609

What are all the array initialization syntaxes that are possible with C#?

13 Answers 13

640

These are the current declaration and initialization methods for a simple array.

string[] array = new string[2]; // creates array of length 2, default values
string[] array = new string[] { "A", "B" }; // creates populated array of length 2
string[] array = { "A" , "B" }; // creates populated array of length 2
string[] array = new[] { "A", "B" }; // created populated array of length 2

Note that other techniques of obtaining arrays exist, such as the Linq ToArray() extensions on IEnumerable<T>.

Also note that in the declarations above, the first two could replace the string[] on the left with var (C# 3+), as the information on the right is enough to infer the proper type. The third line must be written as displayed, as array initialization syntax alone is not enough to satisfy the compiler's demands. The fourth could also use inference. So if you're into the whole brevity thing, the above could be written as

var array = new string[2]; // creates array of length 2, default values
var array = new string[] { "A", "B" }; // creates populated array of length 2
string[] array = { "A" , "B" }; // creates populated array of length 2
var array = new[] { "A", "B" }; // created populated array of length 2 
  • 38
    @Joshua, I suggest moving the acceptance tick over to Eric Lippert's answer. His is much more complete and will serve a greater benefit to those with similar questions. – Anthony Pegram Apr 15 '11 at 14:52
  • 6
    Don't forget about new[] { "A", "B" } – theMayer Mar 24 '18 at 21:09
410

The array creation syntaxes in C# that are expressions are:

new int[3]
new int[3] { 10, 20, 30 }
new int[] { 10, 20, 30 }
new[] { 10, 20, 30 }

In the first one, the size may be any non-negative integral value and the array elements are initialized to the default values.

In the second one, the size must be a constant and the number of elements given must match. There must be an implicit conversion from the given elements to the given array element type.

In the third one, the elements must be implicitly convertible to the element type, and the size is determined from the number of elements given.

In the fourth one the type of the array element is inferred by computing the best type, if there is one, of all the given elements that have types. All the elements must be implicitly convertible to that type. The size is determined from the number of elements given. This syntax was introduced in C# 3.0.

There is also a syntax which may only be used in a declaration:

int[] x = { 10, 20, 30 };

The elements must be implicitly convertible to the element type. The size is determined from the number of elements given.

there isn't an all-in-one guide

I refer you to C# 4.0 specification, section 7.6.10.4 "Array Creation Expressions".

  • 8
    @BoltClock: The first syntax you mention is an "implicitly typed array creation expression". The second is an "anonymous object creation expression". You do not list the other two similar syntaxes; they are "object initializer" and "collection initializer". – Eric Lippert Apr 15 '11 at 14:48
  • 11
    Not exactly C# "syntax", but let's not forget (my personal favorite) Array.CreateInstance(typeof(int), 3)! – Jeffrey L Whitledge Apr 15 '11 at 15:38
  • 15
    @Jeffrey: If we're going down that road,it starts getting silly. E.g., "1,2,3,4".split(','). – Brian Apr 15 '11 at 18:00
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    Then for multi-dimensional arrays, there exist "nested" notations like new int[,] { { 3, 7 }, { 103, 107 }, { 10003, 10007 }, };, and so on for int[,,], int[,,,], ... – Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jun 7 '13 at 14:23
  • 6
    @Learning-Overthinker-Confused: You have two horses. You wish to know which is faster. Do you (1) race the horses, or (2) ask a stranger on the internet who has never seen the horses which one he thinks is faster? Race your horses. You want to know which one is more "efficient"? First create a measurable standard for efficiency; remember, efficiency is value produced per unit cost, so define your value and cost carefully. Then write the code both ways and measure its efficiency. Use science to answer scientific questions, not asking random strangers for guesses. – Eric Lippert Jan 31 '18 at 15:07
98

Non-empty arrays

  • var data0 = new int[3]

  • var data1 = new int[3] { 1, 2, 3 }

  • var data2 = new int[] { 1, 2, 3 }

  • var data3 = new[] { 1, 2, 3 }

  • var data4 = { 1, 2, 3 } is not compilable. Use int[] data5 = { 1, 2, 3 } instead.

Empty arrays

  • var data6 = new int[0]
  • var data7 = new int[] { }
  • var data8 = new [] { } and int[] data9 = new [] { } are not compilable.

  • var data10 = { } is not compilable. Use int[] data11 = { } instead.

As an argument of a method

Only expressions that can be assigned with the var keyword can be passed as arguments.

  • Foo(new int[2])
  • Foo(new int[2] { 1, 2 })
  • Foo(new int[] { 1, 2 })
  • Foo(new[] { 1, 2 })
  • Foo({ 1, 2 }) is not compilable
  • Foo(new int[0])
  • Foo(new int[] { })
  • Foo({}) is not compilable
  • 14
    It would be good to more clearly separate the invalid syntaxes from the valid ones. – jpmc26 Nov 17 '15 at 18:34
  • Are the given examples complete? Is there any other case? – Artificial Odorless Armpit Mar 3 at 11:28
43
Enumerable.Repeat(String.Empty, count).ToArray()

Will create array of empty strings repeated 'count' times. In case you want to initialize array with same yet special default element value. Careful with reference types, all elements will refer same object.

  • 4
    Yes, in var arr1 = Enumerable.Repeat(new object(), 10).ToArray(); you get 10 references to the same object. To create 10 distinct objects, you can use var arr2 = Enumerable.Repeat(/* dummy: */ false, 10).Select(x => new object()).ToArray(); or similar. – Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jun 10 '14 at 13:28
17
var contacts = new[]
{
    new 
    {
        Name = " Eugene Zabokritski",
        PhoneNumbers = new[] { "206-555-0108", "425-555-0001" }
    },
    new 
    {
        Name = " Hanying Feng",
        PhoneNumbers = new[] { "650-555-0199" }
    }
};
  • How are you supposed to use this structure? Is it like a dictionary? – R. Navega Jul 24 '18 at 19:02
  • 1
    @R.Navega it's an ordinary array :) – grooveplex Jan 22 at 22:11
14

In case you want to initialize a fixed array of pre-initialized equal (non-null or other than default) elements, use this:

var array = Enumerable.Repeat(string.Empty, 37).ToArray();

Also please take part in this discussion.

12

Example to create an array of a custom class

Below is the class definition.

public class DummyUser
{
    public string email { get; set; }
    public string language { get; set; }
}

This is how you can initialize the array:

private DummyUser[] arrDummyUser = new DummyUser[]
{
    new DummyUser{
       email = "abc.xyz@email.com",
       language = "English"
    },
    new DummyUser{
       email = "def@email.com",
       language = "Spanish"
    }
};
6
int[] array = new int[4]; 
array[0] = 10;
array[1] = 20;
array[2] = 30;

or

string[] week = new string[] {"Sunday","Monday","Tuesday"};

or

string[] array = { "Sunday" , "Monday" };

and in multi dimensional array

    Dim i, j As Integer
    Dim strArr(1, 2) As String

    strArr(0, 0) = "First (0,0)"
    strArr(0, 1) = "Second (0,1)"

    strArr(1, 0) = "Third (1,0)"
    strArr(1, 1) = "Fourth (1,1)"
  • 4
    Hi, the last block of examples appear to be Visual Basic, the question asks for c# examples. – Alex KeySmith Mar 7 '15 at 11:46
6

Repeat without LINQ:

float[] floats = System.Array.ConvertAll(new float[16], v => 1.0f);
3
For Class initialization:
var page1 = new Class1();
var page2 = new Class2();
var pages = new UIViewController[] { page1, page2 };
2

Another way of creating and initializing an array of objects. This is similar to the example which @Amol has posted above, except this one uses constructors. A dash of polymorphism sprinkled in, I couldn't resist.

IUser[] userArray = new IUser[]
{
    new DummyUser("abc@cde.edu", "Gibberish"),
    new SmartyUser("pga@lna.it", "Italian", "Engineer")
};

Classes for context:

interface IUser
{
    string EMail { get; }       // immutable, so get only an no set
    string Language { get; }
}

public class DummyUser : IUser
{
    public DummyUser(string email, string language)
    {
        m_email = email;
        m_language = language;
    }

    private string m_email;
    public string EMail
    {
        get { return m_email; }
    }

    private string m_language;
    public string Language
    {
        get { return m_language; }
    }
}

public class SmartyUser : IUser
{
    public SmartyUser(string email, string language, string occupation)
    {
        m_email = email;
        m_language = language;
        m_occupation = occupation;
    }

    private string m_email;
    public string EMail
    {
        get { return m_email; }
    }

    private string m_language;
    public string Language
    {
        get { return m_language; }
    }

    private string m_occupation;
}
0

You can also create dynamic arrays i.e. you can first ask the size of the array from the user before creating it.

Console.Write("Enter size of array");
int n = Convert.ToInt16(Console.ReadLine());

int[] dynamicSizedArray= new int[n]; // Here we have created an array of size n
Console.WriteLine("Input Elements");
for(int i=0;i<n;i++)
{
     dynamicSizedArray[i] = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());
}

Console.WriteLine("Elements of array are :");
foreach (int i in dynamicSizedArray)
{
    Console.WriteLine(i);
}
Console.ReadKey();
0

Trivial solution with expressions. Note that with NewArrayInit you can create just one-dimensional array.

NewArrayExpression expr = Expression.NewArrayInit(typeof(int), new[] { Expression.Constant(2), Expression.Constant(3) });
int[] array = Expression.Lambda<Func<int[]>>(expr).Compile()(); // compile and call callback

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