7

Trying to solve this challenge on codewars. According to the challenge, the parts of array:

ls = [0, 1, 3, 6, 10]

Are

ls = [0, 1, 3, 6, 10]
ls = [1, 3, 6, 10]
ls = [3, 6, 10]
ls = [6, 10]
ls = [10]
ls = []

And we need to return an array with the sums of those parts.

So my code is as follows:

function partsSums(ls) {
  let arrayOfSums = []; 
  while(ls.length > 0) {
    let sum = ls.reduce((a, b) => a + b);
    arrayOfSums.push(sum);
    ls.shift();
  }
return arrayOfSums;
}

console.log(partsSums([0, 1, 3, 6, 10]));

The issue is that it wants us to add the last sum 0 when the array is empty. So we should be getting:

[ 20, 20, 19, 16, 10, 0 ]

Instead of

[ 20, 20, 19, 16, 10]

So I tried this:

function partsSums(ls) {
  let arrayOfSums = []; 
  while(ls.length > 0) {
    let sum = ls.reduce((a, b) => a + b);
    arrayOfSums.push(sum);
    ls.shift();
  }
arrayOfSums.push(0);
return arrayOfSums;
}
console.log(partsSums([0, 1, 3, 6, 10]));

And this:

function partsSums(ls) {
  ls.push(0);
  let arrayOfSums = []; 
  while(ls.length > 0) {
    let sum = ls.reduce((a, b) => a + b);
    arrayOfSums.push(sum);
    ls.shift();
  }
return arrayOfSums;
}

But these caused execution time-out errors on Codewars:

Execution Timed Out (12000 ms)

So I also tried:

function partsSums(ls) {
  let arrayOfSums = []; 
  while(ls.length > -1) {
    let sum = ls.reduce((a, b) => a + b);
    arrayOfSums.push(sum);
    ls.shift();
  }
return arrayOfSums;
}

But now this causes a TypeError:

TypeError: Reduce of empty array with no initial value

I am not understanding the concept of how to get 0 into the array when all of the values have been shifted out. The challenge seems to want 0 as the final "sum" of the array, even when the array is empty. But you cannot reduce an empty array - what else can I do here?

EDIT: Tried adding initial value to the reduce method:

function partsSums(ls) {
  let arrayOfSums = []; 
  while(ls.length > 0) {
    let sum = ls.reduce((a, b) => a + b, 0);
    arrayOfSums.push(sum);
    ls.shift();
  }
return arrayOfSums;
}

Unfortunately this still fails the basic test :

expected [] to deeply equal [ 0 ]

  • 1
    I have tried to solve it myself. I don't know what else to try. I am not understanding the concept of how to add the sum of an empty array to the final array. Because you can't use reduce on an empty array. Any other ideas? – HappyHands31 Jun 24 at 15:01
  • Cant you just push 0 after the loop? – Kobe Jun 24 at 15:04
  • 2
    This: But you cannot reduce an empty array - that is not what that error message (TypeError: Reduce of empty array with no initial value) says. In fact, it is very specific: Please re-read the documentation for reduce: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… - and then reread the error message. – Randy Casburn Jun 24 at 15:05
  • 1
    @RandyCasburn "If no initialValue is supplied, the first element in the array will be used. Calling reduce() on an empty array without an initialValue will throw a TypeError." So perhaps reduce is not the best method to find the sum of the array. – HappyHands31 Jun 24 at 15:08
  • 1
    BINGO! But consider the iterator point too. – Randy Casburn Jun 24 at 15:11
10

There is no reason to compute the sum over and over. On a long array this will be very inefficient ( O(n²) ) and might explain your timeout errors. Compute the sum at the beginning and then subtract each element from it in a loop.

ls = [0, 1, 3, 6, 10]

function partsSums(ls) {
    let sum = ls.reduce((sum, n) => sum + n, 0)
    res  = [sum]
    for (let i = 1; i <= ls.length; i++){
        sum -= ls[i-1]
        res.push(sum )
    }
    return res
}
console.log(partsSums(ls))

  • It works. There are some things about it that I don't understand. What is ( O(n^2) )? XOR, right? – HappyHands31 Jun 24 at 15:25
  • O(n²) means that the number of calculations required grows exponentially as the length of your array grows. The reduce needs to look at every element in the array and you do that for every element in the array. – Mark Meyer Jun 24 at 15:28
  • 1
    @NinaScholz Are you talking about the initial reduce()? At least on chrome the overhead of the initial sum is much smaller than the penalty for unshift() in my tests. – Mark Meyer Jun 24 at 15:41
  • 1
    So, to break this down a bit more, we have the first sum as 20, then within the for-loop, we create the "result" array, initializing it to 20. Then we subtract ls[i - 1] from sum. So the first sum to get pushed into the result array from the for-loop will also be 20, because ls[i - 1] in this case is 0. Then 20 - 1, then 19 - 3, etc. Makes sense - thank you. – HappyHands31 Jun 24 at 15:47
  • 1
    @HappyHands31 per Mark Meyer's comment above, if you need to ask "What is ( O(n^2))" then you probably can benefit by being told explicitly this is called "Big-O" notation. – JimLohse Jun 24 at 23:09
4

Another solution that passed all of the tests:

function partsSums(ls) {
    let result = [0],
      l = ls.length - 1;
      
    for (let i = l; i >= 0; i--) {
        result.push(ls[i] + result[ l - i]);
    }
    return result.reverse();
}


console.log(partsSums([]));
console.log(partsSums([0, 1, 3, 6, 10])); 
console.log(partsSums([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]));
console.log(partsSums([744125, 935, 407, 454, 430, 90, 144, 6710213, 889, 810, 2579358]));

  • You could also do result.unshift(ls[i] + result[0]) and avoid reverse. – georg Jun 24 at 16:42
  • 1
    @georg unshift doesn't pass the test because it is slower than push+reverse – Fraction Jun 24 at 16:46
1

You could use for loop with slice and when i == 0 you can slice len + 1 which is going to return you empty array and sum will be 0.

function partsSums(arr) {
  const res = [], len = arr.length
  for (let i = len; i > -1; i--) {
    res.push(arr.slice(-i || len + 1).reduce((a, n) => a + n, 0))
  }
  return res;
}

console.log(partsSums([0, 1, 3, 6, 10]));
console.log(partsSums([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]));
console.log(partsSums([744125, 935, 407, 454, 430, 90, 144, 6710213, 889, 810, 2579358]));

You can also use two double reduce and if there is no next element push zero.

function partsSums(arr) {
  const sum = arr => arr.reduce((r, e) => r + e, 0);
  return arr.reduce((r, e, i, a) => {
    const res = sum(a.slice(i, a.length));
    return r.concat(!a[i + 1] ? [res, 0] : res)
  }, [])
}

console.log(partsSums([0, 1, 3, 6, 10]));
console.log(partsSums([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]));
console.log(partsSums([744125, 935, 407, 454, 430, 90, 144, 6710213, 889, 810, 2579358]));

1

try this with recursion :

function partsSums(ls) {
  let sum = ls.reduce((a, b) => a + b, 0);
  return  ls.length > 0 ? [sum].concat(partsSums(ls.slice(1))) : [0];
}

console.log(partsSums([0, 1, 3, 6, 10]));
console.log(partsSums([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]));
console.log(partsSums([744125, 935, 407, 454, 430, 90, 144, 6710213, 889, 810, 2579358]));

1

Here's one thing you could do

function partsSums(ls) {
  if(!ls.length) return [0];
  let prevTotal = ls.reduce((a,b) => a + b);
  return [prevTotal, ...ls.map(val => prevTotal -= val)]
}

console.log(partsSums([0, 1, 3, 6, 10]));

  • I like this also - can you please help me understand how the if(!ls.length) return [0] gets added to the end of the returned array? There aren't any loops that are reducing the length of ls? – HappyHands31 Jun 24 at 15:54
  • The if(!ls.length) return [0] is only used when the array passed in arguments is empty. The reason it returns a 0 at the end, is because it's always substracting the value to the total, so when you get to the last value (10), you then substract it (10 - 10) so it returns 0! For more info about the map method, you can check here. – Alexandre Fradette Jun 27 at 13:44
1

You could iterate from the end and take this value plus the last inserted value of the result set.

This approach works with a single loop and without calculating the maximum sum in advance.

function partsSums(ls) {
  var result = [0],
      i = ls.length;
      
  while (i--) {
      result.unshift(ls[i] + result[0]);
  }
  return result;
}

console.log(partsSums([0, 1, 3, 6, 10]));
console.log(partsSums([]));
.as-console-wrapper { max-height: 100% !important; top: 0; }

With push and reverse.

function partsSums(ls) {
  var result = [0],
      l = 0,
      i = ls.length;
      
  while (i--) result.push(l += ls[i]);
  return result.reverse();
}

console.log(partsSums([0, 1, 3, 6, 10]));
console.log(partsSums([]));
.as-console-wrapper { max-height: 100% !important; top: 0; }

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