12

How do I use c# similar Math.Round with MidpointRounding.AwayFromZero in Delphi?

What will be the equivalent of:

double d = 2.125;
Console.WriteLine(Math.Round(d, 2, MidpointRounding.AwayFromZero));

Output: 2.13

In Delphi?

  • I don't think there is an out-of-the-box function that does that. There is up, down, to-wards zero and banker's rounding, but no AwayFromZero, I'm afraid. – GolezTrol Jun 24 at 8:43
12

What you're looking for is SimpleRoundTo function in combination with SetRoundMode. As the documentations says:

SimpleRoundTo returns the nearest value that has the specified power of ten. In case AValue is exactly in the middle of the two nearest values that have the specified power of ten (above and below), this function returns:

  • The value toward plus infinity if AValue is positive.

  • The value toward minus infinity if AValue is negative and the FPU rounding mode is not set to rmUp

Note that the second parameter to the function is TRoundToRange which refers to exponent (power of 10) rather than number of fractional digis in .NET's Math.Round method. Therefore to round to 2 decimal places you use -2 as round-to range.

uses Math, RTTI;

var
  LRoundingMode: TRoundingMode;
begin
  for LRoundingMode := Low(TRoundingMode) to High(TRoundingMode) do
  begin
    SetRoundMode(LRoundingMode);
    Writeln(TRttiEnumerationType.GetName(LRoundingMode));
    Writeln(SimpleRoundTo(2.125, -2).ToString);
    Writeln(SimpleRoundTo(-2.125, -2).ToString);
  end;
end;

rmNearest

2,13

-2,13

rmDown

2,13

-2,13

rmUp

2,13

-2,12

rmTruncate

2,13

-2,13

  • 8
    But beware that setting the rounding mode for this is using a global change to solve a local problem. This might cause problems (multi-threading, libraries, etc.). – Andreas Rejbrand Jun 24 at 8:52
  • 1
    @AndreasRejbrand That's correct. Delphi 7 (and even newer versions) is plagued with these global state dependent routines and as pointed out in the comment and other answer, it should be used with care. – Peter Wolf Jun 24 at 9:32
13

I believe the Delphi RTL's SimpleRoundTo function does essentially this, at least if the FPU rounding mode is "correct". Please read its documentation and implementation carefully, and then decide if it is good enough for your purposes.

But beware that setting the rounding mode for a single rounding operation like this is using a global change to solve a local problem. This might cause problems (multi-threading, libraries, etc.).

Bonus chatter: Had the question been about "regular" rounding (to an integer), I think I'd tried an approach like

function RoundMidpAway(const X: Real): Integer;
begin
  Result := Trunc(X);
  if Abs(Frac(X)) >= 0.5 then
    Inc(Result, Sign(X));
end;

instead.

Of course, it is possible to write a similar function even for the general case of n fractional digits. (But be careful to handle edge cases, overflows, floating-point issues, etc., correctly.)

Update: I believe the following does the trick (and is fast):

function RoundMidpAway(const X: Real): Integer; overload;
begin
  Result := Trunc(X);
  if Abs(Frac(X)) >= 0.5 then
    Inc(Result, Sign(X));
end;

function RoundMidpAway(const X: Real; ADigit: integer): Real; overload;
const
  PowersOfTen: array[-10..10] of Real =
    (
      0.0000000001,
      0.000000001,
      0.00000001,
      0.0000001,
      0.000001,
      0.00001,
      0.0001,
      0.001,
      0.01,
      0.1,
      1,
      10,
      100,
      1000,
      10000,
      100000,
      1000000,
      10000000,
      100000000,
      1000000000,
      10000000000
    );
var
  MagnifiedValue: Real;
begin
  if not InRange(ADigit, Low(PowersOfTen), High(PowersOfTen)) then
    raise EInvalidArgument.Create('Invalid digit index.');
  MagnifiedValue := X * PowersOfTen[-ADigit];
  Result := RoundMidpAway(MagnifiedValue) * PowersOfTen[ADigit];
end;

Of course, if you'd use this function in production code, you'd also add at least 50 unit test cases that test its correctness (to be run daily).

Update: I believe the following version is more stable:

function RoundMidpAway(const X: Real; ADigit: integer): Real; overload;
const
  FuzzFactor = 1000;
  DoubleResolution = 1E-15 * FuzzFactor;
  PowersOfTen: array[-10..10] of Real =
    (
      0.0000000001,
      0.000000001,
      0.00000001,
      0.0000001,
      0.000001,
      0.00001,
      0.0001,
      0.001,
      0.01,
      0.1,
      1,
      10,
      100,
      1000,
      10000,
      100000,
      1000000,
      10000000,
      100000000,
      1000000000,
      10000000000
    );
var
  MagnifiedValue: Real;
  TruncatedValue: Real;
begin

  if not InRange(ADigit, Low(PowersOfTen), High(PowersOfTen)) then
    raise EInvalidArgument.Create('Invalid digit index.');
  MagnifiedValue := X * PowersOfTen[-ADigit];

  TruncatedValue := Int(MagnifiedValue);
  if CompareValue(Abs(Frac(MagnifiedValue)), 0.5, DoubleResolution * PowersOfTen[-ADigit]) >= EqualsValue  then
    TruncatedValue := TruncatedValue + Sign(MagnifiedValue);

  Result := TruncatedValue * PowersOfTen[ADigit];

end;

but I haven't fully tested it. (Currently it passes 900+ unit test cases, but I don't consider the test suite quite sufficient yet.)

  • Might be a good idea to inline RoundMidpAway(const X: Real): Integer;. – Andreas Rejbrand Jun 24 at 9:55
  • 1
    RoundMidpAway(2.135, -2) results 2.13. should be 2.14 – zig Jun 24 at 13:01
  • 1
    @zig: Yeah, floating-point numbers are indeed difficult to work with, as hinted. In my defence, I suspected such issues could be present, thus my comment about extensive testing (which I intended to perform tonight). In this case, RoundMidpAway(2.135, -2), yields MagnifiedValue = 213.5 and Abs(Frac(X)) = 0.499999999999972, instead of the exact value 0.5. That's the reason. I'll try to fix this. – Andreas Rejbrand Jun 24 at 13:18
  • 1
    That's how floating-point numbers work. If you store a value in a double, which cannot be represented exactly, you lose information that can never be recovered. It won't help to upgrade it to an extended later. Try d := 2.135; e := 2.135; Writeln(extended(d) = e);. – Andreas Rejbrand Jun 25 at 9:04
  • 1
    My later version treats floating-points the way floating-points should be treated: by assuming some epsilon uncertainties. Thus, if the fractional part is a tiny bit below 0.5, I assume that's because of numerical issues, and still regard it as >= 0.5. The 1E-15 constant is especially suitable for double. – Andreas Rejbrand Jun 25 at 9:11

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