57

I'm programming a game in java which is made up of a grid of tiles. I wan't to be able to inuitively define the edges of the tiles and how they relate to each other, e.g. to get the opposite edge of a tile, I want to be able to just type TOP.opposite(). However, when using enums to define these edges I end up having to forward reference at least two of them in the contstructor:

public enum Edge {

   TOP(Edge.BOTTOM), //illegal forward reference
   BOTTOM(Edge.TOP),
   LEFT(Edge.RIGHT), //illegal forward reference
   RIGHT(Edge.LEFT);

   private Edge opposite;

   private Edge(Edge opp){
      this.opposite = opp;
   }

   public Edge opposite(){
      return this.opposite;
   }
}

Is there any way of getting round this problem using enums which is just as simple?

11 Answers 11

74

You can do this which is not as intuitive.

public enum Edge {
    TOP, BOTTOM, LEFT, RIGHT;
    private Edge opposite;

    static {
        TOP.opposite = BOTTOM;
        BOTTOM.opposite = TOP;
        LEFT.opposite = RIGHT;
        RIGHT.opposite = LEFT;
    }
    public Edge opposite(){
        return this.opposite;
    }
}
  • Unfortunately, if the enum is needed in the static initializer of another class, then you can get the exception class .....EnumName not an enum. I will have to use Maps... – P.Péter Feb 18 '15 at 16:55
  • @P.Péter There should be no problem using an Enum anywhere in another class, static initializer or anywhere else. – Peter Lawrey Feb 18 '15 at 17:18
  • @PeterLawrey You are right, I made another mistake which resulted in the mentioned exception. Your solution works just fine! – P.Péter Feb 24 '15 at 15:21
  • Different when the property is final and public. – TheRealChx101 Mar 27 '17 at 1:56
  • @MattLBeck Is it guaranteed that reference on enum instance has already run the static block when client receives it? I suspect you are leaking not fully iniliazed enum instance. The line TOP.opposite = BOTTOM Just after that if client calls TOP.opposite.opposite you will get in some cases undefined behaviour. – Rob May 18 '17 at 8:02
16
enum Edge {
    TOP {
        @Override
        public Edge opposite() {
            return BOTTOM;
        }
    },
    BOTTOM {
        @Override
        public Edge opposite() {
            return TOP;
        }
    },
    LEFT {
        @Override
        public Edge opposite() {
            return RIGHT;
        }
    },
    RIGHT {
        @Override
        public Edge opposite() {
            return LEFT;
        }
    };

    public abstract Edge opposite();
}
12
public enum Edge {

    TOP,
    BOTTOM(Edge.TOP),
    LEFT,
    RIGHT(Edge.LEFT);

    private Edge opposite;

    private Edge() {

    }
    private Edge(Edge opp) {
        this.opposite = opp;
        opp.opposite = this;
    }

    public Edge opposite() {
        return this.opposite;
    }
}
  • It makes so much concise sense! We could even write TOP, LEFT first – clwhisk Jun 25 '16 at 0:46
6

Here's another way

public enum Edge {

    TOP("BOTTOM"),
    BOTTOM("TOP"),
    LEFT("RIGHT"),
    RIGHT("LEFT");

    private String opposite;

    private Edge(String opposite){
        this.opposite = opposite;
    }

    public Edge opposite(){
        return valueOf(opposite);
    }

}

Peter Lawrey's solution is however more efficient and compiletime safe.

5

You can also make use of an static innerclass inside the enum:

public enum EnumTest     
{     
NORTH( Orientation.VERTICAL ),     
SOUTH( Orientation.VERTICAL ),     
EAST( Orientation.HORIZONTAL ),     
WEST( Orientation.HORIZONTAL );     

private static class Orientation  
{  
private static final String VERTICAL = null;     
private static final String HORIZONTAL = null;     
}
}

Stolen from here :)

3

You could just define a method similar to the one below.

public enum Edge {
    TOP,
    BOTTOM,
    LEFT,
    RIGHT;

    public Edge opposite() {
        switch (this) {
            case TOP:
                return Edge.BOTTOM;
            case BOTTOM:
                return Edge.TOP;
            case LEFT:
                return RIGHT;
            case RIGHT:
                return LEFT;
            default:
                throw new RuntimeException("Oh dear");
        }
    }
}
3

You can create a static Map where key is the original enum and the value the opposite edge. Initialize it in a static block and the return the mapping from the opposite() method.

private static Map<Edge, Edge> oppostiteMapping;

static {
  oppositeMapping = new EnumMap<Edge, Edge>();
  oppositeMapping.put(TOP, BOTTOM);
  ...
}

public Edge opposite() {
    return oppositeMapping.get(this);
} 

EDIT: as proposed in comment better to use EnumMap, so I upgraded accordingly

Btw. this approach is generally useful when you create something like static fromString() method etc.

1

You could use an internal Map instead to define these associations. This works if at the point of initializing the Map, you already have all enum values created:

public enum Edge {

  TOP,
  BOTTOM,
  LEFT,
  RIGHT;

  private static final Map<Edge, Edge> opposites = 
        new EnumMap<Edge, Edge>(Edge.class);
  static {
    opposites.put(TOP, BOTTOM);
    opposites.put(BOTTOM, TOP);
    opposites.put(LEFT, RIGHT);
    opposites.put(RIGHT, LEFT);
  }

  public Edge opposite(){
    return opposites.get(this);
  }
}
1

My method is by using ordinal. This is a simple example, but for a much more complex example see below.

public enum Edge {
    // Don't change the order! This class uses ordinal() in an arithmetic context.
    TOP,    // = 0
    LEFT,   // = 1
    RIGHT,  // = 2
    BOTTOM; // = 3

    public Edge other() {
        return values()[3 - ordinal()];
    }
}

Although using ordinal is discouraged for being fragile, using ordinal in the same enum as it's defined in is less fragile, and it's further mitigated here with a comment. Though the example above is quite trivial, the next example is less so. Compare the original way and the way using ordinal:

From 98 lines:

public enum Axes {
    NONE,
    HORIZONTAL,
    VERTICAL,
    BOTH;

    public Axes add(Axes axes) {
        switch (axes) {
            case HORIZONTAL:
                if (this == NONE)
                    return HORIZONTAL;
                if (this == VERTICAL)
                    return BOTH;
                break;
            case VERTICAL:
                if (this == NONE)
                    return VERTICAL;
                if (this == HORIZONTAL)
                    return BOTH;
                break;
            case BOTH:
                return BOTH;
            default:
                throw new AssertionError(axes);
        }
        return this;
    }

    public Axes remove(Axes axes) {
        switch (axes) {
            case HORIZONTAL:
                if (this == HORIZONTAL)
                    return NONE;
                if (this == BOTH)
                    return VERTICAL;
                break;
            case VERTICAL:
                if (this == VERTICAL)
                    return NONE;
                if (this == BOTH)
                    return HORIZONTAL;
                break;
            case BOTH:
                return NONE;
            default:
                throw new AssertionError(axes);
        }
        return this;
    }

    public Axes toggle(Axes axes) {
        switch (axes) {
            case NONE:
                return this;
            case HORIZONTAL:
                switch (this) {
                    case NONE:
                        return HORIZONTAL;
                    case HORIZONTAL:
                        return NONE;
                    case VERTICAL:
                        return BOTH;
                    case BOTH:
                        return VERTICAL;
                    default:
                        throw new AssertionError(axes);
                }
            case VERTICAL:
                switch (this) {
                    case NONE:
                        return VERTICAL;
                    case HORIZONTAL:
                        return BOTH;
                    case VERTICAL:
                        return NONE;
                    case BOTH:
                        return HORIZONTAL;
                    default:
                        throw new AssertionError(axes);
                }
            case BOTH:
                switch (this) {
                    case NONE:
                        return BOTH;
                    case HORIZONTAL:
                        return VERTICAL;
                    case VERTICAL:
                        return HORIZONTAL;
                    case BOTH:
                        return NONE;
                    default:
                        throw new AssertionError(axes);
                }
            default:
                throw new AssertionError(axes);
        }
    }
}

to 19 lines:

public enum Axes {
    // Don't change the order! This class uses ordinal() as a 2-bit bitmask.
    NONE,       // = 0 = 0b00
    HORIZONTAL, // = 1 = 0b01
    VERTICAL,   // = 2 = 0b10
    BOTH;       // = 3 = 0b11

    public Axes add(Axes axes) {
        return values()[ordinal() | axes.ordinal()];
    }

    public Axes remove(Axes axes) {
        return values()[ordinal() & ~axes.ordinal()];
    }

    public Axes toggle(Axes axes) {
        return values()[ordinal() ^ axes.ordinal()];
    }
}
0

I preferred this:

public enum Edge {
   TOP,
   BOTTOM,
   LEFT,
   RIGHT;

   private Link link;

   private Link getLink() {
     if (link == null) {
        link = Link.valueOf(name());
     }
     return link;
   }

   public Edge opposite() {
      return getLink().opposite();
   }
}

public enum Link {
   TOP(Edge.BOTTOM),
   BOTTOM(Edge.TOP),
   LEFT(Edge.RIGHT),
   RIGHT(Edge.LEFT);

   private Edge opposite;

   private Link(Edge opp) {
      this.opposite = opp;
   }

   public Edge opposite() {
      return this.opposite;
   }
}
-1

With Java 8 lambdas:

public enum Edge {
  TOP(() -> Edge.BOTTOM),
  BOTTOM(() -> Edge.TOP),
  LEFT(() -> Edge.RIGHT),
  RIGHT(() -> Edge.LEFT);

  private Supplier<Edge> opposite;

  private Edge(Supplier<Edge> opposite) {
    this.opposite = opposite;
  }

  public Edge opposite() {
    return opposite.get();
  }
}
  • 2
    While theoretically this makes sense and seems like a lacy way to solve the problem this still results in the compiler error "illegal forward reference" – Spen Oct 21 '17 at 16:38

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