103

Google's Web Fonts API offers a way to define callback functions to be executed if a font has finished loading, or couldn't be loaded etc. Is there a way to achieve something similar using CSS3 web fonts (@font-face)?

1

7 Answers 7

173

2015 Update

Chrome 35+ and Firefox 41+ implement the CSS font loading API (MDN, W3C). Call document.fonts to get a FontFaceSet object, which has a few useful APIs for detecting the load status of fonts:

  • check(fontSpec) - returns whether all fonts in the given font list have been loaded and are available. The fontSpec uses the CSS shorthand syntax for fonts.
    Example: document.fonts.check('bold 16px Roboto'); // true or false
  • document.fonts.ready - returns a Promise indicating that font loading and layout operations are done.
    Example: document.fonts.ready.then(function () { /*... all fonts loaded...*/ });

Here's a snippet showing these APIs, plus document.fonts.onloadingdone, which offers extra information about the font faces.

alert('Roboto loaded? ' + document.fonts.check('1em Roboto'));  // false

document.fonts.ready.then(function () {
  alert('All fonts in use by visible text have loaded.');
   alert('Roboto loaded? ' + document.fonts.check('1em Roboto'));  // true
});

document.fonts.onloadingdone = function (fontFaceSetEvent) {
   alert('onloadingdone we have ' + fontFaceSetEvent.fontfaces.length + ' font faces loaded');
};
<link href='https://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Roboto:400,700' rel='stylesheet' type='text/css'>
<p style="font-family: Roboto">
  We need some text using the font, for the font to be loaded.
  So far one font face was loaded.
  Let's add some <strong>strong</strong> text to trigger loading the second one,
    with weight: 700.
</p>

IE 11 doesn't support the API. Look at available polyfills or support libraries if you need to support IE:

7
  • 2
    In Firefox 44 on Linux it looks like check always returns true: document.fonts.check('1em NoThisReallyDoesntExist'). Looking at the MDN docs it looks like this is very much an experimental/incomplete feature. It does seem to work correctly in Chromium. Commented Feb 9, 2016 at 13:03
  • Do you perhaps know how to elegantly hook up to this in Angular2? I wish there was a ngAfterFontInit in ng2 interface but there's not...
    – user776686
    Commented Nov 7, 2016 at 12:48
  • 1
    only way i could get this working is to use onloadingdone. .ready always fires immediately
    – Jason
    Commented Apr 21, 2017 at 23:35
  • 2
    Seems to me that just including the font-face does not necessary mean loading will start. You need to use the font (e.g. in the html/CSS or in the JS-code) Only then did I get the fonts loaded. I.e. just wiating for font loading in JS when u want to use it in js does not suffice
    – TomFree
    Commented Feb 15, 2021 at 11:02
  • 1
    .onloadingdone and .ready seem to fire after the fonts are loaded but before they're rendered.
    – W Biggs
    Commented Mar 16, 2021 at 20:24
20

Tested in Safari, Chrome, Firefox, Opera, IE7, IE8, IE9:

function waitForWebfonts(fonts, callback) {
    var loadedFonts = 0;
    for(var i = 0, l = fonts.length; i < l; ++i) {
        (function(font) {
            var node = document.createElement('span');
            // Characters that vary significantly among different fonts
            node.innerHTML = 'giItT1WQy@!-/#';
            // Visible - so we can measure it - but not on the screen
            node.style.position      = 'absolute';
            node.style.left          = '-10000px';
            node.style.top           = '-10000px';
            // Large font size makes even subtle changes obvious
            node.style.fontSize      = '300px';
            // Reset any font properties
            node.style.fontFamily    = 'sans-serif';
            node.style.fontVariant   = 'normal';
            node.style.fontStyle     = 'normal';
            node.style.fontWeight    = 'normal';
            node.style.letterSpacing = '0';
            document.body.appendChild(node);

            // Remember width with no applied web font
            var width = node.offsetWidth;

            node.style.fontFamily = font;

            var interval;
            function checkFont() {
                // Compare current width with original width
                if(node && node.offsetWidth != width) {
                    ++loadedFonts;
                    node.parentNode.removeChild(node);
                    node = null;
                }

                // If all fonts have been loaded
                if(loadedFonts >= fonts.length) {
                    if(interval) {
                        clearInterval(interval);
                    }
                    if(loadedFonts == fonts.length) {
                        callback();
                        return true;
                    }
                }
            };

            if(!checkFont()) {
                interval = setInterval(checkFont, 50);
            }
        })(fonts[i]);
    }
};

Use it like:

waitForWebfonts(['MyFont1', 'MyFont2'], function() {
    // Will be called as soon as ALL specified fonts are available
});
9
  • 2
    You can set it to visible:hidden and it will still be measurable
    – izb
    Commented May 16, 2013 at 14:25
  • 2
    The callback() function gets called for every font that's loaded, I guess it should only be called once?
    – Lutsen
    Commented May 27, 2013 at 10:15
  • Should be noted, that one needs extra quotes if the font-family's name requires so: waitForWebfonts(['"Vectora W01 56 Italic"'],...);
    – Lukx
    Commented Dec 4, 2013 at 12:03
  • 1
    Does not work with Chrome Version 73.0.3683.86 - Function gets triggered before the font has loaded. Tested with network throttling "Slow 3G" preset and Chrome only, didn't check other browsers.
    – Norman
    Commented Apr 8, 2019 at 8:49
  • 1
    There's one problem with this approach (explains @Norman's issue), otherwise it's awesome! You originally set the font face to sans-serif, but if you request a serif font: "Roboto Slab", serif the browser will naturally switch to a default serif font while waiting for Roboto Slab to load, triggering the measurement prematurely. Best way to fix this imo is to figure out the requested font's fallback family and use that when creating the node so that the only swap would happen once the final font has loaded. Commented Jan 4, 2020 at 11:55
12

The JS Library used by Google Web Fonts API (and Typekit) can be used without the service: WebFont Loader.

It defines callbacks for what you ask, and many more.

1
11

2017 Update

The JS library FontFaceObserver is definitely the best, most lightweight, cross-browser solution as of 2017. It also exposes a Promise-based .load() interface.

3
  • 1
    this lib has some issues with icon fonts github.com/bramstein/fontfaceobserver/issues/…
    – maersu
    Commented Feb 28, 2019 at 9:10
  • 1
    @maersu that one is easy: according to what this guy says just choose non-square character from the font and var observe_fa = new FontFaceObserver('FontAwesome'); observe_fa.load('<SOME TEST ICON SYMBOLS GO HERE>').then(...).
    – vintprox
    Commented Feb 28, 2019 at 12:39
  • @vintproykt unless the font has only square characters ;) at least I did not find any non-square in Google Material Icons.
    – maersu
    Commented Mar 1, 2019 at 13:07
1

The document.fonts.ready field is unreliable on Safari. I have found the only reliable cross-browser way (modern browsers) to be repeatedly checking for document.fonts.status === 'loaded'. Here's an example with exponential back off:

 const waitForFontsLoaded = document.fonts?.ready.then(() => {
    if (document.fonts?.status === 'loaded') {
        return null;
    }
    console.warn('Browser reported fonts ready but something is still loading...');
    return new Promise((resolve) => {
        let waitTimeMs = 5;
        const checkFontsLoaded = () => {
            if (document.fonts?.status === 'loaded') {
                return resolve();
            }
            waitTimeMs *= 2;
            return setTimeout(checkFontsLoaded, waitTimeMs);
        };
        setTimeout(checkFontsLoaded, 5);
    });
});

await waitForFontsLoaded
0

I created two methods to check for a specific font. The first method is the best one as it uses the 'fonts' interface directly with the 'check' method. The second method is not as good, but still functional, as it detects the difference directly in the DOM by comparing the size of the text with the default font to the text with the new font. It's possible, although rare, for the fonts to be so close in size that the event wouldn't fire, but I think it's highly unlikely. If that happens, you can add another span to check the difference between the serif font as well.

(Although it is pure javascript it works with React)

METHOD 1

const fontName = "Fira Sans Condensed",
    maxTime = 2500 // 2.5s

// EXAMPLE 1
fontOnload(fontName).then(() => {
    console.log("success")
})

// EXAMPLE 2
fontOnload(fontName, maxTime).then(() => {
    console.log("success")
}).catch(() => {
    console.log("timeout")
})

async function fontOnload(fontName, maxTime = Infinity, timeInterval = 10) {
    const startTime = performance.now()

    return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
        setInterval(() => {
            const currentTime = performance.now(),
                elapsedTime = currentTime - startTime
            if (document.fonts.check("12px " + fontName)) {
                resolve(true)
            } else if (elapsedTime >= maxTime) {
                reject(false)
            }
        }, timeInterval)
    })
}

METHOD 2

const fontName = "Fira Sans Condensed",
    maxTime = 2500 // 2.5s

// EXAMPLE 1
fontOnloadDOM(fontName).then(() => {
    console.log("success")
})

// EXAMPLE 2
fontOnloadDOM(fontName, maxTime).then(() => {
    console.log("success")
}).catch(() => {
    console.log("timeout")
})

async function fontOnloadDOM(fontName, maxTime = Infinity, timeInterval = 10) {
    return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
        const startTime = performance.now(),
            abc = "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789",
            mainStyle = "font-size:24px!important;display:inline!important;font-family:",
            body = document.body,
            container = document.createElement("div"),
            span1 = document.createElement("span"),
            span2 = document.createElement("span")

        container.classList.add("font-on-load")
        container.setAttribute("style", "display:block!important;position:absolute!important;top:-9999px!important;left:-9999px!important;opacity:0!important;")

        span1.setAttribute("style", mainStyle + "sans-serif!important;")
        span2.setAttribute("style", mainStyle + "\"" + fontName + "\",sans-serif!important;")

        span1.innerText = abc.repeat(3)
        span2.innerText = abc.repeat(3)

        container.append(span1, span2)
        body.append(container)

        const interval = setInterval(() => {
            const currentTime = performance.now(),
                elapsedTime = currentTime - startTime,
                width1 = span1.clientWidth || span1.getBoundingClientRect().width,
                width2 = span1.clientWidth || span2.getBoundingClientRect().width,
                diffWidths = Math.abs(width1 - width2)

            if (diffWidths > 9) {
                clearInterval(interval)
                resolve(true)
            } else if (elapsedTime >= maxTime) {
                clearInterval(interval)
                reject(false)
            }
        }, timeInterval)
    })
}
-6

The window.load event will fire when everything has loaded - that should include fonts So you could use that as the call back. However I don't think you have to is you decide to use the web font loader as

In addition to the google, typekit, ascender and monotype options, there is also a custom module that can load a stylesheet from any web-font provider.

WebFontConfig = { custom: { families: ['OneFont', 'AnotherFont'], urls: [ 'http://myotherwebfontprovider.com/stylesheet1.css', 'http://yetanotherwebfontprovider.com/stylesheet2.css' ] } };

The library sends the same events regardless of which provider you specify.

1
  • 4
    This doesn't seem to be the case: in WebKit at least, the load event can fire before web fonts have loaded.
    – Tim Down
    Commented Jun 11, 2013 at 10:39

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