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I try to create an elliptic public key by calculate the point on curve from a given number ( my private key ), so I have the coordinates (x,y) of elliptic curve point

I get the coordinates by

myPublicKeyCoordinates = myPrivateKeyValue * GPointOnCurve

How can i build the PEM ( or DER ) file for my public key?

I don't care about language (java, python, javascript, ...)
because i want to known how build the file ( even if i write every single byte... )

1 Answer 1

5

Assuming you already know about ITU-T X.680-201508 (the ASN.1 language) and ITU-T X.690-201508 (the BER (and CER) and DER encodings for ASN.1 data), the main defining document for Elliptic Curve Keys and their representation is https://www.secg.org/sec1-v2.pdf from the Standards for Efficient Cryptography Group (not the US Securites and Exchange Commission).

Section C.3 (Syntax for Elliptic Curve Public Keys) says that the general transport container for an EC public key is the X.509 SubjectPublicKeyInfo structure:

SubjectPublicKeyInfo ::= SEQUENCE {
    algorithm AlgorithmIdentifier {{ECPKAlgorithms}} (WITH COMPONENTS
        {algorithm, parameters}) ,
    subjectPublicKey BIT STRING
}

The possible "algorithms" (which really means key encoding types) is the open-ended set

ECPKAlgorithms ALGORITHM ::= {
    ecPublicKeyType |
    ecPublicKeyTypeRestricted |
    ecPublicKeyTypeSupplemented |
    {OID ecdh PARMS ECDomainParameters {{SECGCurveNames}}} |
    {OID ecmqv PARMS ECDomainParameters {{SECGCurveNames}}},
    ...
}

ecPublicKeyType ALGORITHM ::= {
    OID id-ecPublicKey PARMS ECDomainParameters {{SECGCurveNames}}
}

...

ECDomainParameters came from C.2:

ECDomainParameters{ECDOMAIN:IOSet} ::= CHOICE {
    specified SpecifiedECDomain,
    named ECDOMAIN.&id({IOSet}),
    implicitCA NULL
}

C.3 mentions about halfway through

The elliptic curve public key (a value of type ECPoint that is an OCTET STRING) is mapped to a subjectPublicKey (a value encoded as type BIT STRING) as follows: The most significant bit of the value of the OCTET STRING becomes the most significant bit of the value of the BIT STRING and so on with consecutive bits until the least significant bit of the OCTET STRING becomes the least significant bit of the BIT STRING.

So we seek backwards and find

An elliptic curve point itself is represented by the following type

ECPoint ::= OCTET STRING

whose value is the octet string obtained from the conversion routines given in Section 2.3.3.

2.3.3 (Elliptic-Curve-Point-to-Octet-String Conversion) has a lot of words, but the best supported format is not using point compression (and P != the point at infinity)

  1. If P = (xP , yP ) != O and point compression is not being used, proceed as follows:

3.1. Convert the field element xP to an octet string X of length (log2 q)/8 octets using the conversion routine specified in Section 2.3.5.

3.2. Convert the field element yP to an octet string Y of length (log2 q)/8 octets using the conversion routine specified in Section 2.3.5.

3.3. Output M = 0416 || X || Y .

2.3.5 is a whole lot of words for "big endian byte order of a length long enough to hold all values in the field" (aka "leave in leading zeros").

So now we party.

Given the FIPS 186-3 reference key on secp256r1 (d=70A12C2DB16845ED56FF68CFC21A472B3F04D7D6851BF6349F2D7D5B3452B38A),

Q is (8101ECE47464A6EAD70CF69A6E2BD3D88691A3262D22CBA4F7635EAFF26680A8, D8A12BA61D599235F67D9CB4D58F1783D3CA43E78F0A5ABAA624079936C0C3A9)

And the public key DER looks like

// SubjectPublicKeyInfo
30 XA
   // AlgorithmIdentifier
   30 XB
      // AlgorithmIdentifier.id (id-ecPublicKey (1.2.840.10045.2.1))
      06 07 2A 86 48 CE 3D 02 01
      // AlgorithmIdentifier.parameters, using the named curve id (1.2.840.10045.3.1.7)
      06 08 2A 86 48 CE 3D 03 01 07
   // SubjectPublicKeyInfo.subjectPublicKey
   03 XC 00
      // Uncompressed public key
      04
      // Q.X
      81 01 EC E4 74 64 A6 EA D7 0C F6 9A 6E 2B D3 D8
      86 91 A3 26 2D 22 CB A4 F7 63 5E AF F2 66 80 A8
      // Q.Y
      D8 A1 2B A6 1D 59 92 35 F6 7D 9C B4 D5 8F 17 83
      D3 CA 43 E7 8F 0A 5A BA A6 24 07 99 36 C0 C3 A9

Count up all the bytes for XA, XB, and XC:

XC = 32 (Q.X) + 32 (Q.Y) + 1 (0x04) + 1 (0x00 for the unused bits) = 66 = 0x42

XB = 19 = 0x13

XA is then 66 + 19 + 2 (tag bytes) + 2 (length bytes) = 89 = 0x59

(And, of course, if any of our length values exceeded 0x7F we would have had to encode them correctly)

So now we are left with

30 59 30 13 06 07 2A 86 48 CE 3D 02 01 06 08 2A
86 48 CE 3D 03 01 07 03 42 00 04 81 01 EC E4 74
64 A6 EA D7 0C F6 9A 6E 2B D3 D8 86 91 A3 26 2D
22 CB A4 F7 63 5E AF F2 66 80 A8 D8 A1 2B A6 1D
59 92 35 F6 7D 9C B4 D5 8F 17 83 D3 CA 43 E7 8F
0A 5A BA A6 24 07 99 36 C0 C3 A9

And, we verify:

$ xxd -r -p | openssl ec -text -noout -inform der -pubin
read EC key
<paste, then hit CTRL+D>
30 59 30 13 06 07 2A 86 48 CE 3D 02 01 06 08 2A
86 48 CE 3D 03 01 07 03 42 00 04 81 01 EC E4 74
64 A6 EA D7 0C F6 9A 6E 2B D3 D8 86 91 A3 26 2D
22 CB A4 F7 63 5E AF F2 66 80 A8 D8 A1 2B A6 1D
59 92 35 F6 7D 9C B4 D5 8F 17 83 D3 CA 43 E7 8F
0A 5A BA A6 24 07 99 36 C0 C3 A9
Private-Key: (256 bit)
pub:
    04:81:01:ec:e4:74:64:a6:ea:d7:0c:f6:9a:6e:2b:
    d3:d8:86:91:a3:26:2d:22:cb:a4:f7:63:5e:af:f2:
    66:80:a8:d8:a1:2b:a6:1d:59:92:35:f6:7d:9c:b4:
    d5:8f:17:83:d3:ca:43:e7:8f:0a:5a:ba:a6:24:07:
    99:36:c0:c3:a9
ASN1 OID: prime256v1
NIST CURVE: P-256

Printing it as "Private-Key: (256-bit)" is just a bug/quirk of the tool, there's no private key there.

Things are harder for specified parameter curves, but those don't interoperate well (https://www.rfc-editor.org/rfc/rfc5480#section-2.1.1 says that a conforming CA MUST NOT use the specified parameter form, or the implicit form, but MUST use the named form).

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