347

I'd like to check if two arrays are equal. I mean: same size, same index, same values. How can I do that?

Using !== as suggested by a user, I expect that the following would print enter if at least one element in the array(s) are different, but in fact it does not.

if (($_POST['atlOriginal'] !== $oldAtlPosition) 
    or ($_POST['atl'] !== $aext) 
    or ($_POST['sidesOriginal'] !== $oldSidePosition) 
    or ($_POST['sidesOriginal'] !== $sideext)) {

    echo "enter";
}
5
  • 19
    You are using an = too much, it should be !== or !=
    – jeroen
    Apr 15, 2011 at 22:29
  • 35
    Just for the record (since my edit got changed back to "an user") it is "a user": english.stackexchange.com/questions/105116/…
    – teynon
    Jun 6, 2013 at 1:33
  • 11
    ['a'] == [0] is true. Well, this is just PHP. Oct 15, 2016 at 19:00
  • 3
    @DávidHorváth it's really weird, a good practice it to use always ===
    – AFA Med
    Jun 19, 2018 at 12:05
  • 4
    @DávidHorváth, loose comparison is loose not only in PHP. If you look at JS you'll be surprised. Just don't use until you understand things better. Mar 29, 2019 at 7:47

18 Answers 18

647
$arraysAreEqual = ($a == $b); // TRUE if $a and $b have the same key/value pairs.
$arraysAreEqual = ($a === $b); // TRUE if $a and $b have the same key/value pairs in the same order and of the same types.

See Array Operators.

EDIT

The inequality operator is != while the non-identity operator is !== to match the equality operator == and the identity operator ===.

14
  • 99
    A side note: This approach works for multidimensional arrays as well (it wasn't that obvious for me before).
    – trejder
    Sep 23, 2013 at 8:41
  • 5
    PS: solution is to use array_values($a)==array_values($b)... Another usual problem is about unique values, so remember that exist array_unique(). Oct 15, 2014 at 10:53
  • 2
    Saying == checks for matching key/value pairs is a little misleading. It appears to actually check the values == each other. So you might be surprised to find that array(0) == array('not zero') is true.
    – Andrew
    Jul 31, 2015 at 16:59
  • 53
    @nawfal: Your assumption is wrong. ['a', 'b'] is an array [0 => 'a', 1 => 'b'], while ['b', 'a'] is an array [0 => 'b', 1 => 'a']. That's why they don't have the same key/value pairs as stated in my answer and that's why == does not work between those. Nov 15, 2015 at 13:00
  • 41
    @StefanGehrig oh you're right. I will leave my comment as such to make my foolishness evident :)
    – nawfal
    Nov 15, 2015 at 13:03
111

According to this page.

NOTE: The accepted answer works for associative arrays, but it will not work as expected with indexed arrays (explained below). If you want to compare either of them, then use this solution. Also, this function may not works with multidimensional arrays (due to the nature of array_diff function).

Testing two indexed arrays, which elements are in different order, using $a == $b or $a === $b fails, for example:

<?php
    (array("x","y") == array("y","x")) === false;
?>

That is because the above means:

array(0 => "x", 1 => "y") vs. array(0 => "y", 1 => "x").

To solve that issue, use:

<?php
function array_equal($a, $b) {
    return (
         is_array($a) 
         && is_array($b) 
         && count($a) == count($b) 
         && array_diff($a, $b) === array_diff($b, $a)
    );
}
?>

Comparing array sizes was added (suggested by super_ton) as it may improve speed.

7
  • 3
    Attention: does not work as expected with multidimensional arrays
    – maersu
    Apr 9, 2014 at 16:13
  • 10
    The above comment is false. If $b has all the elements $a has plus some extra ones, the two arrays are not equal yet the above code will say they are.
    – Ghola
    Sep 8, 2014 at 12:14
  • 3
    might be worth adding count($a) == count($b) too
    – stefan
    Sep 7, 2016 at 10:20
  • 2
    @super_ton: yes, before calling array_diff could speed-up the comparison. I will add it. Thanks
    – lepe
    Sep 8, 2016 at 0:35
  • 7
    Unfortunately, it does not work in some cases, for example, I've tested with the following case $a = [1, 2, 2]; $b = [2, 1, 1]; and it returned true, but the two arrays are obviously not the same.
    – AwesomeGuy
    Sep 28, 2018 at 13:00
40

Try serialize. This will check nested subarrays as well.

$foo =serialize($array_foo);
$bar =serialize($array_bar);
if ($foo == $bar) echo "Foo and bar are equal";
3
  • 9
    Problematic if the keys and values are shifted around just like using comparison. However, assuming they are expected to be 100% the same, this is the cleanest and easiest way to check deep equality!
    – Kevin Peno
    Aug 21, 2013 at 20:59
  • 2
    I guess this is the best solution! It can compare multidimensional and associative arrays if they were previously sorted! Jul 24, 2014 at 14:41
  • if the array is considered a SET, this doesn't work: it should be sorted on all nested levels to be able to check if the same items are included in any order. Oct 20, 2020 at 22:21
33

Short solution that works even with arrays which keys are given in different order:

public static function arrays_are_equal($array1, $array2)
{
    array_multisort($array1);
    array_multisort($array2);
    return ( serialize($array1) === serialize($array2) );
}
3
  • 7
    Probably the best answer so far, most of the answers either don't match if the keys are shifted or if it's a multidimensional array.
    – AwesomeGuy
    Sep 28, 2018 at 13:06
  • Good choice! But note, that this method uses strict types comparsion, so if you want to compare [1,2,3] and ['1','2','3'] result would be false.
    – ChronoExp
    Jun 25, 2020 at 20:02
  • Note that this won't work with numerically indexed arrays where you care about the index value. array_multisort() which will re-index numeric keys.
    – Costa
    May 25 at 5:38
13

Compare them as other values:

if($array_a == $array_b) {
  //they are the same
}

You can read about all array operators here: http://php.net/manual/en/language.operators.array.php Note for example that === also checks that the types and order of the elements in the arrays are the same.

1
  • 7
    Or === depending on the desired behavior. Apr 15, 2011 at 15:28
12
function compareIsEqualArray(array $array1,array $array2):bool
{

   return (array_diff($array1,$array2)==[] && array_diff($array2,$array1)==[]);

}
3
  • 2
    It's helpful to explain what a code example is doing. Does this also work for multi-dimensional arrays?
    – k0pernikus
    Aug 2, 2019 at 17:12
  • 2
    array_diff get different element from array if array_diff return empty array two array is equal Aug 3, 2019 at 12:38
  • array_diff Returns an array containing the entries from array1 that are not present in any of the other arrays Feb 25 at 10:47
9

!=== will not work because it's a syntax error. The correct way is !== (not three "equal to" symbols)

9
if (array_diff($a,$b) == array_diff($b,$a)) {
  // Equals
}

if (array_diff($a,$b) != array_diff($b,$a)) {
  // Not Equals
}

From my pov it's better to use array_diff than array_intersect because with checks of this nature the differences returned commonly are less than the similarities, this way the bool conversion is less memory hungry.

Edit Note that this solution is for plain arrays and complements the == and === one posted above that is only valid for dictionaries.

4

Another method for checking equality regardless of value order works by using http://php.net/manual/en/function.array-intersect.php, like so:

$array1 = array(2,5,3);
$array2 = array(5,2,3);
if($array1 === array_intersect($array1, $array2) && $array2 === array_intersect($array2, $array1)) {
    echo 'Equal';
} else {
    echo 'Not equal';
}

Here's a version that works also with multidimensional arrays using http://php.net/manual/en/function.array-uintersect.php:

$array1 = array(
    array(5, 2),
    array(3, 6),
    array(2, 9, 4)
);
$array2 = array(
    array(3, 6),
    array(2, 9, 4),
    array(5, 2)
);

if($array1 === array_uintersect($array1, $array2, 'compare') && $array2 === array_uintersect($array2, $array1, 'compare')) {
    echo 'Equal';
} else {
    echo 'Not equal';
}

function compare($v1, $v2) {
    if ($v1===$v2) {
        return 0;
    }
    if ($v1 > $v2) return 1;
    return -1;
}
2

One way: (implementing 'considered equal' for https://www.rfc-editor.org/rfc/rfc6902#section-4.6)

This way allows associative arrays whose members are ordered differently - e.g. they'd be considered equal in every language but php :)

// recursive ksort
function rksort($a) {
  if (!is_array($a)) {
    return $a;
  }
  foreach (array_keys($a) as $key) {
    $a[$key] = ksort($a[$key]);
  }
  // SORT_STRING seems required, as otherwise
  // numeric indices (e.g. "0") aren't sorted.
  ksort($a, SORT_STRING);
  return $a;
}


// Per https://www.rfc-editor.org/rfc/rfc6902#section-4.6
function considered_equal($a1, $a2) {
  return json_encode(rksort($a1)) === json_encode(rksort($a2));
}
1
  • 1
    I believe that you it should be: $a[$key] = rksort($a[$key]);
    – pinkeen
    Apr 8, 2015 at 11:24
2

array_diff — Computes the difference of arrays

http://php.net/manual/en/function.array-diff.php

array array_diff ( array $array1 , array $array2 [, array $... ] )

Compares array1 against one or more other arrays and returns the values in array1 that are not present in any of the other arrays.

1
  • 10
    The OP wants to "check if two arrays are equal". array_diff can't tell you that. Try array_diff([1, 2], [1, 2, 'hello']).
    – marcv
    Dec 2, 2016 at 18:44
2

Syntax problem on your arrays

$array1 = array(
    'a' => 'value1',
    'b' => 'value2',
    'c' => 'value3',
 );

$array2 = array(
    'a' => 'value1',
    'b' => 'value2',
    'c' => 'value3',
 );

$diff = array_diff($array1, $array2);

var_dump($diff); 
2

Here is the example how to compare to arrays and get what is different between them.

$array1 = ['1' => 'XXX', 'second' => [
            'a' => ['test' => '2'],
            'b' => 'test'
        ], 'b' => ['no test']];

        $array2 = [
            '1' => 'XX',
            'second' => [
                'a' => ['test' => '5', 'z' => 5],
                'b' => 'test'
            ],
            'test'
        ];


        function compareArrayValues($arrayOne, $arrayTwo, &$diff = [], $reversed = false)
        {
            foreach ($arrayOne as $key => $val) {
                if (!isset($arrayTwo[$key])) {
                    $diff[$key] = 'MISSING IN ' . ($reversed ? 'FIRST' : 'SECOND');
                } else if (is_array($val) && (json_encode($arrayOne[$key]) !== json_encode($arrayTwo[$key]))) {
                    compareArrayValues($arrayOne[$key], $arrayTwo[$key], $diff[$key], $reversed);
                } else if ($arrayOne[$key] !== $arrayTwo[$key]) {
                    $diff[$key] = 'DIFFERENT';
                }
            }
        }

        $diff = [];
        $diffSecond = [];

        compareArrayValues($array1, $array2, $diff);
        compareArrayValues($array2, $array1, $diffSecond, true);

        print_r($diff);
        print_r($diffSecond);

        print_r(array_merge($diff, $diffSecond));

Result:

Array
(
    [0] => DIFFERENT
    [second] => Array
        (
            [a] => Array
                (
                    [test] => DIFFERENT
                    [z] => MISSING IN FIRST
                )

        )

    [b] => MISSING IN SECOND
    [1] => DIFFERENT
    [2] => MISSING IN FIRST
)
0

If you want to check non associative arrays, here is the solution:

$a = ['blog', 'company'];
$b = ['company', 'blog'];

(count(array_unique(array_merge($a, $b))) === count($a)) ? 'Equals' : 'Not Equals';
// Equals
1
  • 1
    i got 'Equals' for the following: $a = array('a', 'b', 'c', 'd'); $b = array('a', 'c', 'b'); echo (count(array_unique(array_merge($a, $b))) === count($a)) ? 'Equals' : 'Not Equals';
    – backbone
    Jul 23, 2020 at 12:19
0

The following solution works with custom equality functions that you can pass as a callback. Note that it doesn't check arrays order.

trait AssertTrait
{
    /**
     * Determine if two arrays have the same elements, possibly in different orders. Elements comparison function must be passed as argument.
     *
     * @param array<mixed> $expected
     * @param array<mixed> $actual
     *
     * @throws InvalidArgumentException
     */
    public static function assertArraysContainSameElements(array $expected, array $actual, callable $comparisonFunction): void
    {
        Assert::assertEquals(\count($expected), \count($actual));

        self::assertEveryElementOfArrayIsInAnotherArrayTheSameAmountOfTimes($expected, $actual, $comparisonFunction);
        self::assertEveryElementOfArrayIsInAnotherArrayTheSameAmountOfTimes($actual, $expected, $comparisonFunction);
    }

    /**
     * @param array<mixed> $needles
     * @param array<mixed> $haystack
     *
     * @throws InvalidArgumentException
     */
    private static function assertEveryElementOfArrayIsInAnotherArrayTheSameAmountOfTimes(
        array $needles,
        array $haystack,
        callable $comparisonFunction
    ): void {
        Assert::assertLessThanOrEqual(\count($needles), \count($haystack));

        foreach ($needles as $expectedElement) {
            $matchesOfExpectedElementInExpected = \array_filter(
                $needles,
                static fn($element): bool => $comparisonFunction($expectedElement, $element),
            );

            $matchesOfExpectedElementInActual = \array_filter(
                $haystack,
                static fn($element): bool => $comparisonFunction($expectedElement, $element),
            );

            Assert::assertEquals(\count($matchesOfExpectedElementInExpected), \count($matchesOfExpectedElementInActual));
        }
    }
}

I usually use it in database integrations tests when I want to ensure that the expected elements are returned but I don't care about the sorting.

0

The proper way to compare whether two arrays are equal is to use strict equality (===), which compares recursively. Existing answers are unable to recursively sort an arbitrary array (array of arbitrary depth and order, containing a mixture of sequential and associative arrays) and hence cannot handle comparisons of arbitrary arrays. Sequential arrays are associative arrays with a sequential key (0,1,2,3...) whereas associative arrays do not have a sequential key.

To sort these arbitrary arrays, we have to:

  1. Traverse downwards towards leaf nodes with no more sub-arrays
  2. Sort sequential arrays by serializing then sorting them (to remove the need of having to use custom comparators)
  3. Sort associative arrays by key

The following code implements the solution described above. Improvements to the code are welcome.

function recur_sort( &$array ) {
    foreach ( $array as &$value ) {
       if ( is_array( $value ) ) recur_sort( $value );
    }

    if ( is_sequential_array( $array ) ) {
        $array = array_map( function( $el ) { return json_encode( $el ); }, $array  );
        sort( $array, SORT_STRING );
        $array = array_map( function( $el ) { return json_decode( $el, true ); }, $array  );
        return;
    } else {
        return ksort( $array );
    }
}

function is_sequential_array(Array &$a) {
    $n = count($a);
    for($i=0; $i<$n; $i++) {
        if(!array_key_exists($i, $a)) {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

Example (in PHPUnit):

//A stricter and recursive assertEqualsCanonicalizing
public function assertSameCanonicalizing( $expected, $actual ) {
    recur_sort( $expected );
    recur_sort( $actual );
    $this->assertSame( $expected, $actual );
}
0

If you want to check that your arrays have the strictly equal (===) associations of keys and values, you can use the following function:

function array_eq($a, $b) {
    // If the objects are not arrays or differ in their size, they cannot be equal
    if (!is_array($a) || !is_array($b) || count($a) !== count($b)) {
        return false;
    }
    // If the arrays of keys are not strictly equal (after sorting),
    // the original arrays are not strictly equal either
    $a_keys = array_keys($a);
    $b_keys = array_keys($b);
    array_multisort($a_keys);
    array_multisort($b_keys);
    if ($a_keys !== $b_keys) {
        return false;
    }
    // Comparing values
    foreach ($a_keys as $key) {
        $a_value = $a[$key];
        $b_value = $b[$key];
        // Either the objects are strictly equal or they are arrays
        // which are equal according to our definition. Otherwise they
        // are different.
        if ($a_value !== $b_value && !array_eq($a_value, $b_value)) {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}
-1

Use php function array_diff(array1, array2);

It will return a the difference between arrays. If its empty then they're equal.

example:

$array1 = array(
    'a' => 'value1',

    'b' => 'value2',

    'c' => 'value3'
 );

$array2 = array(
    'a' => 'value1',

    'b' => 'value2',

    'c' => 'value4'
 );

$diff = array_diff(array1, array2);

var_dump($diff); 

//it will print array = (0 => ['c'] => 'value4' ) 

Example 2:

$array1 = array(
    'a' => 'value1',

    'b' => 'value2',

    'c' => 'value3',
 );

$array2 = array(
    'a' => 'value1',

    'b' => 'value2',

    'c' => 'value3',
 );

$diff = array_diff(array1, array2);

var_dump($diff); 

//it will print empty; 
3
  • 2
    Technically, it does not return the difference between arrays. The documentation states "Compares array1 against one or more other arrays and returns the values in array1 that are not present in any of the other arrays.". So, if all the values from array1 are present in array2, even if array2 has more values, array_diff will return an empty array
    – 2pha
    Jun 13, 2016 at 7:04
  • Does not "print null", prints an empty array (after fixing about a dozen syntax errors). Maybe you could use (count(array_diff($a1, $a2)) + count(array_diff($a2, $a1))) === 0 to test if arrays are "equal"
    – user9645
    Feb 3, 2017 at 14:42
  • I fixed the syntax ( not null is empty, and I was mixing commas -.- ). What you're proposing I think is too much. Checking if its an empty array should be enough. Feb 3, 2017 at 17:17

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