to list_resize(self, Py_SIZE(self) - 1);. This doesn't traverse the entire structure.

On the other hand, list_slice allocates a new list and loops over the entries in the old list ranging from the beginning to the end - 1, copying references to each item to the new list.

If what you're trying to do is remove the last element of the list, use pop.

  • 1
    pop can accept one index param, such as pop(0), in this case, is it still O(1)? – LiuXiMin Jun 22 at 0:20
  • 4
    Good question. No--pop is traditionally an O(1) operation on the "top" or back/right of a stack data structure. Lists in Python give pop an extra parameter to enable it to work on the middle, but the rest of the elements in the list need to by shifted forward to fill in the gap, O(n). Check the source code for the full story. There is a conditional that switches between pop() and pop(n)--the latter calls list_ass_slice(self, index, index+1, (PyObject *)NULL); which performs the shift-forward operation on the list. If you're using pop(0) frequently, look into collections.deque. – ggorlen Jun 22 at 0:23
  • Actually, if all you want to do is remove the last element of the list, del mylist[-1] is the way to go. You use pop when you want to remove the last element from the list and keep the value (which pop returns). del mylist[-1] has the same big O behaviors as pop, and it's directly syntax/bytecode supported, which is typically faster than function calls (though modern versions of CPython have been narrowing the gap by speeding up simple method calls). – ShadowRanger Jun 22 at 0:57
2

pop do not change the id, just pop one item of list.

[:-1] is slice operation, which create a new list from old list.

>>> a = [1,2,3]
print(id(a))
>>> a.pop()
3
print(id(a))
>>> a
[1, 2]
>>> a = [1,2,3]
>>> a = a[:-1]
>>> a
print(id(a))
[1, 2]
>>>

id output (the number is not important, same or not same is key point):

4470627464
4470627464
4474450952
  • notably, because pop mutates the list being referenced by a while the slice operation updates a to reference a new list, the primary difference arises when some other variable has a reference to the same list – Hamms Jun 22 at 0:12
1

the pop method returns the last item from the list that it removes. for example:

a = [1,2,3,4]
b = a.pop()
print(b)  # 4

Also, using slicing, you are making a copy of the old list, whereas with using pop the list reference remains the same.

0

The way you have presented them, there's no outward difference. The pop instruction gives the interpreter an easier time of optimizing the instruction, as it can merely decrement the length attribute of the list. The -1 assignment will construct a new list, assign that to a, and then leave the old one for garbage collection.

There is a huge difference in aliasing: if you assigned something else to that list, you will get side effects with pop. For instance:

>>> a = [1, 2, 3, 4]
>>> b = a
>>> b
[1, 2, 3, 4]
>>> a.pop()
4
>>> b
[1, 2, 3]
>>> a = a[:-1]
>>> b
[1, 2, 3]
>>> a
[1, 2]
  • 1
    Mind you, the slice can also perform those same side-effects if needed, by changing a = a[:-1] to a[:] = a[:-1]; instead of rebinding a to a new list, assigning to the "empty" slice replace the contents of the original list with the results of the slice. – ShadowRanger Jun 22 at 1:01
0

Yes there is difference. when you use a.pop() you remove from list too when you use a[:-1] object list not change check with len(a)

>>> a = [1,2,3]
>>> a
[1, 2, 3]
>>> a[:-1]
[1, 2]
>>> len(a[:-1])
2
>>> a.pop()
3
>>> a
[1, 2]
>>> len(a)
2
>>> 
0

There is an basic difference thats occurs using in functions . Using[:-1] unchanged the original list but pop() can do.

a = [1,2,3]
b = [1,2,3]


def functionb(list):
    list = list[:-1]
    return list
def withpop(list):
    return list.pop()

functionb(b)
withpop(a)
print b
print a

Will printed:

[1, 2, 3]
[1, 2]

Second is execution time . pop() is faster than [:-1] Because when you use [:-1]you have to overwrite to list.Lets say you have thousands values in index so it will be slowly than pop()

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