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Using a 4x4x4 grid as an example, I have 64 vertices (which I’ll call particles) which start with specific positions relative to each other. These 64 particles will move in the x, y and z directions, losing their initial positions relative to each other. However each cycle, the new particle positions and velocities need to be calculated based upon the original starting relationships between a particle and its original neighbors.

I’ve learned that I need to use textures, and consequently Framebuffers for this, and am now able to write two 3DTextures which flip-flop to provide the writing and reading functionality to perform this. However, in the next cycle when gl_FragCoord is passed to the fragment shader, with a particle’s new position (could be switched with another particle for instance), I don’t see any mechanism by which the original coordinate of the texture which held a particle’s information will be written with a particle’s current information. Is there some mechanism I’m not understanding that allows moving particles to have their data stored in a static grid (the 3D texture), with each particle’s data always populating the same coordinate, so I can use a texelFetch to grab a particle’s data, as well as the original neighbors’ data? Can I change gl_FragCoord, and have a pixel output where I want, or is it an unchangeable input variable?

Once I resolve this issue, I’m hoping to then implement a Transform Feedback to perform the actual movement of the vertices without dumping a texture to the CPU and extracting the position data and reuploading it to the GPU for the next cycle.

Are there any suggestions for how to keep track of each particle’s original position, original neighbors, and current position relative to those original neighbors using textures written in Framebuffers?

  • I don't understand your mis-understanding. What is the different between a JavaScript native array newState = oldState.map(computeNewStateFromOld); and your GPU version of the same thing? In both cases particle index 0 is always particle 0, particle index 1 is always particle 1. – gman Jun 27 '19 at 1:52
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I’m confused about your confusion 😄

Here’s a simple JavaScript only particle system. Each particle starts at a random location and moves in a random direction

'use strict';

const ctx = document.querySelector('canvas').getContext('2d')
const {width, height} = ctx.canvas;

const numParticles = 128;
const particleParameters = [];  // info that does not change
let currentParticleState = [];  // info that does change
let nextParticleState = [];     // computed from currentState

for (let i = 0; i < numParticles; ++i) {
  particleParameters.push({
    velocity: [rand(-100, 100), rand(-100, 100)],
  });
  currentParticleState.push({
    position: [rand(0, width), rand(0, height)],
  });
  nextParticleState.push({
    position: [0, 0],
  });
}


function rand(min, max) {
  return Math.random() * (max - min) + min;
}

function euclideanModulo(n, m) {
  return (( n % m) + m) % m;
}

let then = 0;
function render(now) {
  now *= 0.001;  // convert to seconds
  const deltaTime = now - then;
  then = now;

  for (let i = 0; i < numParticles; ++i) {
    const curPos = currentParticleState[i].position;
    const nxtPos = nextParticleState[i].position;
    const data = particleParameters[i];
    
    nxtPos[0] = euclideanModulo(curPos[0] + data.velocity[0] * deltaTime, width);
    nxtPos[1] = euclideanModulo(curPos[1] + data.velocity[1] * deltaTime, height);    
  }
  
  const t = nextParticleState;
  nextParticleState = currentParticleState;
  currentParticleState = t;

  ctx.clearRect(0, 0, width, height);
  for (let i = 0; i < numParticles; ++i) {
    const [x, y] = currentParticleState[i].position;
    ctx.fillRect(x - 1, y - 1, 3, 3);
  }
  

  requestAnimationFrame(render);
}
requestAnimationFrame(render);
canvas { border: 1px solid black; }
<canvas></canvas>

Here’s the same particle system still in JavaScript but running more like WebGL runs. I don’t know if this will be more or less confusing. The important points are the code that updates the particle positions called fragmentShader doesn’t get to choose what it’s updating. It just updates gl.outColor. It also has no inputs except gl.fragCoord and gl.currentProgram.uniforms. currentParticleState is an array of 4 value arrays where as before it was an array of objects with a position property. particleParameters is also just an array of 4 value arrays instead of an array of objects with a velocity value. This is to simulate the fact that these would be textures in real WebGL so any meaning like position or velocity is lost.

The code that actually draws the particles is irrelevant.

'use strict';

const ctx = document.querySelector('canvas').getContext('2d')
const {width, height} = ctx.canvas;

const numParticles = 128;
const particleParameters = [];  // info that does not change
let currentParticleState = [];  // info that does change
let nextParticleState = [];     // computed from currentState

for (let i = 0; i < numParticles; ++i) {
  particleParameters.push(
    [rand(-100, 100), rand(-100, 100)],
  );
  currentParticleState.push(
    [rand(0, width), rand(0, height)],
  );
  nextParticleState.push(
    [0, 0],
  );
}


function rand(min, max) {
  return Math.random() * (max - min) + min;
}

function euclideanModulo(n, m) {
  return (( n % m) + m) % m;
}


const gl = {
  fragCoord: [0, 0, 0, 0],
  outColor: [0, 0, 0, 0],
  currentProgram: null,
  currentFramebuffer: null,
  
  bindFramebuffer(fb) {
    this.currentFramebuffer = fb;
  },
  
  createProgram(vs, fs) {
    return {
      vertexShader: vs,  // not using
      fragmentShader: fs,
      uniforms: {
      },
    }
  },
  
  useProgram(p) {
    this.currentProgram = p;
  },
  
  uniform(name, value) {
    this.currentProgram.uniforms[name] = value;
  },
  
  draw(count) {
    for (let i = 0; i < count; ++i) {
      this.fragCoord[0] = i + .5;
      this.currentProgram.fragmentShader();
      this.currentFramebuffer[i][0] = this.outColor[0];
      this.currentFramebuffer[i][1] = this.outColor[1];
      this.currentFramebuffer[i][2] = this.outColor[2];
      this.currentFramebuffer[i][3] = this.outColor[3];
    }
  },
};


// just to make it look more like GLSL
function texelFetch(sampler, index) {
  return sampler[index];
}

// notice this function has no inputs except
// `gl.fragCoord` and `gl.currentProgram.uniforms`
// and it just writes to `gl.outColor`. It doesn't
// get to choose where to write. That is handled
// by `gl.draw`
function fragmentShader() {
  // to make the code below more readable
  const {
    resolution, 
    deltaTime,
    currentState,
    particleParams,
  } = gl.currentProgram.uniforms;
  
  const i = Math.floor(gl.fragCoord[0]);
  const curPos = texelFetch(currentState, i);
  const data = texelFetch(particleParameters, i);
    
  gl.outColor[0] = euclideanModulo(curPos[0] + data[0] * deltaTime, resolution[0]);
  gl.outColor[1] = euclideanModulo(curPos[1] + data[1] * deltaTime, resolution[1]);
}


const prg = gl.createProgram(null, fragmentShader);

let then = 0;
function render(now) {
  now *= 0.001;  // convert to seconds
  const deltaTime = now - then;
  then = now;

  gl.bindFramebuffer(nextParticleState);
  gl.useProgram(prg);
  gl.uniform('deltaTime', deltaTime);
  gl.uniform('currentState', currentParticleState);
  gl.uniform('particleParameters', particleParameters);
  gl.uniform('resolution', [width, height]);
  gl.draw(numParticles);
  
  const t = nextParticleState;
  nextParticleState = currentParticleState;
  currentParticleState = t;

  // not relavant!!!
  ctx.clearRect(0, 0, width, height);
  for (let i = 0; i < numParticles; ++i) {
    const [x, y] = currentParticleState[i];
    ctx.fillRect(x - 1, y - 1, 3, 3);
  }
  
  requestAnimationFrame(render);
}
requestAnimationFrame(render);
canvas { border: 1px solid black; }
<canvas></canvas>

Here’s the same code in actual WebGL

'use strict';

function main() {
  const gl = document.querySelector('canvas').getContext('webgl2')
  if (!gl) {
    return alert('sorry, need webgl2');
  }
  const ext = gl.getExtension('EXT_color_buffer_float');
  if (!ext) {
    return alert('sorry, need EXT_color_buffer_float');
  }
  
  const {width, height} = gl.canvas;

  const numParticles = 128;
  const particleParameters = [];  // info that does not change
  let currentParticleState = [];  // info that does change
  let nextParticleState = [];     // computed from currentState

  for (let i = 0; i < numParticles; ++i) {
    particleParameters.push(rand(-100, 100), rand(-100, 100), 0, 0);
    currentParticleState.push(rand(0, width), rand(0, height), 0, 0);
  }


  function rand(min, max) {
    return Math.random() * (max - min) + min;
  }

  const particleParamsTex = twgl.createTexture(gl, {
    src: new Float32Array(particleParameters),
    internalFormat: gl.RGBA32F,
    width: numParticles,
    height: 1,
    minMax: gl.NEAREST,
  });
  const currentStateTex = twgl.createTexture(gl, {
    src: new Float32Array(currentParticleState),
    internalFormat: gl.RGBA32F,
    width: numParticles,
    height: 1,
    minMax: gl.NEAREST,
  });
  const nextStateTex = twgl.createTexture(gl, {
    internalFormat: gl.RGBA32F,
    width: numParticles,
    height: 1,
    minMax: gl.NEAREST,
  });

  let currentStateFBI = twgl.createFramebufferInfo(gl, [
    { attachment: currentStateTex, },
  ], numParticles, 1);
  let nextStateFBI = twgl.createFramebufferInfo(gl, [
    { attachment: nextStateTex, },
  ], numParticles, 1);

  const particleVS = `
  #version 300 es
  in vec4 position;
  void main() {
    gl_Position = position;
  }
  `;

  const particleFS = `
  #version 300 es
  precision highp float;

  uniform vec2 resolution;
  uniform float deltaTime;
  uniform sampler2D particleParamsTex;
  uniform sampler2D currentStateTex;

  out vec4 outColor;

  vec4 euclideanModulo(vec4 n, vec4 m) {
    return mod(mod(n, m) + m, m);
  }

  void main() {
    int i = int(gl_FragCoord.x);
    vec4 curPos = texelFetch(currentStateTex, ivec2(i, 0), 0);
    vec4 velocity = texelFetch(particleParamsTex, ivec2(i, 0), 0);

    outColor = euclideanModulo(curPos + velocity * deltaTime, vec4(resolution, 1, 1));
  }

  `;

  const drawVS = `
  #version 300 es
  uniform sampler2D currentStateTex;
  uniform vec2 resolution;
  void main() {
    gl_PointSize = 3.0;
    // we calculated pos in pixel coords 
    vec4 pos = texelFetch(currentStateTex, ivec2(gl_VertexID, 0), 0);
    gl_Position = vec4(
       pos.xy / resolution * 2. - 1.,  // convert to clip space
       0,
       1);
  }
  `;

  const drawFS = `
  #version 300 es
  precision mediump float;
  out vec4 outColor;
  void main() {
    outColor = vec4(0, 0, 0, 1);
  }
  `;

  const particleProgramInfo = twgl.createProgramInfo(gl, [particleVS, particleFS]);
  const drawProgramInfo = twgl.createProgramInfo(gl, [drawVS, drawFS]);

  const quadBufferInfo = twgl.primitives.createXYQuadBufferInfo(gl, 2);

  let then = 0;
  function render(now) {
    now *= 0.001;  // convert to seconds
    const deltaTime = now - then;
    then = now;

    twgl.bindFramebufferInfo(gl, nextStateFBI);
    gl.useProgram(particleProgramInfo.program);
    twgl.setBuffersAndAttributes(gl, particleProgramInfo, quadBufferInfo);
    twgl.setUniforms(particleProgramInfo, {
      resolution: [width, height],
      deltaTime: deltaTime,
      currentStateTex: currentStateFBI.attachments[0],
      particleParamsTex,
    });
    twgl.drawBufferInfo(gl, quadBufferInfo);

    const t = nextStateFBI;
    nextStateFBI = currentStateFBI;
    currentStateFBI = t;  

    twgl.bindFramebufferInfo(gl, null);
    gl.useProgram(drawProgramInfo.program);
    twgl.setUniforms(drawProgramInfo, {
      resolution: [width, height],
      currentStateTex: currentStateFBI.attachments[0],
    });
    gl.drawArrays(gl.POINTS, 0, numParticles);

    requestAnimationFrame(render);
  }
  requestAnimationFrame(render);
}

main();
canvas { border: 1px solid black; }
<canvas></canvas>
<script src="https://twgljs.org/dist/4.x/twgl-full.min.js"></script>

| improve this answer | |
  • It was your comment at the beginning "I’m confused about your confusion" which solved my conceptual problem. I realized that each particle's data MUST occupy the same texel through time, so I then saw where you set the new position data in the DrawVS. I hadn't been thinking that for the draw phase I could specify the position with values I calculated and saved in the calculation phase.The WebGL snippet isn't working on my computer. I only see a subset of the particles, and they aren't moving. For future viewers you might want to fix it? Both the javascript snippets work fine. Thanks. – billvh Jun 27 '19 at 21:00
  • Fixed! Wow, that took 2 hours to track down. It was my bug, a name mis-match. I'm guessing worked on one machine and not the other by luck of uniform locations. Meaning because of the name mis-match I wasn't setting a uniform. On one machine texture unit 0, since uniforms default to 0, was something that worked, on the other machine that wasn't the case. The driver choose a different order for the shader uniform locations. I've thought before about writing some debugging wrapper to check that I set every uniform. Maybe it's time to do that :P – gman Jun 28 '19 at 5:55

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