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I made a multi-process insertion sort program with Elixir. However, when run on a 32 core machine, it is slower than a single process insertion sort. If the processes sending messages are running on different cores, I believe that synchronization between cores may be the cause of the delay. Is there a way to find out which processes are running on which cores or how to control which processes run on which cores?

defmodule Insertion do
  def insert(l, x) do
    case l do
      [h | hs] -> if x < h, do: [x | l], else: [h | insert(hs, x)]
      [] -> [x]
      _ -> inspect l
    end
  end

  def insertion_sort(l, x, []) do
    insert(l, x)
  end

  def insertion_sort(l, x, [y | ys]) do
    insert(l, x)
    |> insertion_sort(y, ys)
  end

  def sort(l) do
    case l do
      [] -> l
      [_] -> l
      [x | [y | xs]] -> insertion_sort([y], x, xs)
    end
  end


  #
  # Parallel
  #

  def send_to_next(x, y, :end) do
    insert_par(x, spawn(Insertion, :insert_par, [y, :end]))
  end

  def send_to_next(x, y, p) do
    send p, y
    insert_par(x, p)
  end

  def insert_par(x, next) do
    receive do
      {:ret, p} -> send p, {x, next}
      y -> if x < y, do: send_to_next(x, y, next), else: send_to_next(y, x, next)
    end
  end

  def insertion_sort_par([], _) do

  end

  def insertion_sort_par([x | xs], p) do
    send p, x
    insertion_sort_par(xs, p)
  end

  def ret_val(l, p) do
    send p, {:ret, self()}
    receive do
      {x, :end} -> [x | l]
      {x, next} -> ret_val([x | l], next)
    end
  end

  def sort_par([]) do
    []
  end

  def sort_par([x | xs]) do
    root = spawn(Insertion, :insert_par, [x, :end])
    IO.puts inspect :timer.tc(Insertion, :insertion_sort_par, [xs, root])
    ret_val([], root)
    |> Enum.reverse
  end

  def run(n) do
    x = floor :math.pow(10, n)
    l = Enum.map(1..x, fn _ -> floor :rand.uniform * x end)
    :timer.tc(Insertion, :sort_par, [l])
    |> inspect
    |> IO.puts
  end

end

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  • I'd guess that you can control + monitor this via the BEAM virtual machine - erlang.org/doc/man/erlang.html#system_flag_schedulers_online might be worth a check – Frank Schmitt Jun 26 at 8:34
  • You can check what scheduler the current process is running on with erlang:system_info(scheduler_id). Note that schedulers may move between cores unless they're bound, using erl +sbt and other flags. – legoscia Jun 26 at 9:25
  • I believe you can limit (via the command line) the number of processors which Elixir will employ. Check the +A and the +P flags. Look here for more details on these flags. Honestly, as far as which cores are running which processes the answer is "you shouldn't care". I'd be really leery of an approach that assumes performance is dependent on which core is running which process. – Onorio Catenacci Jun 27 at 13:04
  • @OnorioCatenacci I used the + P option to increase the number of processes when running a program against a large list. However, the + A option is not used. What does the number of threads mean? – Y.Tsunekawa Jun 27 at 15:06
  • @legoscia Your answer is very helpful for me. Is a process that is called repeatedly by recursive calls likely to move the scheduler each time it is called? If so, is there a way to lock the process to a particular scheduler? – Y.Tsunekawa Jun 27 at 15:10
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Is there a way to find out which processes are running on which cores or how to control which processes run on which cores?

I'm not aware of a way to see which processes are on which CPU/scheduler, but in Observer it is possible to see scheduler utilization.

If you run :observer.start(), you can look under the "Load Charts" tab. The top graph shows the utilization of each scheduler over time. If one is overutilized while the others are underutilized, you'll see it there.

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