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I learned a bit about async await pattern and I think I understand it to some extent. I know they are used to avoid blocking UI and mostly used in IO operations like DB or file access. I am now trying to refactor couple of MVC action methods to be async. While DB access makes perfect sense (e.g. EF's ToListAsync()), I am having problem with View Model generation and how (or if) it should be async as well.

Considering I had a method like this (pretty standard way in MVC I believe):

public PartialViewResult DoSomething()
    {
        var dataFromDb = _dataService.GetSomeData();
        var viewModel = Data2DataViewModel(dataFromDb);
        return PartialView("_SomePartialView", viewModel);
    }

I can change it to:

public async Task<PartialViewResult> DoSomethingAsync()
    {
        var dataFromDb = await _dataService.GetSomeDataAsync();
        var viewModel = Data2DataViewModel(dataFromDb);
        return PartialView("_SomePartialView", viewModel);
    }

That is fine but here is my question: should my method Data2DataViewModel also by async? And if yes: how would it need to be implemented, if it is mostly code like

public ViewModel Data2DataViewModel(DataFromDB dataFromDb)
{    
DataViewModel result = new DataViewModel()
    {
        Prop1 = dataFromDb.Prop,
        Prop2 = dataFromDb.SomeOtherProp
    };

    return result;
}

In general it does nothing more than taking the loaded data from DB and filling in properties of the VM. So no IO operations are involved. As per my understanding, only IO operations should be asynced as they are the ones that really may block the UI. But 90% percent of my DB operations in my app takes less than 0,5s so I am starting to wonder whether making methods async would actually gain me any boost and whether my understanding and thinking actually makes any sense. All answers appreciated!

  • Data2DataViewModel is a class and you are using it by doing new Data2DataViewModel. So you are creating object of that class by calling its constructor. Constructors can not be async. Only methods can be async. – Chetan Ranpariya Jun 25 '19 at 1:58
  • I don't think there is a hard and fast rule. There is no specific reason to make a method async if it doesn't await anything, and indeed you'll get a compiler warning if you do. But on the other hand, if you plan to add some async calls to it some time in the future, or if you are trying to be consistent with other methods (e.g. you're implementing an interface method that returns a Task) then there is no real harm in it, other than a tiny bit of overhead. – John Wu Jun 25 '19 at 2:27
  • Thanks for the comments. So do I understand it right that: as long as I do not await IO operations (DB, files...), even if a method may take some time (e.g. complex calculations), async will not help me? If processor is busy with some work on a method that does not perform IO, async will not change whether it blocks or not the UI, correct? – Muzzy Jun 25 '19 at 7:56
  • Adding async to a method does not magically make it run in the background in any way, you actually have to start some form of task and use await for anything to be different from a normal method call. – Lasse V. Karlsen Jun 25 '19 at 8:08
1

used to avoid blocking UI

For GUI applications, async is a good way to avoid blocking the UI thread. For ASP.NET applications (like the code you posted), async is used to get more scalability; there is no UI thread to unblock. See async ASP.NET for more information, particularly the second paragraph under "Asynchronous Code Is Not a Silver Bullet".

should my method Data2DataViewModel also by async?

Does that method do any asynchronous operations? If so, it should be asynchronous. If not, then it should be synchronous.

it does nothing more than taking the loaded data from DB and filling in properties of the VM. So no IO operations are involved.

Copying properties is purely synchronous, so the method should be synchronous.

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  • 1
    And that is exactly the answer I was looking for, thank you! – Muzzy Jun 25 '19 at 13:42

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