539

I want to fill out a string with spaces. I know that the following works for zero's:

>>> print  "'%06d'"%4
'000004'

But what should I do when I want this?:

'hi    '

of course I can measure string length and do str+" "*leftover, but I'd like the shortest way.

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  • 1
    I know it might be deprecated in the future, but I still like this good old method: "%-6s" % s for left-aligned and "%6s" % s for right-aligned. – Basj Nov 26 '19 at 10:07

13 Answers 13

745

You can do this with str.ljust(width[, fillchar]):

Return the string left justified in a string of length width. Padding is done using the specified fillchar (default is a space). The original string is returned if width is less than len(s).

>>> 'hi'.ljust(10)
'hi        '
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  • 21
    @simon 's answer is more flexible and more useful when formatting more complex strings – CoatedMoose Jul 27 '13 at 7:08
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    or @abbot 's if you are stuck supporting old versions of python – CoatedMoose Jul 27 '13 at 7:25
  • 1
    ljust() is now deprecated. See stackoverflow.com/questions/14776788/… for the correct way to do it – Mawg says reinstate Monica Jan 21 '15 at 8:41
  • Its gone in python 3? Just wanted to add there is also rjust and center which work much the same way but for different alignments – radtek Jan 22 '15 at 13:37
  • 21
    ljust(), rjust() have been deprecated from the string module only. They are available on the str builtin type. – Rohan Grover Jun 30 '15 at 21:07
410

For a flexible method that works even when formatting complicated string, you probably should use the string-formatting mini-language, using either the str.format() method

>>> '{0: <16} StackOverflow!'.format('Hi')  # Python >=2.6
'Hi               StackOverflow!'

of f-strings

>>> f'{"Hi": <16} StackOverflow!'  # Python >= 3.6
'Hi               StackOverflow!'
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  • 13
    What if you have '16' in a variable? – Randy Jun 2 '14 at 16:54
  • I figured that out as well too. Should have posted it. The docs say this should work for Py2.6, but my findings are otherwise. Works in Py2.7 though. – Randy Jun 4 '14 at 4:01
  • 1
    I had problems with this type of formatting when I was using national accents. You would want 'kra' and 'krá' to be the same, but they were not. – quapka Oct 27 '14 at 10:46
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    @Randy '{message: <{fill}}'.format(message='Hi', fill='16') – CivFan Jan 25 '15 at 0:13
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    Don't use str.format() for templates with only a single {...} and nothing else. Just use the format() function and save yourself the parsing overhead: format('Hi', '<16'). – Martijn Pieters Jan 7 '18 at 16:29
129

The new(ish) string format method lets you do some fun stuff with nested keyword arguments. The simplest case:

>>> '{message: <16}'.format(message='Hi')
'Hi             '

If you want to pass in 16 as a variable:

>>> '{message: <{width}}'.format(message='Hi', width=16)
'Hi              '

If you want to pass in variables for the whole kit and kaboodle:

'{message:{fill}{align}{width}}'.format(
   message='Hi',
   fill=' ',
   align='<',
   width=16,
)

Which results in (you guessed it):

'Hi              '

And for all these, you can use python 3.6 f-strings:

message = 'Hi'
fill = ' '
align = '<'
width = 16
f'{message:{fill}{align}{width}}'

And of course the result:

'Hi              '
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  • How would you handle varying the message as well? msgs = ['hi', 'hello', 'ciao'] – ak_slick Apr 3 at 17:07
  • 1
    @ak_slick You can pass in variables instead of hard-coded values into the format function. – CivFan Apr 3 at 18:32
81

You can try this:

print "'%-100s'" % 'hi'
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  • print "'%-6s'" % 'hi' indeed!! – taper Apr 15 '11 at 12:44
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    @simon as someone stuck on a python2.5 system this answer helped me, not a useless answer +1 – sunshinekitty Jul 5 '14 at 11:49
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    Not deprecated any more in 3.3+ – Seppo Erviälä Feb 16 '15 at 11:23
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    I like this common printf syntax much better. Allows you to write complex strings without countless concatenations. – Max Tsepkov Jun 8 '15 at 9:22
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    For completeness, "'%+100s'" % 'hi' would work for putting spaces to the right of 'hi' – Eric Blum May 8 '18 at 20:44
64

Correct way of doing this would be to use Python's format syntax as described in the official documentation

For this case it would simply be:
'{:10}'.format('hi')
which outputs:
'hi '

Explanation:

format_spec ::=  [[fill]align][sign][#][0][width][,][.precision][type]
fill        ::=  <any character>
align       ::=  "<" | ">" | "=" | "^"
sign        ::=  "+" | "-" | " "
width       ::=  integer
precision   ::=  integer
type        ::=  "b" | "c" | "d" | "e" | "E" | "f" | "F" | "g" | "G" | "n" | "o" | "s" | "x" | "X" | "%"

Pretty much all you need to know is there ^.

Update: as of python 3.6 it's even more convenient with literal string interpolation!

foo = 'foobar'
print(f'{foo:10} is great!')
# foobar     is great!
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39

Use str.ljust():

>>> 'Hi'.ljust(6)
'Hi    '

You should also consider string.zfill(), str.ljust() and str.center() for string formatting. These can be chained and have the 'fill' character specified, thus:

>>> ('3'.zfill(8) + 'blind'.rjust(8) + 'mice'.ljust(8, '.')).center(40)
'        00000003   blindmice....        '

These string formatting operations have the advantage of working in Python v2 and v3.

Take a look at pydoc str sometime: there's a wealth of good stuff in there.

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  • 1
    Thanks for pointing out the str.center(n) method. It was just what i was looking for and didn't even know its existance. :D – Luke Savefrogs Nov 1 at 5:58
28

As of Python 3.6 you can just do

>>> strng = 'hi'
>>> f'{strng: <10}'

with literal string interpolation.

Or, if your padding size is in a variable, like this (thanks @Matt M.!):

>>> to_pad = 10
>>> f'{strng: <{to_pad}}'
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  • 4
    f'{strng: >10}' for filling string with leading whitespace to a length of 10. That is magic. And it is not well documented. – Chang Ye Mar 24 '19 at 7:57
  • @changye I believe this is also the default behavior of f'{strng:10}'. – WAF Mar 24 '19 at 9:52
17

you can also center your string:

'{0: ^20}'.format('nice')
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7

Use Python 2.7's mini formatting for strings:

'{0: <8}'.format('123')

This left aligns, and pads to 8 characters with the ' ' character.

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  • 4
    @simon already gave this answer... why posting a duplicate answer? – Felix Kling Apr 15 '11 at 13:25
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    I didn't click the 'new responses have been posted, click to refresh' and so missed it. – aodj Apr 17 '11 at 20:43
5

Just remove the 0 and it will add space instead:

>>> print  "'%6d'"%4
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2

Wouldn't it be more pythonic to use slicing?

For example, to pad a string with spaces on the right until it's 10 characters long:

>>> x = "string"    
>>> (x + " " * 10)[:10]   
'string    '

To pad it with spaces on the left until it's 15 characters long:

>>> (" " * 15 + x)[-15:]
'         string'

It requires knowing how long you want to pad to, of course, but it doesn't require measuring the length of the string you're starting with.

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  • 9
    No it wouldn't. – Mad Physicist Oct 22 '15 at 14:27
  • 1
    Can you elaborate on that? It's not that I don't believe you, I just want to understand why. – Zev Chonoles Oct 22 '15 at 15:16
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    Sure. The most pythonic way would be to use one of the builtin functions rather than using a homegrown solution as much as possible. – Mad Physicist Oct 22 '15 at 15:21
  • @MadPhysicist saying that slicing is less pythonic because you should use in built functions is like saying ''.join(reversed(str)) is more pythonic than str[::-1], and we all know that's not true. – Nick Feb 15 '17 at 15:02
  • @NickA. That is not a very good analogy. The case you are using as an example is quite valid. However, (x + " " * 10)[:10] is in my opinion much more convoluted than using x.ljust(10). – Mad Physicist Feb 15 '17 at 17:03
0

A nice trick to use in place of the various print formats:

(1) Pad with spaces to the right:

('hi' + '        ')[:8]

(2) Pad with leading zeros on the left:

('0000' + str(2))[-4:]
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  • 1
    For some reason this is the funniest answer but I like it. Along those lines also consider: min_len = 8 then ('hi' + ' '*min_len)[:min_len] or ('0'*min_len + str(2))[-min_len] – Poikilos Jan 25 at 20:43
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    For the number, it would be ('0'*min_len + str(2))[-min_len:] rather, though this is only for fun, and I recommend the other answers. – Poikilos Feb 28 at 13:12
-4

You could do it using list comprehension, this'd give you an idea about the number of spaces too and would be a one liner.

"hello" + " ".join([" " for x in range(1,10)])
output --> 'hello                 '
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  • ...and then you get a string that is 22 (len("hello")+17 :( ) characters long--that didn't go well. While we are being funny we could do s = "hi" ; s + (6-len(s)) * " " instead (it is ok when the result is negative). However, answers which use whatever framework feature that addresses the exact issue will be easier to maintain (see other answers). – Poikilos Jan 25 at 20:58
  • Doesn't answer the question, the amount of space needed is unknown as str lengths vary. – misantroop Oct 10 at 1:38

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