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I'm testing the memory bandwidth on a desktop and a server.

Sklyake desktop 4 cores/8 hardware threads
Skylake server Xeon 8168 dual socket 48 cores (24 per socket) / 96 hardware threads

The peak bandwidth of the system is

Peak bandwidth desktop = 2-channels*8*2400 = 38.4 GB/s
Peak bandwidth server  = 6-channels*2-sockets*8*2666 = 255.94 GB/s

I'm using my own triad function from STREAM to measure the bandwidth (full code later)

void triad(double *a, double *b, double *c, double scalar, size_t n) {
  #pragma omp parallel for
  for(int i=0; i<n; i++) a[i] = b[i] + scalar*c[i];
}

Here are results I get

         Bandwidth (GB/s)
threads  Desktop  Server         
1             28      16
2(24)         29     146
4(48)         25     177
8(96)         24     189 

For 1 thread I don't understand why the desktop is so much faster than the server. According to this answer https://stackoverflow.com/a/18159503/2542702 SSE is sufficient to get the full bandwidth of a dual channel system. That's what I observe on the desktop. Two threads only helps slightly and 4 and 8 threads give a worse result But on the server the single threaded bandwidth is much less. Why is this?

On the server I get the best results using 96 threads. I would have thought it would be saturated with far fewer threads. Why are so many threads necessary to saturate the bandwidth on the server? There is a large margin of error in my results and I don't include an error estimate. I took the best result of several runs.

The code

//gcc -O3 -march=native triad.c -fopenmp
//gcc -O3 -march=skylake-avx512 -mprefer-vector-width=512 triad.c -fopenmp
#include <stdio.h>
#include <omp.h>
#include <x86intrin.h>

void triad_init(double *a, double *b, double *c, double k, size_t n) {
  #pragma omp parallel for
  for(size_t i=0; i<n; i++) a[i] = k, b[i] = k, c[i] = k;
}

void triad(double *a, double *b, double *c, double scalar, size_t n) {
  #pragma omp parallel for
  for(size_t i=0; i<n; i++) a[i] = b[i] + scalar*c[i];
}

void triad_stream(double *a, double *b, double *c, double scalar, size_t n) {
#if defined ( __AVX512F__ ) || defined ( __AVX512__ )
  __m512d scalarv = _mm512_set1_pd(scalar);
  #pragma omp parallel for
  for(size_t i=0; i<n/8; i++) {
    __m512d bv = _mm512_load_pd(&b[8*i]), cv = _mm512_load_pd(&c[8*i]);
    _mm512_stream_pd(&a[8*i], _mm512_add_pd(bv, _mm512_mul_pd(scalarv, cv)));
  }        
#else
  __m256d scalarv = _mm256_set1_pd(scalar);
  #pragma omp parallel for
  for(size_t i=0; i<n/4; i++) {
    __m256d bv = _mm256_load_pd(&b[4*i]), cv = _mm256_load_pd(&c[4*i]);
    _mm256_stream_pd(&a[4*i], _mm256_add_pd(bv, _mm256_mul_pd(scalarv, cv)));
  }        
#endif
}

int main(void) {
  size_t n = 1LL << 31LL; 
  double *a = _mm_malloc(sizeof *a * n, 64), *b = _mm_malloc(sizeof *b * n, 64), *c = _mm_malloc(sizeof *c * n, 64);
  //double peak_bw = 2*8*2400*1E-3; // 2-channels*8-bits/byte*2400MHz
  double peak_bw = 2*6*8*2666*1E-3; // 2-sockets*6-channels*8-bits/byte*2666MHz
  double dtime, mem, bw;
  printf("peak bandwidth %.2f GB/s\n", peak_bw);

  triad_init(a, b, c, 3.14159, n);
  dtime = -omp_get_wtime();
  triad(a, b, c, 3.14159, n);  
  dtime += omp_get_wtime();
  mem = 4*sizeof(double)*n*1E-9, bw = mem/dtime;
  printf("triad:       %3.2f GB, %3.2f s, %8.2f GB/s, bw/peak_bw %8.2f %%\n", mem, dtime, bw, 100*bw/peak_bw);

  triad_init(a, b, c, 3.14159, n);
  dtime = -omp_get_wtime();
  triad_stream(a, b, c, 3.14159, n);  
  dtime += omp_get_wtime();
  mem = 3*sizeof(double)*n*1E-9, bw = mem/dtime;
  printf("triads:      %3.2f GB, %3.2f s, %8.2f GB/s, bw/peak_bw %8.2f %%\n", mem, dtime, bw, 100*bw/peak_bw);
}
  • 5
    A big difference between the Skylake server and the Skylake desktop processor is the interconnect between the cores. The desktop processor has a ringbus interconnect, while the server processor has a mesh network between the cores. Broadwell server CPU's also had a ringbus, but that solution isn't very scalable for higher core counts. Indeed the advantage of Skylake-SP's mesh network is great scalability, but the single thread memory bandwidth is very disappointing. – wim Jun 28 '19 at 10:19
  • 3
    See also this description of the Skylake-SP memory subsytem, and the test results, which confirms that the single thread memory bandwidth is low. – wim Jun 28 '19 at 10:36
  • 1
    @wim, those are great links, thank you! Don't hesitate to write an answer if you think you think it will be useful. – Z boson Jun 28 '19 at 10:46
  • 1
    @Zboson: Thanks for the compliment. TBH, I think I'm not enough an expert on memory subsytems to give a definitive answer. I understand that a mesh interconnect is more scalable than a ring bus, but why couldn't they design a mesh interconnect with at least the same single thread DRAM memory bandwidth as a Broadwell server CPU? Would that have cost too much silicon, or too much power(heat)? I can only guess. With AVX-512 you actually want more bandwidth than with AVX2, not less. – wim Jun 28 '19 at 13:07
  • 2
    ....(continued) Note that limited single thread bandwidth makes it easier to produce scalable computing results. (Which reminds me of the well known paper Twelve Ways to Fool the Masses When Giving Performance Results on Parallel Computers and Goerg Hager's Blog, Fooling the masses.) – wim Jun 28 '19 at 13:08

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