4

I'm planning to write a C# extension method to only join a specific range of elements of a string array. For example, if I have this array:

+-----+  +-----+  +-------+  +------+  +------+  +-----+
| one |  | two |  | three |  | four |  | five |  | six |
+-----+  +-----+  +-------+  +------+  +------+  +-----+
   0        1         2          3         4        5

And I only want to join them using , from index 2 to index 4. I got three,four,five. If the user doesn't provide start index and end index, then my Join method will join all array elements. Below is my method signature.

public static class StringSplitterJoinner
{
    public static string Join(this string[] me, string separator, int start_index = 0, int end_index = me.Length - 1) {

    }
}

The problem is that the parameter end_index can't reference the first parameter me and it generates an error. I don't want the user to always provide start_index and end_index I want my method has some meaningful default values. In this case, how can I solve this problem?

3
  • 3
    What you want/should do are method overloads. Just create another method Join there that is not having startIndex and endIndex arguments. (If you look around in the documentation of .NET's class library, you'll see method overloads are used almost everywhere...) – user2819245 Jun 28 '19 at 14:44
  • How about to define last parameter as int? end_index = null? If user dosn't set it to something you can manually assign it in method: end_index = end_index ?? me.Length - 1; – Aleks Andreev Jun 28 '19 at 14:45
  • Defaults have limited uses. This definitely isn't one of them. Remember that every call involving a default must be passed a value anyway, it's just that it will be inserted for you at the call site by the compiler. That alone makes them unattractive even for many scenarios where they work. – Jeroen Mostert Jun 28 '19 at 14:46
3

How about this:

public static class StringSplitterJoinner
{
    public static string Join(this string[] me, string separator, int start_index = 0, int? end_index = null)
    {
        if (!end_index.HasValue) end_index = me.Length - 1;
    }
}
5
  • 1
    A shorter implementation of your idea end_index = end_index ?? me.Length - 1; – Dmitry Bychenko Jun 28 '19 at 14:46
  • I don't like overloading when you can use default values. – Wolfgang Kleinschmit Jun 28 '19 at 14:50
  • Even shorter: end_index ?= me.Length - 1 – mariocatch Jun 28 '19 at 14:51
  • Even better would be end_index ??= me.Length -1; Unfortunately that operator doesn't exist 😉. – Wolfgang Kleinschmit Jun 28 '19 at 14:56
  • @WolfgangKleinschmit mine was a typo, ??= is an operator (c# 8) – mariocatch Jun 30 '19 at 0:00
6

I suggest using overloading:

public static string Join(this string[] me, string separator) {
  //TODO: add parameters' validation

  return Join(me, separator, 0, me.Length - 1);
}

public static string Join(this string[] me, string separator, int start_index) {
  //TODO: add parameters' validation

  return Join(me, separator, start_index, me.Length - 1);
}

public static string Join(this string[] me, string separator, int start_index, int end_Index) {
  //TODO: implement logic here
}
1

You can also do this:

public static string Join<T>(this IReadOnlyCollection<T> me,
  string separator, int startIndex = 0, int endIndexInclusive = -1)
{
  if (endIndexInclusive < 0)
    endIndexInclusive += me.Count;

  var range = me.Skip(startIndex).Take(endIndexInclusive - startIndex + 1);
  return string.Join(separator, range);
}

The idea here is that negative indices count from the other end, so -1 is the last index, -2 is the second to last index, and so on. The value taken if the argument is not specified explicitly, -1, means the last entry in the collection.

(You could include if (startIndex < 0) startIndex += me.Count; as well if you wanted.)

Method has been made general (generic) but can still be used on a string[]. Example:

string[] myArray = ...
var joined = myArray.Join(",", 2, -3); // skips first two, and last two, entries

Be aware that the -3 can also be written as ~2 using bit-wise complement. That looks more symmetrical, myArray.Join(",", 2, ~2).

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