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I'm attempting to write a program in which there is an integer, called numwords, that specifies the number of words read from a file. However, I am testing it against a file that has fewer words than what the user inputs. For instance, I have the input

this

should

not 

work

in which numwords is 5 based on user input. I want to terminate the program with an exit code of 1, so I have written the following code to help me:

When I use files that have the appropriate number of words as the user inputs into numwords, not output appears to be printed out (the program has other functions that use wptrs to print values). Output was being printed before I added the while statement to my code. I feel that there is something wrong with my scanf statement in the while loop. Before I added to the while loop, I had used just the for loop and the commented-out scanf("%s", unused), and my program was working normally - input was being read in, and the appropriate output was used. I am just trying to implement a condition in which the above case with fewer words than numwords would fail, however.

//A huge chunk of memory that stores the null-terminated words contiguously
char chunk[MEMSIZE];

//Location of unused memory
char *unused = chunk;

//Points to words that reside inside of chunk
char *wptrs[MAX_WORDS];

/** Total number of words in the dictionary */
int numwords;

void readwords()
{
  int i = 0;
  while ((scanf("%s", unused)) != EOF) {
    for (i = 0; i < numwords; i++) {
      //Read in words and store them in chunk array
      //scanf("%s", unused);
      wptrs[i] = unused;
      unused += mystrlen(wptrs[i]) + 1;
    }
  }

  //Check to see if fewer input than specified
  if (numwords > i) {
    printf("%d", i);
    exit(EXIT_NUM_WORDS_BAD);
  }
}

I want this case to exit the program with an exit code of 1, but I find that it exits with a code of 0, as the main method just has return 0. Is there a way to exit with a code 1, and make my program work appropriately when there is an appropriate number of words that is equivalent to numwords? Thank you in advance.

  • What are you doing exactly? What's the purpose the for loop? What's the problem with n = scanf("%s %s %s %s %s", ...)? – Neil Jun 26 '19 at 3:28
  • @NeilEdelman For this program, I rely on user input. The user input dictates how much input I should expect, and if I have less than what is specified, I should exit the program. I feel like setting n in this way may not work? – Pomegranate Society Jun 26 '19 at 3:50
  • 1
    Your problem is that your numwords was (default-)initialized to zero and you're never changing its value. What would you expect to happen here!? Or... if it wasn't, then the for loop always iterates the i from 0 to numwords breaking the loop when it reaches numwords, and hence it is never less. – Antti Haapala Jun 26 '19 at 4:50
  • The user counting how many inputs seems like a problem computers could do easily and more accurately, for example, by reading the file twice, or, if it's processing on-line, allocate bigger and bigger chunks of capacity and have a count. – Neil Jun 27 '19 at 1:03
1

Revised example: breaks out of the while loop if the word quota is met or if EOF is read.

I've arbitrarily chosen 5 for words_expected (rather, numwords in the original code). Once five lines of input are read, the results will be printed. No explicit EOF is required. If EOF is met before 5 words, the error is printed and we exit with return code 1.

Per your comment, I added a check for whether a given line contains only digits. If it does, the program will cease to process the input.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <ctype.h>

#define MEMSIZE 1024
#define MAX_WORDS 5

//A huge chunk of memory that stores the null-terminated words contiguously
char chunk[MEMSIZE];

//Location of unused memory
char *unused = chunk;

//Points to words that reside inside of chunk
char *wptrs[MAX_WORDS];

/** Total number of words in the dictionary */
int words_expected = 5;

int contains_only_digits(char *s)
{
    int i = 0;
    for (i = 0; i < strlen(s); i++) {
        if (!isdigit(s[i])) {
            return 0;
        }
    }

    return 1;
}

void readwords()
{
    int words_read = 0;
    while (words_read < words_expected && scanf("%s", unused) != EOF) {
        // Read in words and store them in chunk array
        wptrs[words_read] = unused;
        if (contains_only_digits(wptrs[words_read])) {
            break;
        }
        unused += strlen(wptrs[words_read]) + 1;
        words_read++;
    }

    //Check to see if fewer input than specified
    if (words_read < words_expected) {
        printf("Expected %d words, but %d were provided\n", words_expected,
                words_read);
        exit(1);
    }
}

void printwords()
{
    int i = 0;
    for (i = 0; i < words_expected; i++) {
        printf("word %d: %s\n", i + 1, wptrs[i]); 
    }
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    readwords();
    printwords();
}

The contains_only_digits function is a naive implementation. It may be wise to use strtol and check errno if you are interested in best practices for determining whether a C string is a number.

| improve this answer | |
  • I had actually tried this earlier too but it failed against a file that had numwords as 6 and 6 words. That's why I had originally used the for loop. I think with the method you listed, an input with the correct number of words that match numwords might still be failing bc i is incremented from 0 onwards? – Pomegranate Society Jun 26 '19 at 2:58
  • Is it expected that one word is entered on each line? If so, the test program I posted will exit with a 0 as long as 5 or more words are provided. i is initialized to 0, but it should represent exactly the number of words that were read with scanf. – gdea73 Jun 26 '19 at 3:01
  • I think another important aspect about the files I'm reading (which I definitely forget to mention), is that files that are appropriate also have integers that follow after, that should not be read. Is there any way to impose a condition in which if an integer is read, then the program should stop reading the input? – Pomegranate Society Jun 26 '19 at 3:08
  • I've updated my response to stop once the expected number of words are read, and to print the results. Hopefully that works for your use case. Please let me know if there are any other issues you find with it. Edit (having just seen your latest comment): yes, you could check isdigit() for each character in wptrs[words_read] within your while loop. If you find that the "word" contains only digits this way, then you could break out of the loop. – gdea73 Jun 26 '19 at 3:08
  • 1
    Your solution worked absolutely perfect. I cannot thank you enough! – Pomegranate Society Jun 26 '19 at 4:13

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